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Today's Headlines State Budget

  • Indonesia in Need to Revise 2016 State Budget

    Indonesia in Need to Revise 2016 State Budget

    The Indonesian government will revise a number of macroeconomic assumptions set in the 2016 State Budget (APBN 2016). This budget was approved on 30 October 2015 and therefore has begun to fall out of tune with the current economic reality. Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro said the indicators that need some rethinking are the Indonesian crude oil price, inflation, and the rupiah exchange rate.

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  • Tax Revenue Indonesia: Shortfall in 2015, Target 2016 Revised

    Tax Revenue Indonesia: Shortfall in 2015, Target 2016 Revised

    The government of Indonesia is in the final phase of revising its tax collection target of 2016 from IDR 1,360.2 trillion (approx. USD $98.5 billion) to IDR 1,226.9 trillion (approx. USD $89 billion). Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro said the new 2016 tax target is based on a 10 percent year-on-year (y/y) growth of last year's tax realization plus an estimated IDR 60 trillion (approx. USD $4.3 billion) generated through the government's planned tax amnesty bill.

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  • Politics of Indonesia: House Approves 2016 State Budget

    Politics of Indonesia: House Approves 2016 State Budget

    Late on Friday evening (30/10), after 11 hours of discussion, Indonesia's House of Representatives (DPR) approved the 2016 State Budget. This is good news for the government as it now has the opportunity to reform fiscal policy and continue with its development programs. The government budget deficit is expected to rise to 2.15 percent of the country's gross domestic product (from 1.9 percent of GDP in the revised 2015 edition), a bit closer to the maximum three-percent-of-GDP rule that is allowed by Indonesian law.

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  • Macroeconomic Assumptions Indonesia to be Discussed in House

    Macroeconomic Assumptions Indonesia to be Discussed in House

    The House of Representatives of Indonesia (DPR) is scheduled to meet on Thursday (22/10) to discuss the government's revised 2016 macroeconomic assumptions. In August 2015, Indonesian President Joko Widodo had unveiled the government's draft 2016 State Budget. However, due to overly optimistic assumptions, there has been the need for several revisions.

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  • Indonesia's Budget Deficit Estimated to Reach 2.2% of GDP in 2015

    Indonesia's Budget Deficit Estimated to Reach 2.2% of GDP in 2015

    Indonesia's budget deficit could rise to 2.2 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP) in 2015 (from a projected 1.9 percent of GDP) as the government's tax revenue may fall short of its target. Based on the revised 2015 State Budget, the government targets to collect IDR 1,489 trillion (approx. USD $110 billion) worth of tax money this year. However, as of August 2015 tax revenue collection stood at 45.8 percent of the 2015 target (or approx. IDR 593 trillion).

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  • 2016 State Budget Draft Indonesia: Capital Injections State Companies

    2016 State Budget Draft Indonesia: Capital Injections State Companies

    Through capital injections the Indonesian government aims to enhance the role of various state-owned enterprises (SOEs) within the process of economic development. In the recently unveiled 2016 State Budget draft, which still requires approval from Indonesia’s House of Representatives, the government allocated a total of IDR 48.2 trillion (approx. USD $3.6 billion) to 24 SOEs in five priority sectors: food security, infrastructure & maritime development, energy security, strategic industry development, and national economic autonomy.

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  • Joko Widodo Presents Indonesia’s 2016 State Budget Draft in Parliament

    Joko Widodo Presents Indonesia’s 2016 State Budget Draft in Parliament

    On Friday (14/08) the Indonesian government unveiled its 2016 State Budget draft at a session in the House of Representatives (DPR). The draft is important as it shows government targets regarding the macroeconomy of Indonesia and it shows on what fields the government will focus in terms of public spending. The government - led by Indonesian President Joko Widodo - is optimistic that economic growth will finally rebound after four years of slowing economic growth as its 2016 GDP growth target was set at 5.5 percent (y/y).

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  • State Budget 2016 Indonesia: Budget Deficit at 1.9-2.0% of GDP

    State Budget 2016 Indonesia: Budget Deficit at 1.9-2.0% of GDP

    The Indonesian government targets to narrow the budget deficit to between 1.9 and 2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2016 from a projected budget deficit of 2.2 percent of GDP in 2015. Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro said on Monday (06/07) that in 2016 the government will continue to prioritize spending on infrastructure development as well as energy and food. President Joko Widodo is scheduled to officially announce the 2016 State Budget in a speech in front of parliament on 16 August 2015.

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  • Oil Sector Indonesia: Production Target 2016 and Rejoining the OPEC

    Oil Sector Indonesia: Production Target 2016 and Rejoining the OPEC

    Indonesia expects to produce between 800,000 and 830,000 barrels of oil per day (bpd) in 2016. This range was agreed during a working meeting between Commission VII (which oversees the country’s energy sector) of the House of Representatives (DPR) and the Energy and Mineral Resources Ministry. The meeting was held in the context of deliberations on the 2016 State Budget. So far this year, Indonesia’s crude oil output stands at an average of 802,046 bpd (monthly basis). Domestic demand, however, stands at 1.43 million bpd.

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  • Joko Widodo Aims to Cut Indonesia’s Expensive Energy Subsidies

    Soon-to-be president of Indonesia Joko Widodo (popularly known as Jokowi) stated that he intends to cut the large fuel and electricity subsidies once in office. Indonesia’s Revised State Budget of 2015 (RAPBN 2015) allocates IDR 363.5 trillion (about USD $31.2 billion) to energy subsidies. This figure accounts for about 18 percent of total government spending (IDR 2,019.9 trillion) set for 2015. Although the energy subsidies aim to support the poorer segments of Indonesian society, they cause complex problems in Southeast Asia’s largest economy.  

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Latest Columns State Budget

  • Despite Deviations Indonesia Won't Revise the 2018 State Budget

    Despite Deviations Indonesia Won't Revise the 2018 State Budget

    The Indonesian government decided not to revise its 2018 State Budget despite the fact that a couple of assumptions in the budget - such as the rupiah exchange rate or the oil price - differ markedly from the actual (real) level in the first half of 2018. After a meeting at the Presidential Palace in Bogor, Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati told reporters that President Joko Widodo will not adjust these assumptions due to a number of considerations.

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  • State Budget Indonesia: Realization & Performance in Q1-2018

    State Budget Indonesia: Realization & Performance in Q1-2018

    The Indonesian government expects the nation's gross domestic product (GDP) to have expanded 5.2 percent year-on-year (y/y) in the first quarter of 2018. Indonesian Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati detects a strengthening domestic economy, supported by improved tax income and improved government spending in Q1-2018.

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  • Looking Back at 2017: Success & Failure of State Budget Targets

    Looking Back at 2017: Success & Failure of State Budget Targets

    Although realization of most components in Indonesia's state budget have improved in 2017, tax revenue realization and the management of energy subsidies remain the two big challenges for the Indonesian government. Southeast Asia's largest economy again failed to meet its tax revenue target last year. Per 31 December 2017 it collected IDR 1,151.5 trillion (approx. USD $85.3 billion) in tax revenue, only 89.74 percent of the target (excluding customs and excise).

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  • Fiscal Update Indonesia: Government Wants to Revise 2016 State Budget

    Fiscal Update Indonesia: Government Wants to Revise 2016 State Budget

    The government of Indonesia proposes to cut the state revenue target by IDR 88 trillion (approx. USD $6.5 billion) in the Revised 2016 State Budget. Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro announced the government has sent the proposal to the House of Representatives’ Budget Committee (Banggar) on Thursday (02/06). Expectations of lower government revenue is the result of weaker-than-estimated tax collection, the lower-than-initially-assumed Indonesian crude oil price as well as the lower-than- estimated oil and gas production in Indonesia.

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  • Government Revenue Collection Indonesia at 23% of 2016 Target in Early May

    Government Revenue Collection Indonesia at 23% of 2016 Target in Early May

    So far this year, realization of government revenue in Indonesia (up to 8 May 2016) has reached IDR 419.2 trillion (approx. USD $32 billion), roughly 23 percent of the full-year revenue target in 2016 (IDR 1,822.5 trillion). This result is weaker compared to last year when the government collected IDR 476.3 trillion in the period 1 January - 15 May 2015, or 27 percent of the full-year target. Meanwhile, government spending reached IDR 586.8 trillion between 1 January and 8 May 2016, or 28 percent of the full-year target (IDR 2,095.7 trillion), roughly the same as government spending during the same period last year.

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  • Indonesia in April: State Budget & 7-day Reverse Repurchase Rate

    Indonesia in April: State Budget & 7-day Reverse Repurchase Rate

    If we look back on the month of April, two important matters - related to the economy - occurred in Indonesia this month: (1) in the first week of April, the Indonesian government managed to complete the Revised 2016 State Budget (RAPBN-P 2016), and, one week later, (2) the central bank (Bank Indonesia) announced it will adopt a new benchmark monetary tool per 19 August 2016 - the so-called seven-day reverse repurchase rate - that is to replace the existing BI rate (which fails to influence market liquidity effectively).

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  • Non-Optimal Public Spending on Infrastructure Development in Indonesia

    Non-Optimal Public Spending on Infrastructure Development in Indonesia

    Public spending on infrastructure development in Indonesia is not optimal. Sofyan Djalil, Indonesia's National Development Planning Minister as well as Head of the National Development Planning Agency (Bappenas), says immature and non-integrated planning between ministries and other government agencies as well as between the central and regional governments cause inefficient and non-optimal infrastructure spending. Non-optimal infrastructure development implies that Indonesia's overall economic growth as well as social development cannot achieve its full potential.

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  • What is the Problem with Tax Collection in Indonesia?

    What is the Problem with Tax Collection in Indonesia?

    A tax amnesty bill, which protects corruptors from prosecution and penalties when bringing overseas funds back to Indonesia and fulfill tax obligations, will soon be discussed among Indonesia's government and the House of Representatives (DPR). A tax pardon is expected to result in enhanced tax collection next year. According to the latest data from Indonesia's Finance Ministry's Tax Directorate General, the country only managed to collect IDR 686 trillion (approx. USD $51 billion), or 53 percent of its 2015 tax revenue target, in the period 1 January - 5 October 2015.

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  • Update on Infrastructure Development in Indonesia under Joko Widodo

    Update on Infrastructure Development in Indonesia under Joko Widodo

    The Finance Ministry of Indonesia announced that it plans to inject USD 1.63 billion into state-owned financing company Sarana Multi Infrastruktur and to transform this company into an infrastructure bank in a move to boost infrastructure development across Southeast Asia’s largest economy. The central government needs private capital to fund its massive infrastructure program for the next five years as it can only account for 30 percent of required investment. For the remainder it relies on private capital and state-owned enterprises.

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