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Today's Headlines Current Account Balance

  • Current Account Deficit Indonesia Widens to 3.37% of GDP in Q3-2018

    Current Account Deficit Indonesia Widens to 3.37% of GDP in Q3-2018

    In line with expectations, Indonesia's current account balance showed a wide deficit in the third quarter of 2018 (and one that has widened compared to preceding quarters). Indonesia's current account deficit was recorded at USD $8.8 billion, equivalent to 3.37 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP), in the third quarter of 2018.

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  • Current Account Deficit Indonesia Expected to Widen to 2.5% of GDP

    Current Account Deficit Indonesia Expected to Widen to 2.5% of GDP

    The current account deficit of Indonesia could widen to 2.5 percent - or more - of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP) in the second quarter of 2018 according to Bank Indonesia's Senior Deputy Governor Mirza Adityaswara. He added that a current account deficit below 3 percent of GDP is still in the safe zone. Dividend payouts are expected to put additional pressure on the Q2-2018 current account deficit of Indonesia.

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  • Bank Indonesia Expects Trade Surplus in March, Economists Predict Deficit

    Bank Indonesia Expects Big Trade Surplus in March, Economists Predict Small Deficit

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects the nation’s trade balance to swing into surplus in March 2018, after recording two monthly trade deficits in January and February (USD $756 million and USD $116 million, respectively), as pressures from imports of raw materials and capital goods are seen sliding. Incumbent Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo said a USD $1.1 billion surplus is possible in the third month of 2018, implying the trade balance would show a surplus, overall, in the first quarter of 2018.

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  • When Will Indonesia's Current Account Record a Surplus Again?

    When Will Indonesia's Current Account Record a Surplus Again?

    Indonesia's current account balance is expected to show a deficit for the next five years. The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) does not rule out a surplus within that period but it would require some serious work in terms of structural reform-making. Indonesia started to record current account deficits in late-2011 due to the ballooning oil import bill (before the government slashed energy subsidies) and weak commodity prices after 2011.

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  • Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 1.8% of GDP in 2017

    Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 1.8% of GDP in 2017

    Bank Indonesia (the central bank of Indonesia) is convinced that the nation's current account deficit (CAD) will not exceed 2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2017. In the second quarter of 2017 the CAD widened to 1.96 percent of GDP (or USD $5 billion), from 0.98 percent of GDP in the preceding quarter (or USD $2.4 billion).

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  • Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 2.4% of GDP in 2017

    Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 2.4% of GDP in 2017

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects Indonesia's current account deficit (CAD) to widen to 2.4 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP), or about USD $23 billion, in 2017. Therefore, Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo said the CAD remains one of the bigger challenges for Indonesia in the foreseeable future. In 2016 the nation's CAD had in fact eased to 1.8 percent of GDP (or USD $17 billion) on the back of a big improvement in the last quarter of 2016.

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  • Bank Indonesia Sees Widening Current Account Deficit in 2017

    Bank Indonesia Sees Widening Current Account Deficit in 2017

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects the nation's current account deficit to widen to 2.4 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2017 due to expectation of rising imports in Indonesia this year. These rising imports come on the back of growing investment realization in Southeast Asia's largest economy. This projection is significantly higher compared to the estimated USD $17 billion, or 1.8 percent of GDP, current account deficit in 2016.

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  • Trade Balance Indonesia: Exports & Imports Rising in October 2016

    Trade Balance Indonesia: Exports & Imports Rising in October 2016

    Indonesia recorded a USD $1.21 billion trade surplus in October 2016 according to the latest data from the nation's Central Statistics Agency (BPS). In line with expectations both exports and imports rose last month supported by rising commodity prices (hence boosting the country's export performance) and an increase in machinery and electrical appliance imports into Indonesia. Meanwhile, BPS revised September's trade surplus to USD $1.27 billion, from USD $1.22 billion reported last month.

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Latest Columns Current Account Balance

  • Current Account Balance of Indonesia: Unlikely to Improve in 3rd Quarter of 2018

    Current Account Balance of Indonesia: Unlikely to Improve in 3rd Quarter of 2018

    Indonesia’s current account balance – which measures the flow of goods, services and investment - remains a source of concern. In the second quarter of 2018 Indonesia’s current account deficit widened to USD $8.02 billion or 3.0 percent of gross domestic product (GDP). It is the biggest quarterly deficit since Q2-2014 and implies that Indonesia is dependent on foreign capital to fund its deficits. This makes investors nervous and therefore foreign funds rapidly exit Indonesia in times of global turmoil.

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  • Indonesia Sees Widening Current Account Deficit in Q2-2018

    Indonesia Sees Widening Current Account Deficit in Q2-2018

    Concerns about Indonesia's current account balance increased after Bank Indonesia announced last week that the country's current account deficit widened to USD $8.02 billion, or 3.0 percent of gross domestic product (GDP), in the second quarter of 2018. It is Indonesia's highest quarterly deficit since Q3-2014, thus putting additional pressures on the rupiah exchange rate.

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  • Economy of Indonesia is Facing Several Big Challenges

    Economy of Indonesia is Facing Several Big Challenges

    There are doubts whether Indonesia's gross domestic product (GDP) growth can reach 5.2 percent year-on-year (y/y) in full-year 2018 as Indonesia is experiencing a couple of major challenges. Challenges include the global trade war, the fragile rupiah, Bank Indonesia's higher benchmark interest rate, the current account deficit, and political tensions ahead of the 2019 legislative and presidential elections. Currently, Indonesia Investments' forecast for Indonesia's economic growth is set at 5.2 percent (y/y) in 2018.

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  • Current Account Deficit of Indonesia at 2.15% of GDP in Q1-2018

    Current Account Deficit of Indonesia at 2.15% of GDP in Q1-2018

    Indonesia's current account balance - the broadest measure of the country's international trade - showed a deficit of USD $5.5 billion, equivalent to 2.15 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP), in the first quarter of 2018. Compared to Q4-2017 (when the deficit was recorded at USD $6.0 billion, or 2.3 percent of GDP), the current account deficit (CAD) declined.

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  • Weak Diversification Behind Indonesia's Trade & Current Account Deficits

    Weak Diversification Behind Indonesia's Trade & Current Account Deficits

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) said it expects to see another monthly trade deficit - approximately USD $230 million - in February 2018. If so, it would be the third straight monthly trade deficit for Southeast Asia's largest economy after a USD $220 million deficit in December 2017 and a USD $678 million deficit in January 2018 (the latter being the country's highest monthly deficit since April 2014).

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  • Financial Update Indonesia: Rupiah, Forex & Current Account

    Financial Update Indonesia: Rupiah, Forex & Current Account

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) said the country's current account deficit remained under control, albeit widening in the last quarter of 2017. Indonesia's current account deficit reached USD $5.8 billion or 2.2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in Q4-2017 (up from a deficit of USD $4.6 billion or 1.7 percent of GDP in the preceding quarter).

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  • Update Indonesia's Q1-2016 Balance of Payments & Current Account

    Update Indonesia's Q1-2016 Balance of Payments & Current Account

    Indonesia's balance of payments registered a deficit in the first quarter of 2016. Based on the latest data from Indonesia's central bank (Bank Indonesia), the deficit stood at USD $287 million in Q1-2016, down from a USD $1.3 billion surplus in the same quarter last year. The balance of payments deficit was the result of the nation's Q1-2016 capital and financial transaction surpluses (USD $4.17 billion) not being able to cover the current account deficit (CAD). Indonesia's Q1-2016 CAD shrank to USD $4.67 billion, or 2.14 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP).

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  • Current Account Indonesia in Check, Worry about Import and Capital & Financial Account

    Current Account Indonesia in Check, Worry about Import and Capital & Financial Account

    Indonesia's current account deficit eased to USD $4.01 billion, or 1.86 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP), in the third quarter of 2015. The central bank (Bank Indonesia) said this improvement is particularly caused by a stronger non-oil & gas trade balance. However, Indonesia's capital and financial account surplus declined to USD $1.2 billion, causing the balance of payments deficit to widen to USD $4.6 billion from USD $2.9 billion in the preceding quarter.

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  • Indonesia’s Current Account Deficit Explained: Why, What, When & How?

    Indonesia’s Current Account Deficit Explained: Why, What, When & How?

    Since late 2011 Indonesia has been plagued by a structural current account deficit (CAD) that has worried both policymakers and (foreign) investors. Despite Indonesian authorities having implemented policy reforms and economic adjustments in recent years, the country’s CAD remains little-changed in 2015. The World Bank and Bank Indonesia both expect the CAD to persist at slightly below 3 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product (GDP) in 2015, alarmingly close to the boundary that separates a sustainable from an unsustainable deficit.

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  • Analysis Indonesian Rupiah; Factors that Influence the Rupiah

    The Indonesian rupiah strengthened on Monday (16/02) as the country’s twin current account and trade balances improved, while the US dollar weakened on disappointing US retail sales and on optimism that Greece will remain a member of the Eurozone. Meanwhile, Indonesia's Finance Ministry held a successful auction today in which it sold IDR 12 trillion (USD $942 million) of conventional bonds. Based on the Bloomberg Dollar Index, Indonesia’s rupiah appreciated 0.35 percent to IDR 12,753 per US dollar based on Monday (16/02).

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