Below is a list with tagged columns and company profiles.

Today's Headlines Electricity Subsidies

  • Rising Crude Oil Prices Cause Surging Energy Subsidy Bill

    Rising Crude Oil Prices Cause Surging Energy Subsidy Bill

    The government of Indonesia needs to keep spending on energy subsidies under control. Looking at the latest data, released by the Finance Ministry on Wednesday (03/01), the government spent IDR 7.4 trillion (approx. USD $573 million) more on energy subsidies (fuel, LPN and electricity) throughout 2017 than it had targeted in the (revised) 2017 state budget.

    Read more ›

  • Consumer Price Index Indonesia: Deflation in March 2017

    Consumer Price Index Indonesia: Deflation in March 2017

    Indonesia's inflation rate eased more than analysts had forecast in March 2017. Based on the latest data from Indonesia's Statistics Agency (BPS), Indonesian inflation fell to an annual rate of 3.61 percent (y/y) on the back of a monthly deflation rate of 0.02 percent in March 2017. The outcome also surprised Indonesia's central bank (Bank Indonesia). Up to the third week of March a Bank Indonesia survey showed inflation reached 0.05 percent.

    Read more ›

  • Indonesia's Electricity Subsidy is Expected to Swell in 2016

    Indonesia's Electricity Subsidy is Expected to Swell in 2016

    Indonesia's electricity subsidies may exceed the IDR 38.39 trillion (approx. USD $2.8 billion) allocated in the 2016 State Budget as there are probably more customers entitled to electricity subsidy than previously estimated. Last month, the Indonesian government and House of Representatives (DPR) agreed on cutting electricity subsidies for 450 VA and 900 VA households, per 1 January 2016, by disconnecting those people that are currently enjoying cheap electricity rates while they are not classified as 'poor' or 'near-poor' and thus do not deserve the subsidized price.

    Read more ›

  • S&P: Indonesia's Electricity Firm PLN Needs better Regulatory Framework

    S&P: Indonesia's Electricity Firm PLN Needs better Regulatory Framework

    Credit rating agency Standards & Poor's (S&P) says Indonesia (and Malaysia) need to increase efforts to build a good track record of timely and reasonable power tariffs adjustments in order to ensure decent returns for investors and recover their costs. Delays in energy price revisions, which are sometimes the result of political strategy, are the key risk that jeopardize the financial stability (and credit profile) of state-owned utility company Perusahaan Listrik Negara (PLN). S&P therefore advises the Indonesian government to enhance efforts to ensure a sound regulatory framework (i.e. a transparent tariff rate-setting mechanism).

    Read more ›

  • Budgetary Commission Proposes to Reduce Indonesia’s Energy Subsidies

    The Budgetary Committee of Indonesia’s parliament announced on Monday (22/09) that it proposes the government to spend 1.6 percent less on energy subsidies in 2015. Originally the government allocated IDR 363.5 trillion (USD $30.4 billion) for energy subsidies (which involves fuel and electricity subsidies) in 2015, up from IDR 350.3 trillion (USD $29.3 billion) in 2014. This would be good news for president-elect Joko "Jokowi" Widodo as he would imply have more fiscal room for his reform programs.

    Read more ›

  • Joko Widodo Aims to Cut Indonesia’s Expensive Energy Subsidies

    Soon-to-be president of Indonesia Joko Widodo (popularly known as Jokowi) stated that he intends to cut the large fuel and electricity subsidies once in office. Indonesia’s Revised State Budget of 2015 (RAPBN 2015) allocates IDR 363.5 trillion (about USD $31.2 billion) to energy subsidies. This figure accounts for about 18 percent of total government spending (IDR 2,019.9 trillion) set for 2015. Although the energy subsidies aim to support the poorer segments of Indonesian society, they cause complex problems in Southeast Asia’s largest economy.  

    Read more ›

  • Higher Electricity Price Will Have Limited Impact on Indonesian Inflation

    Indonesian Finance Minister Chatib Basri expects that the higher electricity tariffs which may be introduced per 1 July 2014 (for 400-950 watt capacity) will have a relatively small impact on the pace of inflation in Southeast Asia’s largest economy. “If introduced, the higher electricity price may add 0.1 or 0.2 percentage point to inflation. The limited impact of this price hike on Indonesian inflation means that the government will not revise its inflation target for 2014 yet,” Basri said. The Indonesian government targets an inflation growth rate of 5.3 to 5.5 percent.

    Read more ›

  • Growing Fuel and Electricity Subsidies Burden Indonesia's State Budget

    One of Indonesia's main fiscal problems is the ever increasing amount of public funds spent on energy subsidies (these include fuels and electricity subsidies). These subsidies aim to support the poorer segments of Indonesian society but several studies conclude that it are in fact the middle class and elite segments that benefit the most of these energy subsidies. Furthermore, by keeping energy prices artificially low, the government distorts the economy by creating a more-or-less 'false economy'.

    Read more ›

  • Foreign Companies Leave West Java on Higher Wages and Electricity Price

    Foreign Companies Leave West Java due to Higher Wages and Electricity Price

    Indonesian newspaper Bisnis Indonesia reported that a number of foreign companies in West Java are ready to leave Indonesia because of increasingly higher operating costs. Chairman of West Java's branch of the Indonesian Employers Association (Apindo) Dedy Widjaja said that the main factors that are driving these investors away are higher regional minimum wages and the government's plan to raise the price of electricity. In May 2014, the Indonesian government intends to cut electricity subsidies for medium and large industry groups.

    Read more ›

Latest Columns Electricity Subsidies

  • Only the (Near) Poor Deserve Electricity Subsidies in Indonesia

    Only the (Near) Poor Deserve Electricity Subsidies in Indonesia

    Indonesia needs to prepare for higher electricity tariffs as the government and House of Representatives (DPR) agreed on cutting electricity subsidies for 450 VA and 900 VA households starting from 1 January 2016. Indonesian authorities only want to provide electricity subsidies to the 24.7 million poorest Indonesian households. However, currently around 45.4 million Indonesians have connections of 450 VA and 900 VA.

    Read more ›

No business profiles with this tag