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Today's Headlines Current Account Deficit

  • When Will Indonesia's Current Account Record a Surplus Again?

    When Will Indonesia's Current Account Record a Surplus Again?

    Indonesia's current account balance is expected to show a deficit for the next five years. The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) does not rule out a surplus within that period but it would require some serious work in terms of structural reform-making. Indonesia started to record current account deficits in late-2011 due to the ballooning oil import bill (before the government slashed energy subsidies) and weak commodity prices after 2011.

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  • Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 1.8% of GDP in 2017

    Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 1.8% of GDP in 2017

    Bank Indonesia (the central bank of Indonesia) is convinced that the nation's current account deficit (CAD) will not exceed 2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2017. In the second quarter of 2017 the CAD widened to 1.96 percent of GDP (or USD $5 billion), from 0.98 percent of GDP in the preceding quarter (or USD $2.4 billion).

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  • Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 2.4% of GDP in 2017

    Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 2.4% of GDP in 2017

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects Indonesia's current account deficit (CAD) to widen to 2.4 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP), or about USD $23 billion, in 2017. Therefore, Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo said the CAD remains one of the bigger challenges for Indonesia in the foreseeable future. In 2016 the nation's CAD had in fact eased to 1.8 percent of GDP (or USD $17 billion) on the back of a big improvement in the last quarter of 2016.

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  • Bank Indonesia Sees Widening Current Account Deficit in 2017

    Bank Indonesia Sees Widening Current Account Deficit in 2017

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects the nation's current account deficit to widen to 2.4 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2017 due to expectation of rising imports in Indonesia this year. These rising imports come on the back of growing investment realization in Southeast Asia's largest economy. This projection is significantly higher compared to the estimated USD $17 billion, or 1.8 percent of GDP, current account deficit in 2016.

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  • Current Account Balance Indonesia: Deficit Eases to 1.83% of GDP in Q3

    Current Account Balance Indonesia: Deficit Eases to 1.83% of GDP in Q3-2016

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) announced that the nation's current account deficit (CAD) eased to 1.83 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in the third quarter of 2016, improving from a revised 2.2 percent of GDP deficit in the preceding quarter. Bank Indonesia further informed that the CAD will most likely remain in the range of 2.0 - 2.5 percent of GDP in full-year 2016. In 2015 Indonesia's CAD eased to 2.1 percent of GDP. Since late-2011 Southeast Asia's largest economy has had to cope with a wide current account deficit.

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  • Current Account Balance Update Indonesia: Deficit is Improving

    Current Account Balance Update Indonesia: Deficit is Improving

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects Indonesia's current account deficit to have improved to below 2 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) in the third quarter of 2016. This is good news as a wide (and structural) current account deficit is considered a financial weakness because it means the country is building up liabilities to the rest of the world. Ever since late-2011 Indonesia has been suffering a wide current account deficit. This is particularly attributed to the globe's low commodity prices after 2011.

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  • Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 2.2% of GDP in FY-2016

    Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 2.2% of GDP in FY-2016

    Bank Indonesia, the central bank of Indonesia, expects the country's current account deficit to increase to USD $4.8 billion - or about 2.2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) - in full-year 2016. Although the deficit remains high - and is forecast to go higher - there is optimism that this increase is caused by rising imports of capital goods and raw materials. These goods and materials are used to manufacture new products (that may be exported from Indonesia) and therefore have a positive impact on the economy (in contrast to consumer product imports that bring few future economic value).

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  • Indonesia Investments' Newsletter of 15 May 2016 Released

    Indonesia Investments' Newsletter of 15 May 2016 Released

    On 15 May 2016, Indonesia Investments released the latest edition of its newsletter. This free newsletter, which is sent to our subscribers once per week, contains the most important news stories from Indonesia that have been reported on our website over the last seven days. Most of the topics involve economic matters such as Indonesia's Q1-2016 balance of payments, current account deficit and government revenue as well as matters such as Indonesia's credit rating, the Tax Amnesty Bill, Indonesian links to the Panama Papers, and much more.

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  • Bank Indonesia Keeps Key BI Rate at 6.75% in April Policy Meeting

    Bank Indonesia Keeps Key BI Rate at 6.75% in April Policy Meeting

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) kept its key interest rate (BI rate) at 6.75 percent at the April policy meeting. This decision was in line with expectations. During the three policy meetings conducted in the January-March 2016 period Bank Indonesia had already cut its BI rate by a combined 75 basis points as inflation and the current account deficit are under control, while the Indonesian rupiah has been strengthening against the US dollar since the start of 2016. Last week, Bank Indonesia announced it will adopt the seven-day reverse repurchase rate (reverse repo) to replace the existing BI rate as the bank's key monetary tool.

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  • Growing Economic Activity in Indonesia, Higher Current Account Deficit

    Growing Economic Activity in Indonesia, Higher Current Account Deficit

    Indonesia's current account deficit is expected to rise to USD $26 billion, or 2.6 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP), in 2016. This increase is expected because rising investment and infrastructure development in Indonesia will require more imports from abroad. In 2015 Indonesia's current account deficit was recorded at USD $17.8 billion (2.06 percent of GDP), improving from a USD $27.5 billion deficit (3.09 percent of GDP) in the preceding year (when Indonesia touched a record high current account deficit, and which seriously undermined investors' confidence in the nation's assets).

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Latest Columns Current Account Deficit

  • Indonesia's Current Account Deficit Improves in Q1-2017

    Indonesia's Current Account Deficit Improves in Q1-2017

    Data from the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) show Indonesia's current account deficit widened modestly to USD $2.4 billion (or 1.0 percent of Indonesia's gross domestic product, GDP) in the first quarter of 2017. This increase was driven by rising deficits in the oil & gas trade balance and primary income. In the last quarter of 2016 the current account deficit was at (an upward revised) 0.9 percent of GDP. Despite slight widening, Indonesia's current account balance is regarded as being in a healthy state, especially considering the major improvement compared to Q1-2016.

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  • Bank Indonesia: Balance of Payments Surplus at $4.5 billion in Q4-2016

    Bank Indonesia: Balance of Payments Surplus at $4.5 billion in Q4-2016

    Bank Indonesia, the central bank of Indonesia, announced on Friday (10/02) that Indonesia's balance of payments surplus reached USD $4.5 billion in the fourth quarter of 2016 as the capital and financial accounts' surplus managed to (more than) compensate for the USD $1.8 billion current account deficit (or 0.8 percent of the country's gross domestic product/GDP) in the same quarter. Regarding full-year 2016, Indonesia posted a USD $12.1 billion surplus in its balance of payments, while its current account deficit was equivalent to 1.8 percent of GDP.

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  • Consumer Price Index Indonesia: July Inflation Expected at 1%

    Consumer Price Index Indonesia: July Inflation Expected at 1%

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects Indonesia's inflation to reach slightly below 1 percent month-to-month (m/m) in July 2016. According to central bank surveys, Indonesia's inflation accelerated in the first and second week of July by 1.18 percent (m/m) and 1.25 percent (m/m), respectively. Juda Agung, Executive Director of Bank Indonesia's Economic and Monetary Policy Department, said inflation tends to peak ahead of - and during - the Idul Fitri holiday (4-8 July) but is set to ease in the third and fourth week.

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  • Snapshot of the Indonesian Economy: Risks, Challenges & Development

    Snapshot of the Indonesian Economy: Risks, Challenges & Development

    Tomorrow (05/02), Statistics Indonesia is scheduled to release Indonesia's official full-year 2015 economic growth figure. Nearly all analysts expect to see a figure that reflects the continuation of slowing economic growth. Southeast Asia's largest economy expanded 5.0 percent in 2014 and this is expected to have eased further to 4.7 percent or 4.8 percent in 2015 on the back of (interrelated) sluggish global growth, low commodity prices, and weak export performance. Domestically, Indonesia has or had to cope with high interest rates and inflation (hence curtailing people's purchasing power and consumption as well as business expansion).

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  • Bank Indonesia Remains Committed to Tight Monetary Stance

    Bank Indonesia Remains Committed to Tight Monetary Stance

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) is expected to keep its benchmark interest rate (BI rate) relatively high in order to safeguard Indonesia's financial stability in 2016 (instead of seeking accelerated economic growth through a rate cut). Despite easing pressures on inflation and the country's current account balance, Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo said that persistent global uncertainty (referring to the looming US Fed Fund Rate hike and China's slowdown) justifies the tight monetary stance.

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  • Current Account Indonesia in Check, Worry about Import and Capital & Financial Account

    Current Account Indonesia in Check, Worry about Import and Capital & Financial Account

    Indonesia's current account deficit eased to USD $4.01 billion, or 1.86 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP), in the third quarter of 2015. The central bank (Bank Indonesia) said this improvement is particularly caused by a stronger non-oil & gas trade balance. However, Indonesia's capital and financial account surplus declined to USD $1.2 billion, causing the balance of payments deficit to widen to USD $4.6 billion from USD $2.9 billion in the preceding quarter.

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  • Does Bank Indonesia Have Room to Cut its Key Interest Rate?

    Does Bank Indonesia Have Room to Cut its Key Interest Rate?

    As Indonesia's inflation rate has eased to 6.25 percent (y/y) in October 2015 from 6.83 percent (y/y) in the previous month, and given that Indonesian inflation will ease more markedly in the last two months of 2015 as the impact of the subsidized fuel price hike in November 2014 will vanish, the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) seems to have more scope to cut its current relatively high benchmark interest rate, hence giving rise to accelerated economic activity.

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  • Why Moody’s Investors Service Cut its Forecast for Indonesia’s Economic Growth?

    Why Moody’s Investors Service Cut its Forecast for Indonesia’s Economic Growth?

    Global credit rating agency Moody’s Investors Service cut its forecast for economic growth in Indonesia this year from five percent (y/y) to 4.7 percent (y/y) due to the perceived hard landing of China’s economy in combination with sluggish conditions in Japan and the Eurozone. Weak demand from China, the world’s second-largest economy and the top trading partner of Indonesia, is expected to continue to plague Indonesian exports and earnings.

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  • Press Release Bank Indonesia: BI Rate Held at 7.50% in August 2015

    Press Release Bank Indonesia: BI Rate Held at 7.50% in August 2015

    During Bank Indonesia’s Board of Governors it was decided on 18th August 2015 to hold the BI Rate at 7.50 percent, while maintaining the Deposit Facility rate at 5.50 percent and the Lending Facility rate at 8.00 percent. The decision is consonant with efforts to control inflation within the target corridor of 4±1 percent in 2015 and 2016. In the short term, Bank Indonesia (BI) is focused on efforts to stabilize the rupiah amid uncertainty in the global economy, by optimizing monetary operations in the rupiah and the foreign exchange market.

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  • Indonesia’s Current Account Deficit Explained: Why, What, When & How?

    Indonesia’s Current Account Deficit Explained: Why, What, When & How?

    Since late 2011 Indonesia has been plagued by a structural current account deficit (CAD) that has worried both policymakers and (foreign) investors. Despite Indonesian authorities having implemented policy reforms and economic adjustments in recent years, the country’s CAD remains little-changed in 2015. The World Bank and Bank Indonesia both expect the CAD to persist at slightly below 3 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product (GDP) in 2015, alarmingly close to the boundary that separates a sustainable from an unsustainable deficit.

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