• New Lifestyles & Trends: What Car Do Indonesian Consumers Want?

    New Lifestyles & Trends: What Car Do Indonesian Consumers Want?

    Indonesians love the multipurpose vehicle (MPV), known as "people carriers", as these vehicles are bigger and taller than the family car. Indonesians enjoy taking trips with the family (and/or invite some friends) and therefore a big car is required. The MPV can carry up to seven passengers and thus meets this request. Car manufacturers are aware of high MPV demand and therefore continue to launch new (and better) models. With functionality in check, manufacturers now particularly focus on improving the design of the MPV to entice Indonesian consumers.

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  • The Life of an Expat in Jakarta: App-Based Transport Services

    The Life of an Expat in Jakarta: App-Based Transport Services

    Foreigners who live in Indonesia's capital city of Jakarta are well aware of the horrible traffic situation. The lack of sufficient infrastructure development in combination with high car sales in recent years as well as the ever-growing population of Jakarta have resulted in complete standstills in many parts of the city, particularly on weekdays. To cover a relatively small distance in a car or taxi it can take hours, a loss of valuable time. Fortunately, there is a solution to these traffic jams.

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  • Islam & Indonesian Culture: Impact of Idul Fitri on the Economy

    Islam & Indonesian Culture: Impact of Idul Fitri on the Economy

    Next week Indonesia's financial and stock markets are closed for Idul Fitri (also known as Lebaran or Eid al-Fitr), the celebrations that mark the end of the holy Islamic fasting month (Ramadan). As usual, during the Ramadan month (that started in early June) business activities in Indonesia start to slow and this slowdown will reach its "peak" during the Idul Fitri holiday, a national holiday (from Monday 4 July to Friday 8 July) when some 17.6 million Indonesians who live and work in the bigger cities will return to their places of origin for a couple of days (a tradition called mudik).

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