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Today's Headlines Energy Subsidies

  • Rising Crude Oil Prices Cause Surging Energy Subsidy Bill

    Rising Crude Oil Prices Cause Surging Energy Subsidy Bill

    The government of Indonesia needs to keep spending on energy subsidies under control. Looking at the latest data, released by the Finance Ministry on Wednesday (03/01), the government spent IDR 7.4 trillion (approx. USD $573 million) more on energy subsidies (fuel, LPN and electricity) throughout 2017 than it had targeted in the (revised) 2017 state budget.

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  • No Investment Grade Yet but S&P Positive about Indonesia

    No Investment Grade Yet but S&P Positive about Indonesia

    Global credit rating agency Standard & Poor's (S&P) appreciates the policy reforms that have been conducted by the Indonesian government because these changes lead to more openness as well as to enhanced competitiveness. Apart from cutting costly energy subsidies (and redirecting a large chunk of available funds to infrastructure development) the government also unveiled 12 economic policy packages since September 2015 (while more packages are in the pipeline) that include matters such as tax incentives and deregulation (aimed at boosting investment).

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  • Statistics Indonesia: Electricity Subsidy Cut Raises Inflation & Poverty

    Statistics Indonesia: Electricity Subsidy Cut Raises Inflation & Poverty

    Statistics Indonesia (BPS) said the government's plan to cut electricity subsidies for 450 VA and 900 VA households (per 1 January 2016) is likely to lead to a higher inflation and poverty rate. Cutting the electricity subsidy bill is part of government efforts to reduce costly energy subsidies and redirect these funds to productive investments (for example infrastructure development or social welfare programs). Moreover, more than 20 million Indonesians are enjoying subsidized electricity, while they are not classified as (near) poor.

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  • Government of Indonesia Cuts Prices of Low-Octane Gasoline and Diesel

    Government of Indonesia Cuts Prices of Low-Octane Gasoline and Diesel

    Due to sharply fallen global crude oil prices the Indonesian government announced on Friday (16/01) that prices of fuels (low-octane gasoline and diesel) will be cut by an average of 14 percent, effective from Monday (19/01). The price of gasoline will drop 13 percent to IDR 6,600 (USD $0.53) per liter and diesel by 15 percent to IDR 6,400 (USD $0.51) per liter. Lastly, the government also reduced the price of Pertamina’s liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) by 4.2 percent to IDR 129,000 per 12-kilogram-cannister.

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  • Reforming the Subsidized Fuel Price Policy of Indonesia

    Reforming the Subsidized Fuel Price Policy of Indonesia

    The Indonesian government has further reformed its decade-old fuel subsidy policy in a move to streamline - and make more structural use of - public spending. The latest change is effective from today (1 January 2015) and thus Indonesia moved a step closer to applying a market-based price mechanism. The government now uses a fixed diesel subsidy of IDR 1,000 (USD $0.08) per liter, while subsidy for low-octane gasoline is scrapped altogether (however the government will account for gasoline distribution costs outside Java, Madura and Bali).

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  • Bank Indonesia's Interest Rates Up to Combat Inflation after Fuel Price Hike

    The central bank of Indonesia decided to raise its key interest rate (BI rate) by 25 basis points from 7.50 percent to 7.75 percent on Tuesday (18/11) in a response to the subsidized fuel price hike. One day earlier, Indonesian President Joko Widodo had announced that prices of subsidized gasoline and diesel were to be raised by more than 30 percent starting from midnight in an effort to create more fiscal space for economic and social development. This move is expected to result in accelerated inflation in Southeast Asia’s largest economy.

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  • Jokowi Raises Indonesia’s Subsidized Fuel Prices by IDR 2,000/Liter

    After weeks of uncertainty, Indonesian President Joko Widodo announced on Monday (17/11) that prices of subsidized fuels (gasoline and diesel) are to be raised by IDR 2,000 (USD $0.16) per liter starting from midnight. Gasoline (premium) is to be raised from IDR 6,500 to IDR 8,500 per liter, while diesel will be raised from IDR 5,500 to IDR 7,500 per liter. Earlier it was speculated that an IDR 3,000 per liter price hike would be announced. However, as global oil prices have declined sharply, this was considered an unnecessary burden for the people.

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  • Jokowi & Brodjonegoro on Indonesia’s Subsidized Fuel Price Hike

    After speculation started to rise that Indonesia would perhaps not raise prices of subsidized fuels (gasoline and diesel) in November as recent declining global oil prices have managed to somewhat relieve the government’s budget deficit, Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro said over the weekend that the Indonesian government is still eager to raise these prices within a couple of weeks. However, he added that the price hike will be less than IDR 3,000 (USD $0.25) per liter.

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  • Bank Indonesia’s Governor Supports Higher Subsidized Fuel Prices

    Agus Martowardojo, Governor of Bank Indonesia, is highly supportive of president-elect Joko Widodo’s plan to increase prices of subsidized fuels before the end of the year as this move would help to diminish the country’s structural current account deficit as well as improve the trade balance. Widodo, who will assume office on 20 October 2014, is expected to raise prices of subsidized fuels by between IDR 1,000 and 3,000 per liter, and relocate state funds to social and economic development.

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  • Consumer Confidence in Indonesia Falls Slightly in September

    A survey of Indonesia’s central bank (Bank Indonesia) shows that Indonesian consumer confidence declined slightly to 119.8 points in September 2014 (from 120.2 points in the previous month) on concerns that price increases will limit people’s purchasing power. These concerns are triggered by president-elect Joko Widodo’s plans to raise prices of subsidized fuels before the year-end in an effort to safeguard the country’s financial fundamentals. Widodo (popularly known as Jokowi) will be inaugurated on 20 October 2014.

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Latest Columns Energy Subsidies

  • Indonesian Government Proposes Additional Fuel Subsidy Spending

    Indonesian Government Proposes Additional Fuel Subsidy Spending

    The sharply depreciated Indonesian rupiah exchange rate in the second half of 2013 in combination with the decline in domestic oil lifting has led to a soaring of fuel subsidy spending in 2014. In the 2014 State Budget (APBN 2014), the ceiling of energy subsidy spending for 3-kg LPG and fuels was set at IDR 210.7 billion (USD $18.3 billion). However, in the 2014 Revised State Budget Draft, the government proposes to raise the subsidy ceiling to IDR 285 trillion (USD $24.8 billion), thus swelling IDR 74.3 trillion from the initial ceiling.

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  • Indonesian Cement Sales Decline in April 2014 due to Legislative Election

    Indonesian cement sales fell 0.4 percent (year-on-year) to 4.52 million tons in April 2014. The decline in cement sales was the result of the country’s legislative election that was held on 9 April 2014 as consumers bought few building materials during the campaign period. Head of the Indonesian Cement Association (ASI) Widodo Santoso stated that a number of large infrastructure projects are currently being tendered and are thus unable to boost domestic cement sales yet.

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