Columns of Richard Cox

  • Bank Indonesia Ending the Era of High Interest Rates?

    Bank Indonesia Ending the Era of High Interest Rates?

    Bank Indonesia (BI) is the central bank of the Republic of Indonesia, and was known as "De Javasche bank" or "The Java Bank" in the colonial period.  Bank Indonesia was founded on 1 July 1953 from the nationalization of De Javasche Bank. As an independent state institution, Bank Indonesia is fully autonomous in formulating and implementing each of its assumed tasks and most policy goals tend to center around the ability to stabilize prices in the economy.

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  • What Is Next For Indonesian Interest Rates?

    What Is Next For Indonesian Interest Rates?

    On September 22, 2016, the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) decided to cut its BI seven-day repo rate from 5.25 percent to 5.00 percent, and this has changed parts of the long-term outlook for investors. Bank Indonesia also reduced its lending rate to 5.75 percent (from previous 5.50 percent), and the deposit rate to 4.50 percent (from previous 4.75 percent previously). This is significant because it shows that lending rates and interest rates have dropped to multi-year lows with the current policy changes.

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  • Telekomunikasi Indonesia; Can This Year’s Bull Run Continue?

    Telekomunikasi Indonesia; Can This Year’s Bull Run Continue?

    PT Telekomunikasi Indonesia (NYSE: TLK) is engaged in telecommunications, information technology, and media businesses worldwide. In its latest figures, the company reported earnings of USD $2 billion along with revenues of USD $7 billion in full-year 2015. The results reflect a profit margin of 16.32 percent and an operating margin of 35.17 percent, ensuring an earnings-per-share of USD $2.80.

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  • Basic Economics: Inflation’s Effects on Gold Prices

    Basic Economics: Inflation’s Effects on Gold Prices

    Gold investment levels in Asia continue to hold close to their all-time highs, and many regional investors are asking questions about what is next for the bullish trend in precious metals. To answer this question, it is important to take another look at old-fashioned economics as a means for determining how price valuations are likely to unfold in the future. One of the most critical economic forces in these areas is the force of market inflation, and its influence on the yellow metal can be significant depending on the underlying fundamentals present in the global economy.

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  • PBOC Expects GDP Increase, In Spite Of Export Losses

    PBOC Expects GDP Increase, In Spite Of Export Losses

    When we are looking at economic forecasts for potential growth prospects in Indonesia, it makes sense to have an idea of what is happening in the peripheral regions. China is still used as a firm indicator of where we are headed with emerging markets and here we will look at some of the reasons why the People's Bank of China's (PBOC) is still expecting growth even if potentially negative factors occur.

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