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Today's Headlines Agus Martowardojo

  • Bank Indonesia Concerned about the Impact of Floods on Inflation

    Bank Indonesia Concerned about the Impact of Floods on Inflation

    Bank Indonesia, the central bank of Indonesia, is concerned that the ongoing flooding that occurs in several regions of the country will give rise to inflationary pressures as some distribution channels are blocked. Besides logistics issues, severe rainfall can disturb harvests hence impacting negatively on the supply-side. In several parts of Indonesia, including the capital city of Jakarta and the northern part of Central Java, there are reports of major floods.

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  • Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 2.4% of GDP in 2017

    Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 2.4% of GDP in 2017

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects Indonesia's current account deficit (CAD) to widen to 2.4 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP), or about USD $23 billion, in 2017. Therefore, Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo said the CAD remains one of the bigger challenges for Indonesia in the foreseeable future. In 2016 the nation's CAD had in fact eased to 1.8 percent of GDP (or USD $17 billion) on the back of a big improvement in the last quarter of 2016.

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  • Bank Indonesia Sees Widening Current Account Deficit in 2017

    Bank Indonesia Sees Widening Current Account Deficit in 2017

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects the nation's current account deficit to widen to 2.4 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2017 due to expectation of rising imports in Indonesia this year. These rising imports come on the back of growing investment realization in Southeast Asia's largest economy. This projection is significantly higher compared to the estimated USD $17 billion, or 1.8 percent of GDP, current account deficit in 2016.

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  • Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 2.2% of GDP in FY-2016

    Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 2.2% of GDP in FY-2016

    Bank Indonesia, the central bank of Indonesia, expects the country's current account deficit to increase to USD $4.8 billion - or about 2.2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) - in full-year 2016. Although the deficit remains high - and is forecast to go higher - there is optimism that this increase is caused by rising imports of capital goods and raw materials. These goods and materials are used to manufacture new products (that may be exported from Indonesia) and therefore have a positive impact on the economy (in contrast to consumer product imports that bring few future economic value).

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  • Bank Indonesia: Room for Monetary Easing in Indonesia

    Bank Indonesia: Room for Monetary Easing in Indonesia

    Agus Martowardojo, Governor of Indonesia's central bank (Bank Indonesia), says there remains room for monetary easing in Southeast Asia's largest economy in the last few months of 2016, provided that both the domestic and global context remain conducive. However, Martowardojo did not specify what this monetary easing exactly entails: a lower key interest rate, cutting the primary minimum statutory reserves (in Indonesian: giro wajib minimum primer), or macro-prudential policy easing? Whatever the move may be, it will for sure be data-dependent, Martowardojo emphasized.

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  • Bank Indonesia Pessimistic about Fruits of Tax Amnesty Program

    Bank Indonesia Pessimistic about Fruits of Tax Amnesty Program

    The governor of Indonesia's central bank (Bank Indonesia), Agus Martowardojo, stated that he has become highly skeptical about the government's tax amnesty program that was launched in July. At a parliamentary hearing on Wednesday (07/09), Martowardojo said the central bank only expects to see IDR 21 billion (approx. USD $1.6 billion) in additional tax revenue through the amnesty program for the state and only USD $13.8 billion in repatriated funds. These new projections are significantly below the central bank's earlier projections.

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  • Sri Mulyani Indrawati's Thoughts about Indonesia's Economic Growth

    Sri Mulyani Indrawati's Thoughts about Indonesia's Economic Growth

    According to Indonesian Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati the economy of Indonesia will grow 5.1 percent (y/y) in 2016, slightly below the target that was set by the central government in the 2016 State Budget (5.2 percent y/y). This slightly less rosy view is caused by the decision to cut government spending by IDR 137.6 trillion (approx. USD $10.4 billion) this year in order to combat a widening budget deficit (that is mainly caused by weaker-than-targeted tax revenue). A cut in state spending means that the government has less funds to boost economic growth.

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  • Bank Indonesia Sees GDP Growth at 4.9% - 5.3% in 2016

    Bank Indonesia Sees GDP Growth at 4.9% - 5.3% in 2016

    At the latest policy meeting, Indonesia's central bank (Bank Indonesia) not only adopted a new benchmark monetary tool (the BI seven-day reverse repo rate) but also announced that it cut its forecast for economic growth in 2016. Earlier, Bank Indonesia estimated Indonesia's GDP growth in full-year 2016 in the range of 5.0 - 5.4 percent (y/y). However, it slightly cut its projection to the range of 4.9 - 5.3 percent (y/y) due to the government's decision to curtail expenditure by IDR 133.8 trillion (approx. USD $10.1 billion).

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  • Bank Indonesia Sees Easing Global Pressures & Controlled Inflation

    Bank Indonesia Sees Easing Global Pressures & Controlled Inflation

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) sees easing pressures in the global economy in May 2016, reflected by the rising crude oil price. On Thursday (26/05), crude futures exceeded the USD $50 per barrel level for the first time since November 2015 (supported by production disruptions in Canada). Although oil futures declined again the following day on profit taking, the rising trend has persisted. In early 2016 crude oil traded below USD $30 a barrel, plunging some 21 months due to the global supply glut and weak global economic growth.

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  • Indonesia Needs to Work Hard to Achieve 2016 Economic Growth Target

    Indonesia Needs to Work Hard to Achieve 2016 Economic Growth Target

    Indonesian President Joko Widodo has formed a task force that is tasked to monitor the full implementation of Indonesia's 12 economic policy packages throughout the nation. Since September 2015 the government of Indonesia has been unveiling a series of economic policy packages that include tax incentives, deregulation as well as logistics solutions with the overall aim of boosting economic growth. However, businessmen have complained about the weak implementation of these packages. This may also explain why Indonesia's economic growth in Q1-2016 was weaker-than-expected.

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Latest Columns Agus Martowardojo

  • Bank Indonesia Conducts Ad Hoc Press Conference on Rupiah Movement

    Bank Indonesia Conducts Ad Hoc Press Conference on Rupiah Movement

    In an ad hoc press conference on Thursday (26/04) Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo provided an update on the performance of the Indonesian rupiah as well as an update on the strategies that are - or can be - used by the central bank to safeguard a stable rupiah. When the ad hoc press conference was announced we initially expected to see an interest rate hike. However, based on a statement from Bank Indonesia, this seems to be the last option the central bank wants to use.

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  • Bank Indonesia May Not Cut Interest Rates Further for a Long Time

    Bank Indonesia May Not Cut Interest Rates Further for a Long Time

    Bank Indonesia, the central bank of Indonesia, decided to maintain its benchmark interest rate, the BI 7-day (Reverse) Repo Rate (BI-7 day RR Rate), at 4.75 percent at the February 2017 policy meeting as Indonesia's inflation rate is expected to rise amid growing domestic demand and administered price adjustments, while the central bank also tries to mitigate the impact of looming normalization of US interest rates (expected later this year). Meanwhile, Bank Indonesia kept its deposit facility and lending facility rates at 4.00 percent and 5.50 percent, respectively.

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  • Bank Indonesia Cut Interest Rates Again in October 2016

    Bank Indonesia Cut Interest Rates Again in October 2016

    Bank Indonesia surprised markets. On Thursday (20/10) the central bank of Southeast Asia's largest economy cut its benchmark interest rate - the BI 7-day reverse repo rate - by 25 basis points to 4.75 percent. Meanwhile, both the deposit facility and lending facility were also cut by 25 basis points to 4.00 percent and 5.50 percent, respectively. Perhaps it was Bank Indonesia's present to Indonesian President Joko Widodo for the two-year anniversary of his government. A lower interest rate climate should encourage macroeconomic expansion.

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  • Bank Indonesia Cuts Key Interest Rates Again in September

    Bank Indonesia Cuts Key Interest Rates Again in September

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) cut its benchmark BI 7-day Reverse Repo rate (RR rate) by 25 basis points to 5 percent at the policy meeting that was concluded on Thursday (22/09). The lender of last resort also cut the Deposit and Lending Facility rates¹ by 25 basis points to 4.25 percent and 5.75 percent, respectively. Given the stable domestic economy, Bank Indonesia is able to allow a loser monetary policy hence providing more room for accelerated economic growth amid a still uncertain global economic context.

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  • Bank Indonesia Revises Down 2016 Economic Growth Projection

    Bank Indonesia Revises Down 2016 Economic Growth Projection

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) revised down its projection for Indonesia's economic growth in 2016 to the range of 5.0 - 5.4 percent (y/y), slightly below its previous forecast in the range of 5.2 - 5.6 percent (y/y). Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo said the central bank decided to trim its projection for gross domestic product (GDP) growth this year due to sluggish global economic growth, low commodity prices, and Indonesia's slightly disappointing Q1-2016 GDP growth figure at 4.92 percent (y/y).

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  • Central Bank & Indonesia's Statistics Agency Expect Deflation in April 2016

    Central Bank & Indonesia's Statistics Agency Expect Deflation in April 2016

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects to see deflation in April 2016 on the back of controlled food prices as the harvest season has arrived. Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo said a central bank survey shows deflation of 0.33 percent month-to-month (m/m) during the first three weeks of April. Besides lower food prices, Martowardojo also attributes April deflation to the government's decision to cut fuel prices (premium gasoline and diesel) by IDR 500 (approx. USD $0.04) per liter per 1 April. This move led to a 4 percent drop in public transportation tariffs.

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  • Bank Indonesia Adopts New Reference Rate: 7-day Reverse Repurchase Rate

    Bank Indonesia Adopts New Reference Rate: 7-day Reverse Repurchase Rate

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) announced on Friday (15/04) it will adopt a new monetary tool per 19 August 2016 that is to replace the existing BI rate which is considered too inefficient to influence market liquidity as it is not directly tied to Indonesia's money markets. The seven-day reverse repurchase rate (reverse repo), which stood at 5.50 percent in the central bank's last auction, is to become the nation's new benchmark. Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo, who communicated through a teleconference from Washington DC, emphasized that the central bank will not change its monetary stance.

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  • Bank Indonesia Expects Deflation in February 2016

    Bank Indonesia Expects Deflation in February 2016

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects to see deflation at 0.15 percent month-to-month (m/m) in February 2016. Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo said lower (government) administered prices in combination with low core inflation will be the recipe for deflation in the second month of the year. The lower administered prices that are primarily the cause of deflation consist of fuel prices, air fares and 12-kilogram liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) canisters. In the first month of the year Indonesian inflation accelerated to 4.14 percent (y/y).

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  • Economic Update Indonesia: November Inflation Expected at 0.2%

    Economic Update Indonesia: November Inflation Expected at 0.2%

    After having experienced two consecutive months of deflation in September and October, Indonesia is expected to see inflation again in November, primarily on higher food prices (chicken meat and rice). Agus Martowardojo, Governor of Bank Indonesia, expects an inflation rate of 0.2 percent (month-on-month) in November. This would mean that inflation in full-year 2015 is likely to reach 3 percent (y/y), in line with earlier estimates and within - or perhaps slightly below - Bank Indonesia's target range of 3 - 5 percent (y/y) of inflation in 2015.

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  • Bank Indonesia Remains Committed to Tight Monetary Stance

    Bank Indonesia Remains Committed to Tight Monetary Stance

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) is expected to keep its benchmark interest rate (BI rate) relatively high in order to safeguard Indonesia's financial stability in 2016 (instead of seeking accelerated economic growth through a rate cut). Despite easing pressures on inflation and the country's current account balance, Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo said that persistent global uncertainty (referring to the looming US Fed Fund Rate hike and China's slowdown) justifies the tight monetary stance.

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