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Today's Headlines Debt

  • Taking a Look into Indonesia's Public Debt to GDP Ratio

    Taking a Look into Indonesia's Public Debt to GDP Ratio

    Indonesia's public debt - as a percentage of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP) - currently stands at 27 percent, or roughly IDR 3,200 trillion (approx. USD $241 billion). This debt is manageable and actually quite low compared to other key emerging economies or advanced economies. For example, Malaysia's and Brazil's public debt-to-GDP ratios reached 56 percent and 70 percent, respectively. Meanwhile, the ratios of the USA and Japan stand at 105 percent and 246 percent, respectively. However, the level of debt is not that important. The important question is how is this debt used?

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  • Indonesia Sees Peak in Maturing Debt Paper in 2016

    Indonesia Sees Peak in Maturing Debt Paper in 2016

    Although a huge amount of debt paper will mature in 2016, there is few concern that the Indonesian government and the nation's private companies will fail to meet their debt obligations. Per 17 February, total outstanding debt paper that is to mature in 2016 stands at IDR 320.9 trillion (approx. USD $23.8 billion), consisting of IDR 268.1 trillion (approx. USD $19.9 billion) of government bonds (Surat Utang Negara or SUN) and IDR 52.8 trillion (approx. USD $3.9 billion) of private sector corporate bonds. Why are there no major concerns about Indonesia's debt situation in 2016?

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  • Outstanding Government Debt Indonesia 27% of GDP in 2015

    Outstanding Government Debt Indonesia 27% of GDP in 2015

    Indonesia's outstanding government debt rose sharply. By the end of 2015, total government debt stood at IDR 3,089 trillion (approx. USD $222.2 billion), or 27 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) according to a statement from Indonesia's Finance Ministry. One year earlier - at end 2014 - the nation's debt-to-GDP ratio was 24.7 percent (or IDR 2,608.8 trillion). Ever since the end of the Asian Financial Crisis in the late 1990s, Indonesia's  debt-to-GDP ratio has eased from over 150 percent to a healthy range of 26-29 percent in recent years.

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  • Mergers and Acquisitions (M&A) in Indonesia Expected to Rise in 2016

    Mergers and Acquisitions (M&A) in Indonesia Expected to Rise in 2016

    RSM Indonesia, one of Indonesia's leading audit, tax and financial advisory firms, expects to see more mergers and acquisitions (M&A) in Indonesia in 2016 due to the improving global and domestic economic conditions, a stable rupiah exchange rate, and Indonesian's growing purchasing power. For foreign investors a M&A deal is one of the strategies to enter Indonesia. Up to early November, the total value of M&A deals in Indonesia in 2015 stood at USD $3.53 billion.

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  • Moody's Report: Indonesian Banks Can Weather Currency Volatility

    Moody's Report: Indonesian Banks Can Weather Currency Volatility

    In a new report US-based rating agency Moody's Investors Service says that Indonesian banks are strong enough to cope with ongoing currency volatility and sluggish economic growth. Although sharp rupiah depreciation does imply risks, "Indonesian banks seem manageable", Moody's Vice President and Senior Credit Officer Srikanth Vadlamani said, "as over 70 percent of local banks' debt constitutes related-party debt, implying minimal risks to the domestic banking system".

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  • Indonesia's Trikomsel Oke Bracing for Default on Singapore’s Bond Market

    Indonesia's Trikomsel Oke Bracing for Default on Singapore’s Bond Market

    Indonesia-based mobile phone retailer Trikomsel Oke informed its bondholders that it is bound to fail meeting interest payment obligations on two Singapore dollar-denominated bonds due in November and December 2015. The company, which been experiencing financial turmoil due to the depreciating rupiah, will submit debt restructuring proposals to its creditors in November. The looming default will be the first default in Singapore’s local currency corporate bond market since Celestial Nutrifoods Ltd and Sino-Environment Technology Group Ltd defaulted in 2009.

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  • Bank Indonesia: Still 320 Companies to Comply with Hedging Rules

    Bank Indonesia: Still 320 Companies to Comply with Hedging Rules

    Agus Martowardojo, Governor of the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia), said there are still 320 local companies that have not complied with the central banks' hedging requirements regarding foreign loans. A Bank Indonesia study conducted in late-2014 showed that the country’s private sector foreign debt is vulnerable to several risks i.e. currency risks, liquidity risks and overleverage risks due to unhedged loans.

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  • Public and Private Foreign Debt Growth Indonesia Slowed in July 2015

    Public and Private Foreign Debt Growth Indonesia Slowed in July 2015

    Indonesia’s foreign debt growth slowed in July 2015 by 3.7 percent (y/y) to a total of USD $303.7 billion from a 6.3 percent (y/y) growth pace in the preceding month. Based on the latest data from Indonesia’s central bank (Bank Indonesia) the nation’s total external debt consisted of USD $134.5 billion public sector foreign debt and USD $169.2 billion private sector foreign debt. Both public and private sector foreign debt growth slowed in July (compared to June) as these sectors were hesitant to take on more debt due to the depreciating rupiah.

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  • Indonesia Introduces Tighter Regulations Regarding Tax Deductible Interest Payments

    Indonesia Introduces Tighter Regulations Regarding Tax Deductible Interest Payments

    Starting per 1 January 2016, Indonesian companies’ interest payments to lenders are no longer considered tax deductible in case the company’s debt amounts to over four times its equity. Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro said such a tighter regulation regarding corporate debt financing will make it less attractive for local companies to accumulate debt, while strengthening the company's equity structure.

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Latest Columns Debt

  • Shares of Bakrie & Brothers Plunge after Reverse Stock Split

    Shares of Bakrie & Brothers Plunge after Reverse Stock Split

    Trading in shares of Bakrie & Brothers, which are listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange, have again been suspended by authorities (for the second time this month) due to a massive decline in the share price. The plunge occurred after Bakrie & Brothers conducted a 10:1 reverse stock split in late-May 2018. Through this corporate action the company reduced the total number of its outstanding shares.

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  • Indonesia's Bakrie & Brothers Offers Convertible Bonds to Creditors

    Indonesia's Bakrie & Brothers Offers Convertible Bonds to Creditors

    One of Indonesia's long standing companies - and also one of the most controversial ones in Indonesia - Bakrie & Brothers plans to offer part of its shares to creditors Mitsubishi Corporation, Glencore International, and Eurofa Capital Investment in a debt for equity swap. This plan is part of the company's efforts to restructure USD $453 million worth of debt through mandatory convertible bonds. Indra Ginting, Chief Investor Relation Officer at Bakrie & Brothers, confirmed the company owes Mitsubishi USD $150 million, Glencore USD $200 million, and Eurofa Capital USD $103 million.

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  • Reforming Indonesia's Tax System is Key to Unlock S&P's Investment Grade

    Reforming Indonesia's Tax System is Key to Unlock S&P's Investment Grade

    In the past two weeks, two of the big international credit rating agencies released new reports about Indonesia's fiscal situation. Both agencies affirmed Indonesia's sovereign debt rating: Fitch Ratings kept Indonesia at BBB-/stable (investment grade class) and Standard & Poor's (S&P) maintained Indonesia at BB+/positive (highest junk level, one notch below investment grade). S&P's decision to keep Indonesia within the junk level category was met with disappointment among investors and Indonesian government officials but perhaps not that surprisingly.

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  • Debt Restructuring Trikomsel Oke, S&P Warns of Indonesian Defaults

    Debt Restructuring Trikomsel Oke, S&P Warns of Indonesian Defaults

    American financial services company Standard & Poor's warns that defaults by Indonesian companies are a serious threat over the next 18 months given their eroded balance sheets amid the country's current economic slowdown. The warning came after Indonesian mobile phone retailer Trikomsel Oke announced plans to restructure about USD $155 million worth of debt as it may not be capable to meet obligations indefinitely.

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  • Foreign Debt Growth Indonesia Slows, What about the Interest Rate?

    Foreign Debt Growth Indonesia Slows, What about the Interest Rate?

    Bank Indonesia announced today that the country’s total foreign debt rose 7.6 percent (y/y) to USD $298.1 billion in the first quarter of 2015. This figure means that the pace of the country’s foreign debt growth has slowed from the 10.2 percentage point growth (y/y) that was recorded in the preceding quarter. Both public and private sector foreign debt growth slowed as both sectors are more careful to take up loans amid a weakening rupiah while export revenues decline amid sluggish global (and domestic) economic growth.

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  • Public and Private Debt Growth Indonesia Slowed in February 2015

    Public and Private Debt Growth Indonesia Slowed in February 2015

    On Friday (17/04) Indonesia’s central bank (Bank Indonesia) announced that the country’s foreign debt grew 9.4 percent (y/y) to USD $298.9 billion in February 2015, thus slower than the 10.5 percent (y/y) growth rate in the preceding month. Indonesia’s external debt growth slowed as both public and private sectors refrained from taking more debt. Public sector foreign debt grew 4.4 percent (y/y) to USD 134.8 billion, while private sector foreign debt rose 13.8 percent (y/y) to USD $164.1 billion in February.

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  • Growth Indonesia’s Foreign Debt Accelerated in November 2014

    Foreign debt of Indonesia accelerated 11.8 percent year-on-year (y/y) to USD $294.4 billion in November 2014. This total debt of USD $294.4 billion in November 2014 consists of public foreign debt of USD $133.9 billion and private foreign debt of USD $160.5 billion. The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) stated that public foreign debt rose 8.6 percent (y/y) mainly on a rise in foreign holdings on government debt securities. Meanwhile, the growth pace of private foreign debt slightly eased.

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  • Indonesia Investment Summit 2015: Structural Reforms Needed

    At the Indonesia Investment Summit 2015, organized in Jakarta on 15-16 January 2015, Bank Indonesia official Arief Mahmud presented several views of the central bank on the current Indonesian economy and the global and domestic challenges that it faces. As is widely known, Indonesia has been experiencing a process of slowing economic growth since 2011 due to sluggish global economic growth in combination with the rebalancing of the domestic economy. However, growth is expected to accelerate in 2015.

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  • Bank Indonesia Concerned about Level of Privately-Held Foreign Debt

    The central bank of Indonesia recently issued new regulations (Bank Indonesia Regulation No. 16/21/PBI/2014 and External Circular No. 16/24/DKEM) that aim to safeguard Indonesia’s financial fundamentals. These new regulations, which are an improvement of Bank Indonesia Regulation No. 16/20/PBI/2014 dated Oct. 28 2014, force Indonesian non-bank corporations to apply prudent fiscal management regarding foreign-denominated debt. Bank Indonesia felt these rules are needed as privately-held foreign debt rises continuously.

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