Below is a list with tagged columns and company profiles.

Today's Headlines Employment

  • Number of Foreign Tourists in Indonesia Rises to 2 Million in Q1-2013

    According to data from Statistics Indonesia (Badan Pusat Statistik), Indonesia was visited by over 725 thousand foreign visitors in March 2013, up 10.1 percent compared to the same month last year. The Indonesian government has set the ambitious target of welcoming a total of nine million foreign tourists in 2013. In 2014, it wants at least 10 million foreigners to visit Indonesia. The government expects these increases to originate mainly from the Asia-Pacific region itself.

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Latest Columns Employment

  • Slowing Economy of Indonesia: Rising Youth Unemployment

    Slowing Economy of Indonesia: Rising Youth Unemployment

    Hariyadi Sukamdani, Chairman of the Indonesian Employers Association (Apindo), expressed his concern about unemployment in Indonesia, particularly unemployment among the younger generation of Indonesians (aged between 15 and 29). Amid slowing economic growth over the past six years, various industries have been cutting employment. With roughly half of the total population below 30 years of age, Indonesia’s demographic bonus can turn into disaster if this potential workforce fails to obtain employment opportunities.

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  • Illegal Strikes in Indonesia: Criteria and Consequences

    Besides regulating legal strikes in Indonesia, which we have discussed in our previous column, the Indonesian government also regulates illegal strikes performed by employees. According to article 142 Indonesian Law number 13 of 2003 regarding Manpower (Labor Law) illegal strikes are strikes which do not fulfill the notification requirements set out in the Labor Law or in case it is disrupting the public interest and/or endangering the public safety. In this week’s column we discuss the legal consequences of an illegal strike.

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  • Strikes in Indonesia: a Right of Employees

    Strikes in Indonesia: a Right of Employees

    Based on article 137 Indonesian Law number 13 of 2003 regarding Manpower (Labor Law), employees in Indonesia are permitted to perform strikes under certain conditions. The strikes can be either staged by employees or by labor unions which represent a group of employees. The Labor Law defines legal strikes which are held in accordance with legislation and illegal strikes which do not observe the rules set by legislation. In this column we will discuss the legal strikes. In our column of next week we will discuss the illegal strikes.

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  • Restrictions Employing Foreign Workers in Indonesia

    Law number 13 of 2003 regarding Manpower (Labor Law) and its implementing regulations are setting stringent restrictions to companies employing Foreign Workers (expatriates). Besides the licensing requirements as we discussed in our previous columns, the legislation sets other restrictions to companies which wish to employ foreign workers. In this weeks’ column we will discuss these restrictions to companies.

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  • Expatriate (Foreign Worker) Work Permit Indonesia - Part III

    Expatriate (Foreign Worker) Work Permit Indonesia - Part III

    This column is the third and final column regarding the work permit requirements for foreign workers (expatriates) in Indonesia. In the first column we discussed the requirements set by the Ministry of Manpower, which include (i) Foreign Manpower Utilization Plan (RPTKA), (ii) Approval Recommendation Visa (TA-01), and (iii) Work Permit (IMTA). In our second column we discussed the requirements set by immigration, which include Limited Stay Visa (VITAS) and Limited Stay Permit Card (KITAS). This week we discuss the remaining requirements set by the Police office, the departments of Labor and Demography and Civil Registration.

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  • Expatriate (Foreign Worker) Work Permit Indonesia - Part II

    In last week’s column we explained which licenses are required by the Ministry of Manpower for expatriates (foreign workers) who wish to obtain a work permit in Indonesia. We explained that the foreign workers (expatriate) who want to work in Indonesia must obtain the following permits which are issued by the Ministry of Manpower: (i) Foreign Manpower Utilization Plan (RPTKA), (ii) Approval Recommendation Visa (TA-01), and (iii) Work Permit (IMTA). Besides these permits, several other permits must be arranged at immigration, which we discuss in this week’s column.

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  • Fixed Term Employees in Indonesia: Early Termination

    Early termination of the employment agreement of fixed term employees in Indonesia is separately regulated from termination of permanent employees in the Indonesian Law number 13 of 2003 regarding Manpower (Labor Law). Fixed term employees have an employment agreement which will end at a particular date, or on completion of a specific task or project. In this column we will discuss the reasons of termination of the employment agreement of fixed term employees and its financial impact on the employee or the company.

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  • World Bank Report: How Can Indonesia Avoid the Middle Income Trap?

    World Bank Report: How Can Indonesia Avoid the Middle Income Trap

    On Monday (23/06), the World Bank released its latest analysis regarding the Indonesian economy. In its report, titled ‘Indonesia: Avoiding the Trap’, the World Bank states that Indonesia needs to implement a six reforms in priority areas in order to avoid the so-called middle income trap (referring to the situation where a country gets stuck at a certain income level). Without these critical reforms, the country’s economic growth will slow and may not be able to escape the middle income trap.

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  • Youth Unemployment in Indonesia: A Demographic Bonus or Disaster?

    Youth Unemployment in Indonesia: A Demographic Bonus or Disaster?

    High youth unemployment is one of the threats that is being faced by Indonesia. Indonesia has a young population as roughly half of the total population is below thirty years of age. This means that the country contains a potentially large workforce. But this demographic bonus can turn into a demographic disaster if this workforce cannot be absorbed by employment opportunities. The World Bank recently warned against Indonesia's high youth unemployment and misplaced focus on education spending.

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  • World Bank: East Asia Pacific at Work: Employment, Enterprise & Well-Being

    World Bank Report "East Asia Pacific at Work: Employment, Enterprise and Well-Being"

    As rapid economic development has pushed the percentage of people working in most East Asian countries to among the highest in the world, policy makers should enact labor regulations and social protection policies to benefit all workers, including those in the large informal economy, according to a new World Bank report, East Asia Pacific at Work: Employment, Enterprise and Well-Being (released on 8 May 2014). Current regulations, however, favor salaried, prime-age males at the expense of women and youth.

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