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Today's Headlines Interest Rates

  • Bank Indonesia Kept Key Interest Rate at 4.25% in October 2017

    Bank Indonesia Kept Key Interest Rate at 4.25% in October 2017

    Bank Indonesia held its key rate at 4.25 percent at the October 2017 policy meeting. This decision was in line with expectations. In fact, previously, Bank Indonesia officials had already indicated that they would pause their eagerness to ease monetary policy. Since January 2016, the central bank of Indonesia had already cut the benchmark interest rate eight times from 7.25 percent to 4.25 percent in an effort to boost economic growth.

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  • Bank Indonesia Leaves Monetary Policy Unchanged at July Meeting

    Bank Indonesia Leaves Monetary Policy Unchanged at July Meeting

    Indonesia's central bank (Bank Indonesia) concluded its Board of Governors Meeting later than usual on Thursday evening (20/07). However, there were no surprises. At the July policy meeting Bank Indonesia decided to keep its benchmark interest rate - the 7-day reverse repurchase rate - at 4.75 percent, in line with analyst estimates. Meanwhile, the deposit facility and lending facility were kept at 4.00 percent and 5.50 percent, respectively, effective per 21 Juli 2017.

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  • Credit Growth in Indonesia Remained Flat in September 2016

    Credit Growth in Indonesia Remained Flat in September 2016

    Credit growth in Indonesia is expected to have continued its slide in Q3-2016. On an annual basis, credit growth may have eased to 6 percent. Bank Indonesia, the nation's central bank, still upholds its 2016 credit growth target of 7-9 percent (y/y) as it eyes an improvement in credit disbursement in the last quarter of the year. Slowing corporate credit growth signals that firms are less enthusiastic to engage in business expansion and investment, while easing individual credit growth implies that consumers are less eager to obtain loans for the purchase of property, cars and motorcycles.

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  • Bank Indonesia Cuts Key Interest Rate (BI Rate) to 6.50% in June

    Bank Indonesia Cuts Key Interest Rate (BI Rate) to 6.50% in June

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) cut its key interest rate (BI rate) by 0.25 percentage point to 6.50 percent at Thursday's policy meeting (16/06). Although the central bank had stated at its preceding policy meeting that there remained room for monetary easing, today's move was a surprise that few analysts saw coming. The 7-day reverse repurchase rate, which is set to become the central bank's new benchmark rate on 19 August, was also cut by 25 basis points (to 5.25 percent) at today's policy meeting.

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  • Indonesian Banks Reject Lower Net Interest Margin Plan

    Indonesian Banks Reject Lower Net Interest Margin Plan

    Indonesian banks support the country's financial authorities' intention to cut lending rates to single digit margins (in a bid to boost credit growth and economic activity). However, these banks argue that lower interest rates should be the result of enhanced efficiency at banks, not by the Financial Services Authority (OJK)'s plan to cut banks' net interest margin (NIM). Earlier this year, the OJK - the government agency that regulates and supervises Indonesia's financial services sector - announced its plan to push state-owned banks' NIM down to the range of 3 to 4 percent.

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  • Bank Indonesia's Rate Cut Boosts Optimism for Economic Growth

    Bank Indonesia's Rate Cut Boosts Optimism for Economic Growth

    In the first three monthly policy meetings this year (January-March) the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) cut borrowing costs by a total of 75 basis points. Indonesia's benchmark interest rate (BI rate) was cut from 7.50 percent at the year-start to 6.75 percent at Thursday's Board of Governors' meeting. The overnight deposit facility rate and lending facility rate were also cut by 75 basis points, each, in the first three months. The lower interest rate environment in Indonesia signals that the financial fundamentals are strong. This is partly reason behind strong inflows of foreign capital into Southeast Asia's largest economy.

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  • Indonesian Stocks down on Selloff Bank Stocks & Oil Price

    Indonesian Stocks down on Selloff Bank Stocks & Oil Price

    Most Asian stock markets fell on Tuesday (23/02) on extended concerns about the world's low crude oil prices and China's economic slowdown. Indonesia's benchmark Jakarta Composite Index (IHSG) plunged 1.16 percent to 4,654.05 points, leading declines in Asia as the nation's banking shares were also affected by local financial authorities' plans to curtail the net interest margin in order to bring down Indonesian banks' lending rates and boost credit expansion in Southeast Asia's largest economy.

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  • Financial Authorities to Cut Indonesia's Lending & Mortgage Rates

    Financial Authorities to Cut Indonesia's Lending & Mortgage Rates

    The Indonesian government, central bank (Bank Indonesia) and the Financial Services Authority (OJK) have formed a team that will study and encourage lower lending and mortgage rates in Indonesia - to single digit levels - by the end of 2016. Indonesia's Chief Economics Minister Darmin Nasution explained that this is part of government efforts to boost economic activity in Southeast Asia's largest economy. Indonesia's lending rates have been high due to banks' prudent management and the high cost of funds, hence limiting credit growth as well as economic growth.

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  • Bank Indonesia Cuts BI Rate to 7%, Reserve Requirement to 6.5%

    Bank Indonesia Cuts BI Rate to 7%, Reserve Requirement to 6.5%

    In line with expectations, the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) cut its benchmark interest rate (BI rate) by 25 basis points to 7.0 percent at its February Board of Governor's policy meeting. Its overnight deposit facility rate (known as Fasbi) and lending facility rate were also cut by 0.25 percent to 5.00 percent and 7.50 percent, respectively. After the rate cut in January it was the second straight month of lower borrowing costs in Southeast Asia's largest economy. Meanwhile, Bank Indonesia also cut the reserve-requirement ratio for rupiah deposits at commercial banks by 100 basis points to 6.5 percent.

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  • Bank Indonesia Keeps Key BI Rate at 7.50% in October Policy Meeting

    Bank Indonesia Keeps Key BI Rate at 7.50% in October Policy Meeting

    As expected, the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) left its benchmark interest rate (BI rate) unchanged at 7.50 percent at the October Board of Governor's meeting on Thursday (15/10). Meanwhile, Bank Indonesia maintained the deposit facility rate and the lending facility rate at 5.50 percent and 8.00 percent, respectively. Rates were left unchanged as the global economic outlook remains highly uncertain. This jeopardizes the stability of the Indonesian rupiah.

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Latest Columns Interest Rates

  • Bank Indonesia May Not Cut Interest Rates Further for a Long Time

    Bank Indonesia May Not Cut Interest Rates Further for a Long Time

    Bank Indonesia, the central bank of Indonesia, decided to maintain its benchmark interest rate, the BI 7-day (Reverse) Repo Rate (BI-7 day RR Rate), at 4.75 percent at the February 2017 policy meeting as Indonesia's inflation rate is expected to rise amid growing domestic demand and administered price adjustments, while the central bank also tries to mitigate the impact of looming normalization of US interest rates (expected later this year). Meanwhile, Bank Indonesia kept its deposit facility and lending facility rates at 4.00 percent and 5.50 percent, respectively.

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  • Bank Indonesia Kept Interest Rates Unchanged on Capital Outflow Risk

    Bank Indonesia Kept Interest Rates Unchanged on Capital Outflow Risk

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) decided to leave its interest rate environment unchanged at the January 2017 policy meeting on Thursday (19/01). The benchmark seven-day reverse repurchase rate (BI 7-day RR Rate) was kept at 4.75 percent, while the Deposit Facility and Lending Facility rates were maintained at 4.00 percent and 5.50 percent, respectively. The decisions of Bank Indonesia are in line with analysts' forecasts. Due to risks of capital outflows Indonesia's central bank had few room to ease monetary policy.

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  • Impact of Fed's Interest Rate Hike on the Value of Indonesia's Rupiah

    Impact of Fed's Interest Rate Hike on the Value of Indonesia's Rupiah

    Stock markets in Asia are mixed, yet tepid on Friday (16/12) after the US Federal Reserve raised its interest rate regime for the second time in a decade on Wednesday (14/12). Although the Fed's move was widely anticipated (and therefore already "priced in" to a high degree) it still resulted in some capital outflows from Asia's stock markets on Thursday (13/12). Japan, as usual, is the notable exception as US dollar strength (or yen weakness) makes Japan's export-oriented stocks more attractive.

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  • Bank Indonesia Keeps Interest Rate Unchanged at December Meeting

    Bank Indonesia Keeps Interest Rate Unchanged at December Meeting

    Bank Indonesia, the central bank of Indonesia, kept its benchmark interest rate unchanged at the December 2016 policy meeting, nearly a day after the US Federal Reserve decided to raise its key Fed Funds Rate by 25 basis points to the range 0.50 - 0.75 percent. Moves of both central banks were expected. Monetary tightening in the USA triggers capital outflows from emerging markets (the Indonesian rupiah depreciated around 0.70 percent against the US dollar on Thursday). Therefore, Bank Indonesia had little room to seek monetary easing.

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  • Bank of Indonesia: Assessing Impact of Sudden Rate Cut

    Bank of Indonesia: Assessing Impact of Sudden Rate Cut

    The Bank of Indonesia recently resorted to a sudden cut in interest rate (by 25 bps to 4.75 percent) at its 20th October 2016 meeting. This followed a 25 bps reduction in September and thus this is the sixth time this year that the Indonesian central bank has elected to loosen monetary policy.

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  • Bank Indonesia Ending the Era of High Interest Rates?

    Bank Indonesia Ending the Era of High Interest Rates?

    Bank Indonesia (BI) is the central bank of the Republic of Indonesia, and was known as "De Javasche bank" or "The Java Bank" in the colonial period.  Bank Indonesia was founded on 1 July 1953 from the nationalization of De Javasche Bank. As an independent state institution, Bank Indonesia is fully autonomous in formulating and implementing each of its assumed tasks and most policy goals tend to center around the ability to stabilize prices in the economy.

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  • Bank Indonesia Cut Interest Rates Again in October 2016

    Bank Indonesia Cut Interest Rates Again in October 2016

    Bank Indonesia surprised markets. On Thursday (20/10) the central bank of Southeast Asia's largest economy cut its benchmark interest rate - the BI 7-day reverse repo rate - by 25 basis points to 4.75 percent. Meanwhile, both the deposit facility and lending facility were also cut by 25 basis points to 4.00 percent and 5.50 percent, respectively. Perhaps it was Bank Indonesia's present to Indonesian President Joko Widodo for the two-year anniversary of his government. A lower interest rate climate should encourage macroeconomic expansion.

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  • What Is Next For Indonesian Interest Rates?

    What Is Next For Indonesian Interest Rates?

    On September 22, 2016, the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) decided to cut its BI seven-day repo rate from 5.25 percent to 5.00 percent, and this has changed parts of the long-term outlook for investors. Bank Indonesia also reduced its lending rate to 5.75 percent (from previous 5.50 percent), and the deposit rate to 4.50 percent (from previous 4.75 percent previously). This is significant because it shows that lending rates and interest rates have dropped to multi-year lows with the current policy changes.

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  • Projection for Credit Growth in Indonesia Cut Again

    Projection for Credit Growth in Indonesia Cut Again

    Bank Indonesia cut its projection for credit growth in the nation's banking sector this year from the range of 10 - 11 percent year-on-year (y/y) to 7 - 9 percent (y/y). This downward revision is in line with the central bank's earlier decision to cut its forecast for economic growth from the range of 5.0 - 5.4 percent (y/y) to 4.9 - 5.3 percent (y/y) in 2016. The slightly less rosy outlook is caused by the Indonesian government's decision to cut spending for the remainder of the year, while global economic growth remains subdued.

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