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Today's Headlines Tax

  • World Bank Cuts Forecast for Indonesia's 2016 GDP Growth to 5.1%

    World Bank Cuts Forecast for Indonesia's 2016 GDP Growth to 5.1%

    In its March 2016 Indonesia Economic Quarterly, titled "Private Investment is Essential", the World Bank cut its forecast for Indonesia's economic growth in 2016 to 5.1 percent year-on-year (y/y) from an earlier estimate of 5.3 percent (y/y). This downward revision was made due to weaker-than-expected global economic conditions, further weakening commodity prices, and limitations to Indonesian government spending brought about by a looming shortfall in tax revenue.

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  • Delayed Tax Amnesty Bill Talks Impact on Indonesia's Tax Target

    Delayed Tax Amnesty Bill Talks Impact on Indonesia's Tax Target

    After it was decided to postpone talks between the Indonesian government and the House of Representatives (DPR) about the tax amnesty bill (talks have been postponed until April 2016), the government is in need of formulating a new tax revenue target as the late implementation of the tax amnesty program could mean the government will miss out on tens of trillions of rupiah (billions of US dollars) in tax revenue this year. Indonesia's tax amnesty bill, proposed last year, will make it easier for tax evaders to come clean and repatriate their funds into Indonesia.

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  • Tax in Indonesia: Asset Revaluation Generates Additional Tax Revenue

    Tax in Indonesia: Asset Revaluation Generates Additional Tax Revenue

    So far this year, a total of 108 Indonesian companies have taken advantage of the tax incentive offered by the government of Indonesia through its fifth economic stimulus package (released on 22 October 2015). This tax incentive makes it more attractive for companies to revalue their fixed assets. With higher-valued assets as well as larger capital, these companies can borrow more funds from banks, hence having more room to invest. This should then boost overall economic growth of Southeast Asia's largest economy.

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  • Tax Revenue Indonesia: Shortfall in 2015, Target 2016 Revised

    Tax Revenue Indonesia: Shortfall in 2015, Target 2016 Revised

    The government of Indonesia is in the final phase of revising its tax collection target of 2016 from IDR 1,360.2 trillion (approx. USD $98.5 billion) to IDR 1,226.9 trillion (approx. USD $89 billion). Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro said the new 2016 tax target is based on a 10 percent year-on-year (y/y) growth of last year's tax realization plus an estimated IDR 60 trillion (approx. USD $4.3 billion) generated through the government's planned tax amnesty bill.

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  • Challenges Continue for Indonesia's Cigarette Producers

    Challenges Continue for Indonesia's Cigarette Producers

    The year 2015 has been a tough year for Indonesia's tobacco industry due to an 8.7 percent increase in excise on tobacco products in early 2015 and people's weakening purchasing power amid the country's economic slowdown. During the first nine months of 2015 sales of cigarettes in Indonesia fell 1.3 percent (y/y) to 232 billion cigarettes. Next year, challenges will remain as the Indonesian government prepares another tobacco tax hike (23 percent). However, people's purchasing power is estimated to improve as economic growth may accelerate.

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  • Indonesia's Plan to Impose Soda Excise Tax Meets Resistance

    Indonesia's Plan to Impose Soda Excise Tax Meets Resistance

    The plan of Indonesia's government to set an excise tax of between IDR 2,000 and IDR 3,000 (approx. USD $0.18) per liter on carbonated (soda) drinks met fierce resistance from several institutions. Based on Indonesian law, consumption of goods that have a negative impact on consumers' health or the environment need to be controlled and monitored. The Soft Drinks Industry Association (Asrim), Indonesian Food and Beverage Association (Gapmmi),  and Indonesian Employers Association (Apindo) all consider this move to be negative for the country's soft drinks industry.

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  • Budget Deficit Indonesia Can Widen to 2.78% of Gross Domestic Product

    Budget Deficit Indonesia Can Widen to 2.78% of Gross Domestic Product

    As Indonesia's budget deficit may widen to 2.78 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2015, the government is ready to seek USD $5 billion through multilateral loans and private placement. Scenaider Siahaan, Director for Strategy and Debt Portfolio at the Finance Ministry's Directorate General of Debt Management, said it involves standby loans that can be disbursed in the two weeks ahead if needed. The main reason why the budget deficit may be wider than expected is Indonesia's weaker-than-estimated tax revenue.

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  • Income Tax Cut & Street Vendors' Leasehold Certificates in Indonesia's 7th Package

    Income Tax Cut & Street Vendors' Leasehold Certificates in Indonesia's 7th Package

    In the seventh economic stimulus package, the Indonesian government cuts income tax (up to 50 percent) for employees in labor-intensive industries who earn less than IDR 50 million (approx. USD $3,600) per year. This facility, unveiled on Friday (04/12), aims to combat financial pressures on companies caused by the economic slowdown and next year's higher minimum wages (in order to avert a rise in unemployment as companies may feel the need to sack employees). This tax incentive will be offered for a period of two years and - if successful - will be extended.

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  • Budget Deficit of Indonesia Safe on non-Optimal Government Spending

    Budget Deficit of Indonesia Safe on non-Optimal Government Spending

    One advantage of Indonesia's non-optimal government spending is that it somewhat covers for the shortfall of tax revenue that is expected to occur in 2015. The shortfall in tax collection may reach up to IDR 250 trillion (approx. USD $18 billion) and this failure to meet the government's tax collection target in the 2015 State Budget was the reason behind the resignation of Sigit Priadi Pramudito as Director General of Indonesia's Tax Office. But with government spending estimated to reach only about 90 percent of this year's target, the budget deficit should not go beyond the 2.7 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) mark.

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  • Tax Collection to Miss Target in 2015, Indonesia's Tax Chief Resigns

    The Director General of Indonesia's Tax Office, Sigit Priadi Pramudito, unexpectedly resigned from his post on Tuesday (01/12) as it became increasingly clear that there will be a big shortfall, perhaps up to IDR 250 trillion (approx. USD $18 billion), in the country's tax collection this year. In the Revised 2015 State Budget the Indonesian government targets to collect IDR 1,294.3 trillion (approx. USD $94 billion). Pramudito is the first tax chief to resign from his post in the modern history of Indonesia.

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Latest Columns Tax

  • Weak Tax Revenue Indonesia in 1H-2016, Spotlight on Tax Amnesty

    Weak Tax Revenue Indonesia in 1H-2016, Spotlight on Tax Amnesty

    Indonesia's tax revenue realization in the first half of 2016 was disappointing. According to the latest data, Southeast Asia's largest economy collected a total of IDR 518.4 trillion (approx. USD $39.6 billion) worth of tax revenue (including customs and excise) in the first six months of 2016, down 3.3 percent (y/y) from tax revenue realization in the same period one year earlier, and only 33.7 percent of total targeted tax revenue (IDR 1,539.2 trillion) set in the revised 2016 State Budget. The disappointing performance is mainly due to weak tax income from the oil and gas sector.

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  • Tax Amnesty Program Indonesia: Investment Instruments II

    Tax Amnesty Program Indonesia: Investment Instruments II

    The government of Indonesia is preparing various investment instruments in order to absorb the (potentially large) inflow of capital following the launch of the tax amnesty program earlier this month. Besides government bonds, state-owned enterprises' bonds, real estate investment trusts (REITs), and property investment through private equity schemes (RDPTs), the government is also preparing trustees and zero coupon bonds. Without such investment instruments, bubbles are expected to appear due to the large inflow of funds into Indonesia's financial markets.

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  • Tax Amnesty Program Indonesia Launched: Which Investment Instruments?

    Tax Amnesty Program Indonesia Launched: Which Investment Instruments?

    Without giving too much insight into the details and regulations, Indonesian President Joko Widodo launched the tax amnesty program on Friday (01/07) during a speech in front of hundreds of businessmen and officials at Indonesia's tax office headquarters in Jakarta. The tax amnesty program - approved by the House of Representatives in late June - is a strategy to boost state tax income by (temporarily) granting amnesty as well as offering attractive incentives to (former) tax evaders. In return, the tax dodgers have to declare and (if wanted) repatriate their offshore assets into Indonesia.

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  • Indonesia's House Passes Tax Amnesty Bill & Revised State Budget

    In a plenary session on Tuesday (28/06), Indonesia's House of Representatives (DPR) passed the controversial Tax Amnesty Bill into law as well as the revised 2016 state budget. The Indonesian government will be relieved to see the Tax Amnesty Bill come into effect on 1 July 2016 (ending in May 2017) as it expects the bill to boost tax revenue this year by IDR 165 trillion (approx. USD $12.4 billion). Through tax incentives and the pardoning of tax crimes, the tax amnesty program makes it attractive for tax evaders to declare their offshore assets and repatriate these into Indonesia.

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  • Reforming Indonesia's Tax System is Key to Unlock S&P's Investment Grade

    Reforming Indonesia's Tax System is Key to Unlock S&P's Investment Grade

    In the past two weeks, two of the big international credit rating agencies released new reports about Indonesia's fiscal situation. Both agencies affirmed Indonesia's sovereign debt rating: Fitch Ratings kept Indonesia at BBB-/stable (investment grade class) and Standard & Poor's (S&P) maintained Indonesia at BB+/positive (highest junk level, one notch below investment grade). S&P's decision to keep Indonesia within the junk level category was met with disappointment among investors and Indonesian government officials but perhaps not that surprisingly.

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  • Fiscal Update Indonesia: Government Wants to Revise 2016 State Budget

    Fiscal Update Indonesia: Government Wants to Revise 2016 State Budget

    The government of Indonesia proposes to cut the state revenue target by IDR 88 trillion (approx. USD $6.5 billion) in the Revised 2016 State Budget. Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro announced the government has sent the proposal to the House of Representatives’ Budget Committee (Banggar) on Thursday (02/06). Expectations of lower government revenue is the result of weaker-than-estimated tax collection, the lower-than-initially-assumed Indonesian crude oil price as well as the lower-than- estimated oil and gas production in Indonesia.

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  • Government Revenue Collection Indonesia at 23% of 2016 Target in Early May

    Government Revenue Collection Indonesia at 23% of 2016 Target in Early May

    So far this year, realization of government revenue in Indonesia (up to 8 May 2016) has reached IDR 419.2 trillion (approx. USD $32 billion), roughly 23 percent of the full-year revenue target in 2016 (IDR 1,822.5 trillion). This result is weaker compared to last year when the government collected IDR 476.3 trillion in the period 1 January - 15 May 2015, or 27 percent of the full-year target. Meanwhile, government spending reached IDR 586.8 trillion between 1 January and 8 May 2016, or 28 percent of the full-year target (IDR 2,095.7 trillion), roughly the same as government spending during the same period last year.

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  • Tax System Indonesia: Plans to Cut Corporate Income Tax to 20%

    Tax System Indonesia: Plans to Cut Corporate Income Tax to 20%

    More changes to Indonesia's tax system are in the pipeline. Today (11/04), Indonesia's Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro said Southeast Asia's largest economy plans to cut the corporate income tax rate to 20 percent this year (from 25 percent currently). According to Brodjonegoro a 20 percent corporate tax rate is more competitive and will attract investment. Indonesia's finance minister expressed this plan in a meeting with the nation's parliamentary commission overseeing taxes (an income tax rate cut requires parliamentary approval).

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  • Indonesia Does Not Revise 2016 Tax Revenue Target, Realistic or Not?

    Indonesia Does Not Revise 2016 Tax Revenue Target, Realistic or Not?

    Indonesia's Finance Ministry said it will not revise the tax revenue target set in the 2016 State Budget. The Indonesian government targets to collect IDR 1,360.2 trillion (approx. USD $100 billion) worth of tax revenue in 2016, a 28.9 percent rise from tax revenue realization in 2015. However, although it is good to aim high - hence setting an ambitious target - it is also important to be realistic (to avoid budgetary turmoil and gain fiscal credibility, important for Indonesia to be eligible for a credit rating upgrade). How realistic is Indonesia's 2016 tax revenue target?

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  • Infrastructure Development Indonesia: Gaining Momentum in 2016

    Infrastructure Development Indonesia: Gaining Momentum in 2016

    After having grown rapidly in the years 2010-2013, infrastructure development in Indonesia lost its momentum in 2014. This was due to limited available government funds, uncertainty caused by the legislative and presidential elections, and the nation's slowing economic growth. After Joko Widodo became Indonesia's seventh president in October 2014, it was expected that infrastructure development would revive. However, it didn't. But Widodo made one important move by seriously reducing energy subsidies, hence making more funds available for infrastructure development.

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