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Today's Headlines Current Account Balance

  • Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 2.4% of GDP in 2017

    Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 2.4% of GDP in 2017

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects Indonesia's current account deficit (CAD) to widen to 2.4 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP), or about USD $23 billion, in 2017. Therefore, Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo said the CAD remains one of the bigger challenges for Indonesia in the foreseeable future. In 2016 the nation's CAD had in fact eased to 1.8 percent of GDP (or USD $17 billion) on the back of a big improvement in the last quarter of 2016.

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  • Bank Indonesia Sees Widening Current Account Deficit in 2017

    Bank Indonesia Sees Widening Current Account Deficit in 2017

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects the nation's current account deficit to widen to 2.4 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2017 due to expectation of rising imports in Indonesia this year. These rising imports come on the back of growing investment realization in Southeast Asia's largest economy. This projection is significantly higher compared to the estimated USD $17 billion, or 1.8 percent of GDP, current account deficit in 2016.

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  • Trade Balance Indonesia: Exports & Imports Rising in October 2016

    Trade Balance Indonesia: Exports & Imports Rising in October 2016

    Indonesia recorded a USD $1.21 billion trade surplus in October 2016 according to the latest data from the nation's Central Statistics Agency (BPS). In line with expectations both exports and imports rose last month supported by rising commodity prices (hence boosting the country's export performance) and an increase in machinery and electrical appliance imports into Indonesia. Meanwhile, BPS revised September's trade surplus to USD $1.27 billion, from USD $1.22 billion reported last month.

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  • Current Account Balance Indonesia: Deficit Eases to 1.83% of GDP in Q3

    Current Account Balance Indonesia: Deficit Eases to 1.83% of GDP in Q3-2016

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) announced that the nation's current account deficit (CAD) eased to 1.83 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in the third quarter of 2016, improving from a revised 2.2 percent of GDP deficit in the preceding quarter. Bank Indonesia further informed that the CAD will most likely remain in the range of 2.0 - 2.5 percent of GDP in full-year 2016. In 2015 Indonesia's CAD eased to 2.1 percent of GDP. Since late-2011 Southeast Asia's largest economy has had to cope with a wide current account deficit.

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  • Current Account Balance Update Indonesia: Deficit is Improving

    Current Account Balance Update Indonesia: Deficit is Improving

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects Indonesia's current account deficit to have improved to below 2 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) in the third quarter of 2016. This is good news as a wide (and structural) current account deficit is considered a financial weakness because it means the country is building up liabilities to the rest of the world. Ever since late-2011 Indonesia has been suffering a wide current account deficit. This is particularly attributed to the globe's low commodity prices after 2011.

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  • Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 2.2% of GDP in FY-2016

    Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 2.2% of GDP in FY-2016

    Bank Indonesia, the central bank of Indonesia, expects the country's current account deficit to increase to USD $4.8 billion - or about 2.2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) - in full-year 2016. Although the deficit remains high - and is forecast to go higher - there is optimism that this increase is caused by rising imports of capital goods and raw materials. These goods and materials are used to manufacture new products (that may be exported from Indonesia) and therefore have a positive impact on the economy (in contrast to consumer product imports that bring few future economic value).

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  • Growing Economic Activity in Indonesia, Higher Current Account Deficit

    Growing Economic Activity in Indonesia, Higher Current Account Deficit

    Indonesia's current account deficit is expected to rise to USD $26 billion, or 2.6 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP), in 2016. This increase is expected because rising investment and infrastructure development in Indonesia will require more imports from abroad. In 2015 Indonesia's current account deficit was recorded at USD $17.8 billion (2.06 percent of GDP), improving from a USD $27.5 billion deficit (3.09 percent of GDP) in the preceding year (when Indonesia touched a record high current account deficit, and which seriously undermined investors' confidence in the nation's assets).

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  • Indonesia's Current Account Deficit Data Released - Quick Walkthrough

    Indonesia's Current Account Deficit Data Released

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) announced on Friday (12/02) that Indonesia's current account deficit widened to 2.39 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP), or USD $5.1 billion, in the fourth quarter of 2015 from a deficit of 1.94 percent of GDP (USD $4.2 billion) in the preceding quarter. This increase was due to a decline in the non-oil & gas trade balance surplus as non-oil & gas imports grew 7.5 percent (q/q) amid higher domestic demand amid accelerating economic growth in the last quarter of 2015.

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  • Moody's Investors Service Keeps Indonesia's Credit Rating at Baa3

    Moody's Investors Service Keeps Indonesia Credit Rating at Baa3

    New York-based Moody's Investors Service kept Indonesia's sovereign credit rating at Baa3 (stable outlook), the lowest level within the investment grade rating. Although the rating agency is positive about the strong nature of Indonesia's economy and the prudent fiscal policy that is safeguarded by the Indonesian government and central bank, it sees few room for an upgrade soon (to Baa2) as government revenue is not expected to rise significantly in the period ahead. Moody's released this statement on Thursday (28/01).

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  • LPS: Indonesia's Current Account Deficit Widens in 2016 & 2017

    LPS: Indonesia's Current Account Deficit Widens in 2016 & 2017

    The Indonesia Deposit Insurance Corporation (in Indonesian: Lembaga Penjamin Simpanan, or LPS) expects to see Indonesia's current account deficit growing to USD $20.8 billion, equivalent to 2.3 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP), in 2016. In the following year, the institution estimates that the current account deficit will continue to widen toward USD $25.1 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) due to an expected decline in Indonesia's trade surplus.

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Latest Columns Current Account Balance

  • Monetary Policy Indonesia: the Need for Hawkish Statements Reduces

    Monetary Policy Indonesia: the Need for Hawkish Statements Reduces

    In line with expectations, the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) kept its benchmark BI 7-Day Reverse Repo Rate at 6.00 percent at the February policy meeting that was held on 20-21 February 2019. Also the deposit facility and lending facility rates were kept at 5.25 percent and 6.75 percent, respectively.

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  • Current Account Balance of Indonesia: Unlikely to Improve in 3rd Quarter of 2018

    Current Account Balance of Indonesia: Unlikely to Improve in 3rd Quarter of 2018

    Indonesia’s current account balance – which measures the flow of goods, services and investment - remains a source of concern. In the second quarter of 2018 Indonesia’s current account deficit widened to USD $8.02 billion or 3.0 percent of gross domestic product (GDP). It is the biggest quarterly deficit since Q2-2014 and implies that Indonesia is dependent on foreign capital to fund its deficits. This makes investors nervous and therefore foreign funds rapidly exit Indonesia in times of global turmoil.

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  • Indonesia Sees Widening Current Account Deficit in Q2-2018

    Indonesia Sees Widening Current Account Deficit in Q2-2018

    Concerns about Indonesia's current account balance increased after Bank Indonesia announced last week that the country's current account deficit widened to USD $8.02 billion, or 3.0 percent of gross domestic product (GDP), in the second quarter of 2018. It is Indonesia's highest quarterly deficit since Q3-2014, thus putting additional pressures on the rupiah exchange rate.

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  • Economy of Indonesia is Facing Several Big Challenges

    Economy of Indonesia is Facing Several Big Challenges

    There are doubts whether Indonesia's gross domestic product (GDP) growth can reach 5.2 percent year-on-year (y/y) in full-year 2018 as Indonesia is experiencing a couple of major challenges. Challenges include the global trade war, the fragile rupiah, Bank Indonesia's higher benchmark interest rate, the current account deficit, and political tensions ahead of the 2019 legislative and presidential elections. Currently, Indonesia Investments' forecast for Indonesia's economic growth is set at 5.2 percent (y/y) in 2018.

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  • Current Account Deficit of Indonesia at 2.15% of GDP in Q1-2018

    Current Account Deficit of Indonesia at 2.15% of GDP in Q1-2018

    Indonesia's current account balance - the broadest measure of the country's international trade - showed a deficit of USD $5.5 billion, equivalent to 2.15 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP), in the first quarter of 2018. Compared to Q4-2017 (when the deficit was recorded at USD $6.0 billion, or 2.3 percent of GDP), the current account deficit (CAD) declined.

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  • Weak Diversification Behind Indonesia's Trade & Current Account Deficits

    Weak Diversification Behind Indonesia's Trade & Current Account Deficits

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) said it expects to see another monthly trade deficit - approximately USD $230 million - in February 2018. If so, it would be the third straight monthly trade deficit for Southeast Asia's largest economy after a USD $220 million deficit in December 2017 and a USD $678 million deficit in January 2018 (the latter being the country's highest monthly deficit since April 2014).

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  • Financial Update Indonesia: Rupiah, Forex & Current Account

    Financial Update Indonesia: Rupiah, Forex & Current Account

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) said the country's current account deficit remained under control, albeit widening in the last quarter of 2017. Indonesia's current account deficit reached USD $5.8 billion or 2.2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in Q4-2017 (up from a deficit of USD $4.6 billion or 1.7 percent of GDP in the preceding quarter).

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  • Update Indonesia's Q1-2016 Balance of Payments & Current Account

    Update Indonesia's Q1-2016 Balance of Payments & Current Account

    Indonesia's balance of payments registered a deficit in the first quarter of 2016. Based on the latest data from Indonesia's central bank (Bank Indonesia), the deficit stood at USD $287 million in Q1-2016, down from a USD $1.3 billion surplus in the same quarter last year. The balance of payments deficit was the result of the nation's Q1-2016 capital and financial transaction surpluses (USD $4.17 billion) not being able to cover the current account deficit (CAD). Indonesia's Q1-2016 CAD shrank to USD $4.67 billion, or 2.14 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP).

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  • Current Account Indonesia in Check, Worry about Import and Capital & Financial Account

    Current Account Indonesia in Check, Worry about Import and Capital & Financial Account

    Indonesia's current account deficit eased to USD $4.01 billion, or 1.86 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP), in the third quarter of 2015. The central bank (Bank Indonesia) said this improvement is particularly caused by a stronger non-oil & gas trade balance. However, Indonesia's capital and financial account surplus declined to USD $1.2 billion, causing the balance of payments deficit to widen to USD $4.6 billion from USD $2.9 billion in the preceding quarter.

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  • Indonesia’s Current Account Deficit Explained: Why, What, When & How?

    Indonesia’s Current Account Deficit Explained: Why, What, When & How?

    Since late 2011 Indonesia has been plagued by a structural current account deficit (CAD) that has worried both policymakers and (foreign) investors. Despite Indonesian authorities having implemented policy reforms and economic adjustments in recent years, the country’s CAD remains little-changed in 2015. The World Bank and Bank Indonesia both expect the CAD to persist at slightly below 3 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product (GDP) in 2015, alarmingly close to the boundary that separates a sustainable from an unsustainable deficit.

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