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Today's Headlines Tax Revenue

  • What You Need to Know about Indonesia's Excise on Plastic Packaging

    What You Need to Know about Indonesia's Excise on Plastic Packaging

    Before the end of 2016 the Indonesian government plans to have imposed a controversial excise on plastic packaging. Earlier this year the government had already suggested a IDR 200 (approx. USD $0.02) excise duty for food and beverage products wrapped in plastic packages. However, with all spotlights focused on Indonesia's tax amnesty program this plastic wrapping excise tax has been off analysts' radar. Lets take a closer look at this excise: what is it and why does the government of Southeast Asia's largest economy want to implement it?

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  • Tax Revenue Realization Indonesia Update: In Need of Revision

    Tax Revenue Realization Indonesia Update: In Need of Revision

    Up to 9 June 2016 tax revenue realization in Indonesia reached IDR 364.1 trillion (approx. USD $27.4 billion), or 29 percent of the target that was set in the 2016 State Budget. This disappointing score is the result of (1) a too ambitious tax income realization target set by the government, (2) low commodity prices (particularly crude oil; curbing tax income from the nation's exports), (3) taxpayers' tax restitution (which rose 32.5 percent y/y in the January-June period), and (4) Indonesia's slower-than-expected economic growth.

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  • S&P Keeps Indonesia's Sovereign Rating One Notch Below Investment Grade

    S&P Keeps Indonesia's Sovereign Rating One Notch Below Investment Grade

    Contrary to expectations, Standard & Poor's (S&P), the most conservative among the world's top three credit rating agencies, maintained Indonesia's sovereign debt rating at BB+ with a positive outlook. The BB+ rating is the highest junk level, one notch below investment grade. S&P left the door open for a future upgrade but the Indonesian government will need to enhance its fiscal performance. Issues that block an upgrade are rising budget deficits in the years ahead and the decline in Indonesia's corporate credit quality.

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  • Indonesia's Tax Amnesty Bill Needs more Deliberation

    Indonesia's Tax Amnesty Bill Needs more Deliberation

    Due to the lengthy talks needed among the Indonesian government and House of Representatives (DPR) about the Tax Amnesty Bill, there may be a further delay in implementing the bill that was originally planned to be implemented in early 2016. The government's proposed Tax Amnesty Bill offers low tax rates (and protection from prosecution) to those who declare untaxed wealth and repatriate their funds back to Indonesia. Through this bill the government aims to finance the widening budget deficit and obtain fresh tax revenue.

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  • Tax Amnesty Bill Indonesia: Banking Sector Prepares for High Liquidity

    Tax Amnesty Bill Indonesia: Banking Sector Prepares for High Liquidity

    Local media in Indonesia report that the Indonesian government has a list of 6,000 names of Indonesians that are ready to repatriate their funds in order to take advantage of the tax incentive provided by the Tax Amnesty Bill. This controversial bill, which is currently being discussed by Indonesia's House of Representatives (DPR), makes it attractive for tax evaders to repatriate their undeclared wealth into Indonesia as they are offered tax incentives and protection from prosecution.

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  • Indonesia May Impose Excise Tax on Plastic Bottles & Packaging

    Indonesia May Impose Excise Tax on Plastic Bottles & Packaging

    The government of Indonesia proposes to impose an excise tax of at least IDR 200 (approx. USD $0.02) on plastic bottles and packaging. This proposal is part of talks about revisions to the 2016 State Budget (APNB-P 2016). Later this week, the government will discuss the matter with Indonesia's House of Representatives (DPR). Around the globe several countries (including Great Britain and India) have imposed such an excise tax on plastic bottles and packages, both for additional tax revenue and as a measure to protect the environment.

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  • Weak Tax Collection, Indonesia Wants to Cut Government Spending

    Weak Tax Collection, Indonesia Wants to Cut Government Spending

    Due to weaker-than-expected revenue in 2016, the government of Indonesia has to cut government spending by IDR 50.6 trillion (approx. USD $3.8 billion) this year. Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro informed that the government is currently in the middle of discussing revisions of the 2016 State Budget (APBN 2016). Weaker-than-expected government revenue is primarily the cause of weaker-than-targeted tax revenue. The government will also revise its inflation, average rupiah rate, and average oil price targets. Despite the expected cut

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  • Indonesia to Raise Non-Taxable Income by 50% in 2016

    Indonesia to Raise Non-Taxable Income by 50% in 2016

    The government of Indonesia plans to raise non-taxable income by 50 percent from IDR 36 million (approx. USD $2,727) to IDR 54 million (approx. USD $4,090) in a bid to strengthen people's purchasing power and encourage household consumption. Although at first sight this move should lead to curtailed (income) tax collection, the Indonesian government expects that rising household consumption and investment will lead to higher value-added tax (VAT) and corporate income tax revenue. This should then add 0.16 percentage point to the nation's gross domestic product (GDP) growth.

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  • Indonesia's Tax Revenue Weak in Q1-2016, Plans Personal Income Tax Rate Cut

    Indonesia's Tax Revenue Weak in Q1-2016, Plans Personal Income Tax Rate Cut

    Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro announced on Tuesday (05/04) that Indonesia's tax revenue reached IDR 194 trillion (approx. USD $14.7 billion) in the first quarter of 2016, down 2.1 percent from tax revenue in the same period one year earlier. Brodjonegoro blamed this poor result on lower income from value-added taxes (VATs) due to tax restitution and people's low consumption amid sluggish economic growth. Meanwhile, he informed that Indonesia plans to cut the personal income tax, a move aimed at boosting tax compliance.

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  • Delayed Tax Amnesty Bill Talks Impact on Indonesia's Tax Target

    Delayed Tax Amnesty Bill Talks Impact on Indonesia's Tax Target

    After it was decided to postpone talks between the Indonesian government and the House of Representatives (DPR) about the tax amnesty bill (talks have been postponed until April 2016), the government is in need of formulating a new tax revenue target as the late implementation of the tax amnesty program could mean the government will miss out on tens of trillions of rupiah (billions of US dollars) in tax revenue this year. Indonesia's tax amnesty bill, proposed last year, will make it easier for tax evaders to come clean and repatriate their funds into Indonesia.

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Latest Columns Tax Revenue

  • State Budget Indonesia: Realization & Performance in Q1-2018

    State Budget Indonesia: Realization & Performance in Q1-2018

    The Indonesian government expects the nation's gross domestic product (GDP) to have expanded 5.2 percent year-on-year (y/y) in the first quarter of 2018. Indonesian Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati detects a strengthening domestic economy, supported by improved tax income and improved government spending in Q1-2018.

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  • Tax Revenue Indonesia: Another Tax Shortfall Expected in 2018

    Tax Revenue Indonesia: Another Tax Shortfall Expected in 2018

    Indonesia may see a IDR 120 trillion (approx. USD $8.8 billion) tax shortfall in 2017. The Indonesian government set a IDR 1,472.7 trillion (approx. USD $109 billion) tax revenue target (including customs and duties) in full-year 2017. However, up to 15 December only IDR 1,211.5 trillion has been collected. Traditionally Indonesia delivers a tax shortfall at the end of the year. This is expected to continue in 2018.

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  • Tax Amnesty Program Indonesia Ended, What Are the Results?

    Tax Amnesty Program Indonesia Ended, What Are the Results?

    Indonesia's tax amnesty program ended on 31 March 2017, so now it is time to take a look at the results. Although Indonesia's amnesty program has been labelled as one of the most - if not the most - successful amnesty programs ever around the globe (in terms of asset declarations), there is plenty of room for disappointment. Based on data from Indonesia's Tax Office, less than one million Indonesians joined the program. For many nations this would be a great number. For Indonesia this number means tax evasion remains rampant, implying the government misses out on much-needed tax revenue.

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  • Indonesia's Tax Amnesty Program to End Soon, Any Structural Impact?

    Indonesia's Tax Amnesty Program to End Soon, Any Structural Impact?

    Indonesia's tax amnesty program will end soon. The nine-month program was designed to finish on 31 March 2017. Although the program has become the world's most successful tax amnesty program, it will fail to solve Indonesia's tax revenue collection problems. And with tax revenue being the largest source for public spending capacity, low tax compliance in Southeast Asia's largest economy obstructs more rapid development of the Indonesian economy.

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  • Budget Deficit of Indonesia Under Control Thanks to Tax Amnesty

    Budget Deficit of Indonesia Under Control Thanks to Tax Amnesty

    Indonesia's budget deficit in 2016 is estimated to have reached 2.46 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP), below the government's forecast of 2.7 percent of GDP and at a safe distance from the legal cap of 3.0 percent of GDP that is stipulated by Indonesian law. This is a positive matter that is supported by modestly growing tax revenue. In full-year 2016 tax revenue realization reached IDR 1,105.2 trillion (approx. USD $83 billion), only 81.6 percent of the target that was set in the Revised 2016 State Budget (APBN-P 2016) but slightly higher than tax revenue realization in the preceding year.

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  • Weak Tax Revenue Indonesia in 1H-2016, Spotlight on Tax Amnesty

    Weak Tax Revenue Indonesia in 1H-2016, Spotlight on Tax Amnesty

    Indonesia's tax revenue realization in the first half of 2016 was disappointing. According to the latest data, Southeast Asia's largest economy collected a total of IDR 518.4 trillion (approx. USD $39.6 billion) worth of tax revenue (including customs and excise) in the first six months of 2016, down 3.3 percent (y/y) from tax revenue realization in the same period one year earlier, and only 33.7 percent of total targeted tax revenue (IDR 1,539.2 trillion) set in the revised 2016 State Budget. The disappointing performance is mainly due to weak tax income from the oil and gas sector.

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  • Tax Amnesty Program Indonesia Launched: Which Investment Instruments?

    Tax Amnesty Program Indonesia Launched: Which Investment Instruments?

    Without giving too much insight into the details and regulations, Indonesian President Joko Widodo launched the tax amnesty program on Friday (01/07) during a speech in front of hundreds of businessmen and officials at Indonesia's tax office headquarters in Jakarta. The tax amnesty program - approved by the House of Representatives in late June - is a strategy to boost state tax income by (temporarily) granting amnesty as well as offering attractive incentives to (former) tax evaders. In return, the tax dodgers have to declare and (if wanted) repatriate their offshore assets into Indonesia.

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  • Reforming Indonesia's Tax System is Key to Unlock S&P's Investment Grade

    Reforming Indonesia's Tax System is Key to Unlock S&P's Investment Grade

    In the past two weeks, two of the big international credit rating agencies released new reports about Indonesia's fiscal situation. Both agencies affirmed Indonesia's sovereign debt rating: Fitch Ratings kept Indonesia at BBB-/stable (investment grade class) and Standard & Poor's (S&P) maintained Indonesia at BB+/positive (highest junk level, one notch below investment grade). S&P's decision to keep Indonesia within the junk level category was met with disappointment among investors and Indonesian government officials but perhaps not that surprisingly.

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