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Today's Headlines Bank Indonesia

  • Forecast of Indonesian July Inflation and August Benchmark Interest Rate

    The pace of Indonesian inflation in July 2014 is expected to be in the range of 0.60 to 0.75 percent (month-on-month). If realized, this would be one of the lowest July inflation figures in recent Indonesian history. Traditionally, the month of July brings high inflationary pressures as consumers spend more on food products and other consumer goods as well as transportation amid the holy fasting month of Ramadan and subsequent Idul Fitri celebrations (which also involves the mudik tradition).

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  • Bank Indonesia: Consumer Price Index Expected to Rise 0.85% in July 2014

    Deputy Governor of Indonesia’s central bank (Bank Indonesia), Mirza Adityaswara, expects that inflation in July 2014 will reach between 0.8 and 0.9 percent (month-to-month). If realized, this would be relatively mild inflation amid a month that is traditionally characterized by high inflationary pressures due to the impact of the holy Muslim fasting period (Ramadan) and Idul Fitri celebrations. In this period Indonesian consumers always increase purchases of food and other consumer products such as clothes and shoes.

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  • Bank Indonesia Concerned about Local Companies' Unhedged Foreign Debt

    Bank Indonesia Concerned about Local Companies' Unhedged Foreign Debt

    Although Indonesia’s debt-to-GDP ratio is currently still at a safe level at roughly 32.8 percent, the country’s central bank (Bank Indonesia) expressed its concern about the high debt service ratio (DSR) and debt-to-export ratio. The DSR is the ratio of debt service payments (principal and interest) of a country to its export earnings. Generally, a healthy ratio is somewhere in the range of 0 and 20 percent. However, Indonesia’s DSR has risen from 20 percent in 2007 to 50 percent in 2014.

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  • Bank Indonesia Keeps Key Interest Rate (BI Rate) at 7.50% in July 2014

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) decided to keep its benchmark interest rate (BI rate) at 7.50 percent at today’s Board of Governor’s meeting. The lending facility as well as deposit facility were maintained at 7.50 and 5.75 percent, respectively. The central bank believes that the current interest rate environment is able to push the inflation figure back to its target range of between 3.5 and 5.5 percent by the year-end. Earlier this month, Statistics Indonesia announced that inflation has eased to 6.70 percent (year-on-year) in June 2014.

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  • Foreign Exchange Reserves at Bank Indonesia Rise Slightly in June 2014

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia, BI) released a statement on Monday (07/07) which shows that the country’s foreign exchange reserves have expanded 0.7 percent to USD $107.7 billion in June 2014 mainly on an increase of the government’s oil & gas revenue (that exceeds the foreign debt payment) and higher foreign-exchange term deposits at local banks, reducing the need for Bank Indonesia to intervene in the foreign exchange market. However, the central bank did not provide any figures on these revenues and deposits.

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  • A Forecast on Indonesia’s May Trade Balance and June Inflation

    Indonesian Finance Minister Chatib Basri estimates that the trade balance of Indonesia may post an USD $500 million surplus in May 2014 amid improved performance of the country’s crude palm oil (CPO) exports, both in terms of price and volume (crude palm oil being one of the most important foreign exchange earners of Indonesia). Concern about Indonesia’s trade balance (and current account balance) had returned after Indonesia recorded an USD $1.96 billion deficit in the previous month.

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  • Bank Indonesia and World Bank: How to Escape the Middle Income Trap?

    Bank Indonesia and World Bank: How to Escape the Middle Income Trap?

    The Governor of Indonesia’s central bank (Bank Indonesia), Agus Martowardojo, said that the Indonesian economy can grow more than six percent provided that several important structural reforms will be implemented in order to avoid the middle income trap. This trap occurs when rapidly growing economies stagnate at middle-income levels for many years, thereby failing to reach a high income level (as has been the case with Brazil, Mexico, South Africa and other middle income countries from the early 1980s to the mid-2000s).

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  • Indonesia Financial Update: May 2014 Trade Balance and June 2014 Inflation

    Indonesia Financial Update: May 2014 Trade Balance and June 2014 Inflation

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects to see a trade surplus in May 2014. Governor of Bank Indonesia Agus Martowardojo stated that he is optimistic that Indonesia’s trade balance will show positive growth after recording a shocking deficit of USD $1.96 billion in April 2014. This deficit was mainly the result of weak global demand for crude palm oil and coal, both of which are Indonesia’s most important foreign exchange earners in the non-oil & gas sector. However, this global demand is expected to have remained weak in May.

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  • Foreign Exchange Reserves of Indonesia Rise to $107B in May 2014

    Foreign Exchanges Reserves of Indonesia Rise to $107 Billion in May 2014

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) announced that its foreign exchanges reserves had risen to USD $107.0 billion by the end of May 2014, up from USD $105.6 billion at the end of the previous month. This increase primarily stemmed from government oil and gas export earnings as well as an influx of foreign portfolio capital into Southeast Asia's largest economy, which reflects the positive perception of international investors with regard to the economic fundamentals of Indonesia.

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  • Bank Indonesia: Consumer Confidence in Indonesia Increases in May 2014

    Bank Indonesia: Consumer Confidence in Indonesia Increases in May 2014

    According to Bank Indonesia's consumer confidence survey, Indonesian consumers were more optimistic in May 2014 compared to the previous month. Consumer confidence in Southeast Asia's largest economy increased to 116.90 in May 2014 from 113.90 in April. The increase indicates that Indonesian consumers are more optimistic about the current condition of the Indonesian economy as well as conditions in the coming six months. The result in May 2014 was also higher than in the same month in 2013 (112.8).

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Latest Columns Bank Indonesia

  • Bank Indonesia's Loosening Monetary Policy: Impact of Lower Interest Rates

    Bank Indonesia's Loosening Monetary Policy: Impact of Lower Interest Rates

    In the first three policy meetings of 2016, Indonesia's central bank (Bank Indonesia) cut its benchmark BI rate gradually yet aggressively from 7.50 percent to 6.75 percent as inflation, the rupiah rate and Indonesia's current account deficit were regarded as 'under control'. At the same time, Indonesia's lender of last resort acknowledged the BI rate has failed to influence borrowing costs and market liquidity effectively and therefore decided to adopt the seven-day reverse repurchase rate (reverse repo) as the nation's new benchmark starting from August 2016.

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  • Bank Indonesia Revises Down 2016 Economic Growth Projection

    Bank Indonesia Revises Down 2016 Economic Growth Projection

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) revised down its projection for Indonesia's economic growth in 2016 to the range of 5.0 - 5.4 percent (y/y), slightly below its previous forecast in the range of 5.2 - 5.6 percent (y/y). Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo said the central bank decided to trim its projection for gross domestic product (GDP) growth this year due to sluggish global economic growth, low commodity prices, and Indonesia's slightly disappointing Q1-2016 GDP growth figure at 4.92 percent (y/y).

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  • Update Indonesia's Q1-2016 Balance of Payments & Current Account

    Update Indonesia's Q1-2016 Balance of Payments & Current Account

    Indonesia's balance of payments registered a deficit in the first quarter of 2016. Based on the latest data from Indonesia's central bank (Bank Indonesia), the deficit stood at USD $287 million in Q1-2016, down from a USD $1.3 billion surplus in the same quarter last year. The balance of payments deficit was the result of the nation's Q1-2016 capital and financial transaction surpluses (USD $4.17 billion) not being able to cover the current account deficit (CAD). Indonesia's Q1-2016 CAD shrank to USD $4.67 billion, or 2.14 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP).

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  • Indonesia in April: State Budget & 7-day Reverse Repurchase Rate

    Indonesia in April: State Budget & 7-day Reverse Repurchase Rate

    If we look back on the month of April, two important matters - related to the economy - occurred in Indonesia this month: (1) in the first week of April, the Indonesian government managed to complete the Revised 2016 State Budget (RAPBN-P 2016), and, one week later, (2) the central bank (Bank Indonesia) announced it will adopt a new benchmark monetary tool per 19 August 2016 - the so-called seven-day reverse repurchase rate - that is to replace the existing BI rate (which fails to influence market liquidity effectively).

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  • Central Bank & Indonesia's Statistics Agency Expect Deflation in April 2016

    Central Bank & Indonesia's Statistics Agency Expect Deflation in April 2016

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects to see deflation in April 2016 on the back of controlled food prices as the harvest season has arrived. Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo said a central bank survey shows deflation of 0.33 percent month-to-month (m/m) during the first three weeks of April. Besides lower food prices, Martowardojo also attributes April deflation to the government's decision to cut fuel prices (premium gasoline and diesel) by IDR 500 (approx. USD $0.04) per liter per 1 April. This move led to a 4 percent drop in public transportation tariffs.

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  • Bank Indonesia Adopts New Reference Rate: 7-day Reverse Repurchase Rate

    Bank Indonesia Adopts New Reference Rate: 7-day Reverse Repurchase Rate

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) announced on Friday (15/04) it will adopt a new monetary tool per 19 August 2016 that is to replace the existing BI rate which is considered too inefficient to influence market liquidity as it is not directly tied to Indonesia's money markets. The seven-day reverse repurchase rate (reverse repo), which stood at 5.50 percent in the central bank's last auction, is to become the nation's new benchmark. Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo, who communicated through a teleconference from Washington DC, emphasized that the central bank will not change its monetary stance.

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  • Bank Indonesia Cuts Key Interest Rate Again by 0.25%

    Bank Indonesia Cuts Key Interest Rate Again by 0.25%

    In line with expectation, the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) cut its benchmark interest rate (BI rate) by 25 basis points to 6.75 percent on Thursday (17/03) at its two-day policy meeting. It is the third straight month of monetary easing in Southeast Asia's largest economy. In the preceding two months the lender of last resort had also cut borrowing costs by 0.25 percent, each month. Furthermore, the deposit and lending facility rates were also cut by 25 basis points to 4.75 percent and 7.25 percent, respectively (effective per 18 March 2016).

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  • Bank Indonesia Expects Deflation in February 2016

    Bank Indonesia Expects Deflation in February 2016

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects to see deflation at 0.15 percent month-to-month (m/m) in February 2016. Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo said lower (government) administered prices in combination with low core inflation will be the recipe for deflation in the second month of the year. The lower administered prices that are primarily the cause of deflation consist of fuel prices, air fares and 12-kilogram liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) canisters. In the first month of the year Indonesian inflation accelerated to 4.14 percent (y/y).

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  • Bank Indonesia Remains Committed to Tight Monetary Stance

    Bank Indonesia Remains Committed to Tight Monetary Stance

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) is expected to keep its benchmark interest rate (BI rate) relatively high in order to safeguard Indonesia's financial stability in 2016 (instead of seeking accelerated economic growth through a rate cut). Despite easing pressures on inflation and the country's current account balance, Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo said that persistent global uncertainty (referring to the looming US Fed Fund Rate hike and China's slowdown) justifies the tight monetary stance.

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  • Does Bank Indonesia Have Room to Cut its Key Interest Rate?

    Does Bank Indonesia Have Room to Cut its Key Interest Rate?

    As Indonesia's inflation rate has eased to 6.25 percent (y/y) in October 2015 from 6.83 percent (y/y) in the previous month, and given that Indonesian inflation will ease more markedly in the last two months of 2015 as the impact of the subsidized fuel price hike in November 2014 will vanish, the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) seems to have more scope to cut its current relatively high benchmark interest rate, hence giving rise to accelerated economic activity.

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