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Today's Headlines Credit

  • Bank Indonesia Positive about Banking Sector in 2016, Fitch Doubts

    Bank Indonesia Positive about Banking Sector in 2016, Fitch Doubts

    The banking sector of Indonesia is expected to rebound in 2016 due to the lower primary reserve requirement ratio for rupiah deposits (6.5 percent), lower cost of funds as well as operational costs, rising credit volume (due to the lower interest rate environment) and improving purchasing power. The banking sector is also expected to feel the positive impact of the stimulus packages unveiled by the Indonesian government aimed at strengthening domestic businesses and improve the investment climate. And lastly, banks are to benefit from the government's push for infrastructure development.

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  • Which Indonesian Banks Are Ready for Lower Net Interest Margin (NIM)?

    Which Indonesian Banks Are Ready for Lower Net Interest Margin (NIM)?

    In anticipation of the Financial Services Authority's new policy, Indonesian banks categorized under BUKU III claim to be ready for a lower net interest margin (NIM). NIM is the difference between interest income generated by banks and the amount of interest paid out to the lenders. BUKU (Bank Umum Kelompok Usaha) is a categorization system, designed by Bank Indonesia, that divides Indonesian banks into four categories based on the banks' capital. Banks categorized under BUKU III have capital between IDR 5 trillion (approx. USD $373 million) and IDR 30 trillion (approx. USD $2.2 billion).

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  • Financial Authorities to Cut Indonesia's Lending & Mortgage Rates

    Financial Authorities to Cut Indonesia's Lending & Mortgage Rates

    The Indonesian government, central bank (Bank Indonesia) and the Financial Services Authority (OJK) have formed a team that will study and encourage lower lending and mortgage rates in Indonesia - to single digit levels - by the end of 2016. Indonesia's Chief Economics Minister Darmin Nasution explained that this is part of government efforts to boost economic activity in Southeast Asia's largest economy. Indonesia's lending rates have been high due to banks' prudent management and the high cost of funds, hence limiting credit growth as well as economic growth.

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  • Indonesian Banks Look at Food & Beverage Sector for 2016 Credit Growth

    Indonesian Banks Look at Food & Beverage Sector for 2016 Credit Growth

    Besides infrastructure, Indonesia's food and beverage sector remains a favorite of Indonesian banks for the disbursement of loans in 2016 as this sector is regarded promising. Meanwhile, a good supply of food products also supports a stable inflation rate (apart from administered prices, volatile food prices are a key contributor to inflation in Indonesia). Roy Armand Arfandi, General Director of Bank Permata, said Indonesia's economic growth is still highly dependent on people's purchasing power (household consumption accounting for nearly 56 percent of the nation's GDP), hence those sectors that support domestic consumption are attractive for banks.

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  • In Line with Slowing Economy, Indonesia's Credit Growth Slowed in 2015

    In Line with Slowing Economy, Indonesia's Credit Growth Slowed in 2015

    As expected, credit growth in Indonesia slowed in 2015 amid the nation's overall economic slowdown. Loan growth was particularly affected by weaker demand for property and working capital loans. Indonesia's gross domestic product (GDP) growth in 2015 is estimated to have slowed to 4.7 percent year-on-year (y/y), the country's slowest growth pace since 2009. In its January policy meeting Bank Indonesia decided to cut its key interest rate by 25 basis points to 7.25 percent, a move that should encourage loan growth this year in Southeast Asia's largest economy.

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  • Credit Growth Indonesia to Fall Short of Bank Indonesia Target

    Credit Growth Indonesia to Fall Short of Bank Indonesia Target

    Bank Indonesia, the central bank of Indonesia, expects banks' credit growth realization to reach 9-10 percent (y/y) in 2015, below its target of 11-13 percent (y/y). Up to October 2015 Indonesian banks' credit growth stood at 10.4 percent, slowing from 11.1 percent in the preceding month. Juda Agung, Executive Director of Economic and Monetary Policy Department Bank Indonesia, said slowing credit growth is in line with the economic slowdown.

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  • Fitch Ratings: Systemic Risks in Indonesian Banking System Declined

    Fitch Ratings: Systemic Risks in Indonesian Banking System Declined

    Global credit rating agency Fitch Ratings expects slowing credit growth in Indonesia to reduce systemic risks in the country’s banking sector. In a report entitled Macro-Prudential Risk Monitor, which was released on 3 March 2015, it was mentioned that the macro-prudential risk indicator (MPI) for Indonesia was lowered from '3' (high risk) to '2' (moderate risk). Primary reason for this risk cut was the slowdown in the country's real credit expansion to below 5 percent in 2014 (from a peak of almost 20 percent in 2011).

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  • Financial Update Indonesia: Credit Growth, Bad Loans and Retail Sales

    The central bank of Indonesia projects non-performing loans (NPL) to rise to 2.4 percent of the country’s total outstanding loans by the end of the year, significantly up from 1.8 percent at the end of last year. Despite the acceleration of bad loans in Indonesia, the institution stated that it is still manageable. Meanwhile, loan growth in Indonesia is estimated to slow to 11 or 12 percent (y/y) by the end of 2014 (the slowest pace since 2010), down from 21.4 percent (y/y) in 2013 primarily due to the central bank’s monetary tightening policy.

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  • World Bank Indonesia Economic Quarterly: Structural Reforms Needed

    The World Bank revised down its forecast for economic growth in Indonesia for the year 2014. In the July 2014 edition of the Indonesia Economic Quarterly, the institution projects economic growth in Southeast Asia’s largest economy at 5.2 percent, slightly down from its previous forecast of 5.3 percent. The downgrade is the result of a weaker outlook for commodity prices and tighter credit conditions. Moreover, the growing fiscal deficit contributes to the challenges that will be faced by the new government (which will be inaugurated in October 2014).

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  • Bank Dinar Indonesia Sets Share Price for IPO on Indonesia Stock Exchange

    Bank Dinar Indonesia announced to set its share price at IDR 110 per share at the initial public offering (IPO) on the Indonesia Stock Exchange. The company hopes to raise IDR 55 billion (USD $4.6 million) by offering 500 million new shares, or 22.22 percent of its enlarged capital, to the public. Approximately 75 percent of the proceeds will be used for credit disbursement expansion, while the remainder will be used to finance the establishment of nine new offices. Underwriter of the IPO is Andalan Artha Advisindo Sekuritas.

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Latest Columns Credit

  • Rapid Development of Fintech Industry in Indonesia

    Rapid Development of Fintech Industry in Indonesia

    Rapid development of financial technology (fintech), which involves the delivery of financial services that use the latest technology and innovation to compete with the world's traditional financial methods, is also visible in Indonesia.

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  • Bank Indonesia Ending the Era of High Interest Rates?

    Bank Indonesia Ending the Era of High Interest Rates?

    Bank Indonesia (BI) is the central bank of the Republic of Indonesia, and was known as "De Javasche bank" or "The Java Bank" in the colonial period.  Bank Indonesia was founded on 1 July 1953 from the nationalization of De Javasche Bank. As an independent state institution, Bank Indonesia is fully autonomous in formulating and implementing each of its assumed tasks and most policy goals tend to center around the ability to stabilize prices in the economy.

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  • Low Credit Growth in Indonesia, but Micro Credit Program (KUR) on Course

    Low Credit Growth in Indonesia, but Micro Credit Program (KUR) on Course

    Although generally credit growth in Indonesia has been weak so far this year, disbursement of micro credit (in Indonesian: Kredit Usaha Rakyat, or KUR) has been solid in the first eight months of the year. KUR is a government-sponsored subsidy offered to the country’s smallest entrepreneurs (for example street food vendors). Through KUR, Indonesia’s commercial banks can provide working capital at lower interest rates (compared to most other micro loans). This is made possible by an insurance plan involving state-owned insurance firms Perum Jamkrindo and Askrindo.

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  • Projection for Credit Growth in Indonesia Cut Again

    Projection for Credit Growth in Indonesia Cut Again

    Bank Indonesia cut its projection for credit growth in the nation's banking sector this year from the range of 10 - 11 percent year-on-year (y/y) to 7 - 9 percent (y/y). This downward revision is in line with the central bank's earlier decision to cut its forecast for economic growth from the range of 5.0 - 5.4 percent (y/y) to 4.9 - 5.3 percent (y/y) in 2016. The slightly less rosy outlook is caused by the Indonesian government's decision to cut spending for the remainder of the year, while global economic growth remains subdued.

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  • Indonesian Financial Institutions in Focus: Bank Tabungan Negara

    Indonesian Financial Institutions in Focus: Bank Tabungan Negara

    Indonesian listed financial institution Bank Tabungan Negara should benefit from the government's Housing Loan Liquidity Facility (in Indonesian: Fasilitas Likuiditas Pembiayaan Perumahan, or FLPP), a government-subsidized mortgage program for those low-income citizens who have never bought a house before. This scheme should boost House Ownership Credit (Kredit Pemilikan Rumah, or KPR) in Southeast Asia's largest economy. Good news for Bank Tabungan Negara, which is the market leader in Indonesia's mortgage loans sector.

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  • Financial Update: Bank Indonesia Sees No Need to Alter Interest Rates

    At Bank Indonesia’s Board of Governors’ meeting, convened today (10/07), it was decided to keep the country’s benchmark interest rate (BI rate) at 7.50 percent, and the Lending Facility and Deposit Facility rates held at 7.50 percent and 5.75 percent, respectively. According to the central bank this policy is consistent with efforts to steer inflation back towards the target corridor of 4.5±1 percent in 2014 and 4.0±1 percent in 2015, as well as to reduce the current account deficit to a more sustainable level.

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  • What are the Best Performing Indonesian Stocks so Far in 2014?

    What are the Best Performing Indonesian Stocks so Far in 2014?

    Regarding stock trading on the Indonesia Stock Exchange, investors who focused on property, banking and infrastructure stocks have made the highest profit so far in 2014. Although all sectoral indices that are contained within the benchmark stock index of Indonesia, known as the Jakarta Composite Index (abbreviated IHSG) have shown a good performance, the three aforementioned sectoral indices stand out as the country's top performers. Indonesia's IHSG has risen 16.14 percent between 1 January and 26 May 2014.

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  • Official Press Release Bank Indonesia: BI Rate Maintained at 7.50%

    Official Press Release Bank Indonesia: BI Rate Maintained at 7.50%

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) decided at today’s Bank Indonesia Board of Governors’ Meeting, convened on 8 May 2014, to maintain the country's benchmark interest rate (BI rate) at 7.50 percent, with the Lending Facility rate and Deposit Facility rate held at 7.50 percent and 5.75 percent respectively. This policy is consistent with efforts to steer the rate of inflation towards its target corridor of 4.5±1 percent in 2014 and 4.0±1 percent in 2015, as well as to reduce the current account deficit to a more sustainable level.

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  • Indonesia Financial Market Update: Indonesia's Current Account Deficit

    Currently, one of Indonesia's main financial issues (and one which puts serious pressures on the Indonesian rupiah exchange rate) is the country's wide current account deficit. According to data from Statistics Indonesia, Indonesia's current account deficit totaled USD $8.4 billion in the third quarter of 2013. This figure is equivalent to a whopping 3.8 percent of Indonesia's gross domestic product (GDP). Generally, a current account deficit that exceeds 2.5 percent of GDP is considered unsustainable.

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  • Property Sector of Indonesia: Still Rising but Growth Slows Temporarily

    Property Sector of Indonesia: Still Rising but Growth Slows Temporarily

    According to Ferry Salanto, Associate Research Director at Colliers International Indonesia, the weakening rupiah exchange rate against the US dollar in recent months has resulted in an increase of property sales in Indonesia, particularly apartments. Salanto says it is not just an investment for the buyer but also a matter of security. Property is currently a better and safer alternative to the holding of rupiahs. In the third quarter of 2013, property sales increased despite the higher benchmark interest rate and the tightening property credit environment.

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