• Trade Balance: Small Trade Surplus in September, Start of Recovery?

    Trade Balance: Small Trade Surplus in September, Start of Recovery?

    Based on the latest data from Indonesia’s Statistical Agency (BPS), Indonesia recorded a USD $227.1 million trade surplus in September 2018. Although it is a very small surplus, it did lead to some optimism. After all, Indonesia had recorded big monthly trade deficits of USD $2.0 billion and USD $944.2 million in July 2018 and August 2018, respectively.

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  • A Quick look at the World Bank’s Latest Indonesia Economic Quarterly

    A Quick look at the World Bank’s Latest Indonesia Economic Quarterly

    In the second half of September 2018 the World Bank released its latest Indonesia Economic Quarterly (abbreviated IEQ), titled “Urbanization for All”. The IEQ, a flagship publication of the Washington-based institution which (at least in our view) is among the most interesting reports that are on a regular basis published about the Indonesian economy, has two main aims. Firstly, it informs about the key developments that occurred in Indonesia’s economy over the past three months, and places these developments in a longer-term and global context. Secondly, the IEQ provides an in-depth examination of selected economic and policy issues and an analysis of Indonesia’s medium-term development challenges.

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  • Outlook on the Food Service Industry in Indonesia

    Outlook on the Food Service Industry in Indonesia

    Indonesia, with a population of approximately 267 million, is the largest market for the Food Service Industry in the ASEAN region. With rising incomes amongst the growing middle class and changes in lifestyles, the Food Service Industry in Indonesia is expected to show a compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) between 2018 and 2023 of 7.06 percent.

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  • What Are the Challenges Faced by the Expanded B20 Biodiesel Program?

    What Are the Challenges Faced by the Expanded B20 Biodiesel Program?

    On 1 September 2018 the expanded B20 biodiesel program was launched. It means that the government of Indonesia requires all diesel fuel that is used within the country to contain biodiesel (with a 20 percent amount of bio-content, typically fatty acid methyl ester [FAME] that is derived from palm oil). This program will boost domestic palm oil consumption (which is important because palm oil exports are currently not doing too great amid low prices and anti-palm oil campaigns in various western countries), but more importantly the program aims to slash imports of fuel, hence encouraging a narrower current account deficit and a stronger rupiah. Meanwhile, the program also aims at reducing carbon emissions.

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