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Today's Headlines Tax

  • Sixth Economic Policy Package Indonesia: Special Economic Zones

    Sixth Economic Policy Package Indonesia: Special Economic Zones

    The Indonesian government unveiled its sixth economic stimulus package on Thursday (05/11). This latest package involves tax incentives for investment in Indonesia's special economic zones. Special economic zones are defined as designated areas where natural resources (mined in or around the zone) are processed. Chief Economics Minister Darmin Nasution said investors can get income tax discounts of between 20 and 100 percent for a duration up to 25 years. These generous tax holidays are designed to attract investment in the country's manufacturing industry.

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  • Politics of Indonesia: House Approves 2016 State Budget

    Politics of Indonesia: House Approves 2016 State Budget

    Late on Friday evening (30/10), after 11 hours of discussion, Indonesia's House of Representatives (DPR) approved the 2016 State Budget. This is good news for the government as it now has the opportunity to reform fiscal policy and continue with its development programs. The government budget deficit is expected to rise to 2.15 percent of the country's gross domestic product (from 1.9 percent of GDP in the revised 2015 edition), a bit closer to the maximum three-percent-of-GDP rule that is allowed by Indonesian law.

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  • Stimulus Measures Indonesia: Tax Incentive Revaluation Fixed Assets

    Stimulus Measures Indonesia: Tax Incentive Revaluation Fixed Assets

    Effective immediately, the government of Indonesia introduced a new tax incentive that makes it more attractive for companies to revalue their fixed assets. Previously, companies had to pay a ten percent tax on the company's fixed asset growth. As a result, companies tended to refrain from increasing the level of fixed assets resulting in limited tax revenue. The Indonesian Finance Ministry said that companies will only have to pay 3 percent tax on the increased amount, provided that they submit their proposals for fixed asset revaluation before the end of this year.

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  • Indonesia Plans Tax Cuts to Curb Rupiah Volatility and Boost Economic Growth

    Indonesia Plans Tax Cuts to Curb Rupiah Volatility and Boost Economic Growth

    Indonesia plans to cut taxes for local exporters in a bid to boost the country’s foreign exchange reserves, while supporting the rupiah, as part of its second policy package. Indonesia’s rupiah has depreciated 18.1 percent since the start of 2015 due to looming higher US interest rates, low commodity prices, and China’s yuan devaluation. The government now plans to cut income tax on interest that exporters earn when depositing their export proceeds in local banks. Currently, income tax on bank interest (from deposit accounts) stands at 20 percent.

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  • Bank Indonesia Set to Announce Policy Package to Support Rupiah

    Bank Indonesia Set to Announce Policy Package to Support Rupiah

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) is set to announce the second installment of a policy package that aims at raising onshore US dollar supplies (and liquidity). As the rupiah has been the second worst-performing Asian emerging market currency (after Malaysia’s ringgit), having depreciated 18.1 percent against the US dollar so far in 2015, Indonesian policymakers are anxious to prop up the ailing currency in order to safeguard the country’s financial stability. Bank Indonesia's benchmark rupiah rate (Jakarta Interbank Spot Dollar Rate, abbreviated JISDOR) stood at IDR 14,690 per US dollar on Friday (25/09), a 17-year low.

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  • Indonesia Introduces Tighter Regulations Regarding Tax Deductible Interest Payments

    Indonesia Introduces Tighter Regulations Regarding Tax Deductible Interest Payments

    Starting per 1 January 2016, Indonesian companies’ interest payments to lenders are no longer considered tax deductible in case the company’s debt amounts to over four times its equity. Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro said such a tighter regulation regarding corporate debt financing will make it less attractive for local companies to accumulate debt, while strengthening the company's equity structure.

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  • Economic Policy Package: Indonesian Government to Revise Luxury Tax for Houses

    Economic Policy Package: Indonesian Government to Revise Luxury Tax for Houses

    In line with the recently unveiled economic policy package, Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro said that the government plans to revise its luxury tax policy for houses. Currently, houses worth over IDR 2 billion (approx. USD $140,000) are subject to a 20 percent luxury tax. The government now plans to raise this threshold to IDR 10 billion (approx. USD $700,000). Indonesia’s luxury tax was introduced in Suharto’s New Order regime in an effort to curtail inequality within Indonesia’s society.

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  • Difficult to Meet Indonesia’s 2015 Excise and Customs Duties Revenue Target

    Difficult to Meet Indonesia’s 2015 Excise and Customs Duties Revenue Target

    From 1 January 2015 to the first week of September, Indonesia only managed to collect IDR 103.7 trillion (approx. USD $7.2 billion) in excise and customs duties revenue, or 53 percent of the full-year target (IDR 195 trillion) set in the Revised 2015 State Budget. As such, it is highly unlikely that this year’s government target will be met. Heru Pambudi, Director General of the Finance Ministry's Directorate General of Customs and Excise, said it is more likely that 95 percent of the target will be achieved, adding that the bulk of revenue comes from tobacco excise, followed by alcoholic beverages.

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  • Indonesia's Budget Deficit Estimated to Reach 2.2% of GDP in 2015

    Indonesia's Budget Deficit Estimated to Reach 2.2% of GDP in 2015

    Indonesia's budget deficit could rise to 2.2 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP) in 2015 (from a projected 1.9 percent of GDP) as the government's tax revenue may fall short of its target. Based on the revised 2015 State Budget, the government targets to collect IDR 1,489 trillion (approx. USD $110 billion) worth of tax money this year. However, as of August 2015 tax revenue collection stood at 45.8 percent of the 2015 target (or approx. IDR 593 trillion).

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  • Boosting Indonesia’s Economic Growth: Tax Incentives Awarded to 4 Companies

    Boosting Indonesia’s Economic Growth: Tax Incentives Awarded to 4 Firms

    Ogan Komering Ilir Pulp & Paper Mills (OKI), a unit of the Sinar Mas Group, has been granted a tax holiday by the Indonesian government for a period of eight years. Other companies that were awarded tax incentives are Unilever Oleochemical Indonesia, Petrokimia Butadine Indonesia, and Energi Sejahtera Mas. Through these incentives the government of Indonesia aims to make Indonesia more attractive for long-term investment thus boosting the nation’s sluggish economic growth.

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Latest Columns Tax

  • Weak Tax Revenue Indonesia in 1H-2016, Spotlight on Tax Amnesty

    Weak Tax Revenue Indonesia in 1H-2016, Spotlight on Tax Amnesty

    Indonesia's tax revenue realization in the first half of 2016 was disappointing. According to the latest data, Southeast Asia's largest economy collected a total of IDR 518.4 trillion (approx. USD $39.6 billion) worth of tax revenue (including customs and excise) in the first six months of 2016, down 3.3 percent (y/y) from tax revenue realization in the same period one year earlier, and only 33.7 percent of total targeted tax revenue (IDR 1,539.2 trillion) set in the revised 2016 State Budget. The disappointing performance is mainly due to weak tax income from the oil and gas sector.

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  • Tax Amnesty Program Indonesia: Investment Instruments II

    Tax Amnesty Program Indonesia: Investment Instruments II

    The government of Indonesia is preparing various investment instruments in order to absorb the (potentially large) inflow of capital following the launch of the tax amnesty program earlier this month. Besides government bonds, state-owned enterprises' bonds, real estate investment trusts (REITs), and property investment through private equity schemes (RDPTs), the government is also preparing trustees and zero coupon bonds. Without such investment instruments, bubbles are expected to appear due to the large inflow of funds into Indonesia's financial markets.

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  • Tax Amnesty Program Indonesia Launched: Which Investment Instruments?

    Tax Amnesty Program Indonesia Launched: Which Investment Instruments?

    Without giving too much insight into the details and regulations, Indonesian President Joko Widodo launched the tax amnesty program on Friday (01/07) during a speech in front of hundreds of businessmen and officials at Indonesia's tax office headquarters in Jakarta. The tax amnesty program - approved by the House of Representatives in late June - is a strategy to boost state tax income by (temporarily) granting amnesty as well as offering attractive incentives to (former) tax evaders. In return, the tax dodgers have to declare and (if wanted) repatriate their offshore assets into Indonesia.

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  • Indonesia's House Passes Tax Amnesty Bill & Revised State Budget

    In a plenary session on Tuesday (28/06), Indonesia's House of Representatives (DPR) passed the controversial Tax Amnesty Bill into law as well as the revised 2016 state budget. The Indonesian government will be relieved to see the Tax Amnesty Bill come into effect on 1 July 2016 (ending in May 2017) as it expects the bill to boost tax revenue this year by IDR 165 trillion (approx. USD $12.4 billion). Through tax incentives and the pardoning of tax crimes, the tax amnesty program makes it attractive for tax evaders to declare their offshore assets and repatriate these into Indonesia.

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  • Reforming Indonesia's Tax System is Key to Unlock S&P's Investment Grade

    Reforming Indonesia's Tax System is Key to Unlock S&P's Investment Grade

    In the past two weeks, two of the big international credit rating agencies released new reports about Indonesia's fiscal situation. Both agencies affirmed Indonesia's sovereign debt rating: Fitch Ratings kept Indonesia at BBB-/stable (investment grade class) and Standard & Poor's (S&P) maintained Indonesia at BB+/positive (highest junk level, one notch below investment grade). S&P's decision to keep Indonesia within the junk level category was met with disappointment among investors and Indonesian government officials but perhaps not that surprisingly.

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  • Fiscal Update Indonesia: Government Wants to Revise 2016 State Budget

    Fiscal Update Indonesia: Government Wants to Revise 2016 State Budget

    The government of Indonesia proposes to cut the state revenue target by IDR 88 trillion (approx. USD $6.5 billion) in the Revised 2016 State Budget. Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro announced the government has sent the proposal to the House of Representatives’ Budget Committee (Banggar) on Thursday (02/06). Expectations of lower government revenue is the result of weaker-than-estimated tax collection, the lower-than-initially-assumed Indonesian crude oil price as well as the lower-than- estimated oil and gas production in Indonesia.

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  • Government Revenue Collection Indonesia at 23% of 2016 Target in Early May

    Government Revenue Collection Indonesia at 23% of 2016 Target in Early May

    So far this year, realization of government revenue in Indonesia (up to 8 May 2016) has reached IDR 419.2 trillion (approx. USD $32 billion), roughly 23 percent of the full-year revenue target in 2016 (IDR 1,822.5 trillion). This result is weaker compared to last year when the government collected IDR 476.3 trillion in the period 1 January - 15 May 2015, or 27 percent of the full-year target. Meanwhile, government spending reached IDR 586.8 trillion between 1 January and 8 May 2016, or 28 percent of the full-year target (IDR 2,095.7 trillion), roughly the same as government spending during the same period last year.

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  • Tax System Indonesia: Plans to Cut Corporate Income Tax to 20%

    Tax System Indonesia: Plans to Cut Corporate Income Tax to 20%

    More changes to Indonesia's tax system are in the pipeline. Today (11/04), Indonesia's Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro said Southeast Asia's largest economy plans to cut the corporate income tax rate to 20 percent this year (from 25 percent currently). According to Brodjonegoro a 20 percent corporate tax rate is more competitive and will attract investment. Indonesia's finance minister expressed this plan in a meeting with the nation's parliamentary commission overseeing taxes (an income tax rate cut requires parliamentary approval).

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  • Indonesia Does Not Revise 2016 Tax Revenue Target, Realistic or Not?

    Indonesia Does Not Revise 2016 Tax Revenue Target, Realistic or Not?

    Indonesia's Finance Ministry said it will not revise the tax revenue target set in the 2016 State Budget. The Indonesian government targets to collect IDR 1,360.2 trillion (approx. USD $100 billion) worth of tax revenue in 2016, a 28.9 percent rise from tax revenue realization in 2015. However, although it is good to aim high - hence setting an ambitious target - it is also important to be realistic (to avoid budgetary turmoil and gain fiscal credibility, important for Indonesia to be eligible for a credit rating upgrade). How realistic is Indonesia's 2016 tax revenue target?

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  • Infrastructure Development Indonesia: Gaining Momentum in 2016

    Infrastructure Development Indonesia: Gaining Momentum in 2016

    After having grown rapidly in the years 2010-2013, infrastructure development in Indonesia lost its momentum in 2014. This was due to limited available government funds, uncertainty caused by the legislative and presidential elections, and the nation's slowing economic growth. After Joko Widodo became Indonesia's seventh president in October 2014, it was expected that infrastructure development would revive. However, it didn't. But Widodo made one important move by seriously reducing energy subsidies, hence making more funds available for infrastructure development.

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