Below is a list with tagged columns and company profiles.

Today's Headlines Bank Indonesia

  • Indonesia Experiences Deflation of 0.10 Percent in April

    In April 2013, Indonesia's inflation rate eased 0.10 percent month-on-month, or 5.57 percent year-on-year. According to Statistics Indonesia (Badan Pusat Statistik, abbreviated BPS) April's deflation was triggered by easing food and clothes prices. Food items that became cheaper last month included garlic, chili, and chicken meat. Particularly rice contributed to the country's deflation as the harvesting season in Indonesia has set in. Core inflation is 4.12 percent (YoY).

    Read more ›

  • Indonesia's Government Debt Still Low by International Standard

    Indonesian central government debt increased IDR 15.8 trillion (USD $1.6 billion) in the first quarter of 2013 to a total current debt of IDR 1,991.22 trillion (USD $205.3 billion). This total debt consists of loans amounting to IDR 590.2 trillion (USD $60.8 billion) and government securities (Surat Berharga Negara, or SBN) totaling 1,401.1 trillion (USD $144.4 billion). The loans are divided in foreign loans (IDR 588.4 trillion) and domestic loans (IDR 1.8 trillion). The country's debt-to-GDP ratio is currently approximately 24 percent.

    Read more ›

  • Indonesia's March 2013 Inflation Rate Rises Mainly Due to Increased Food Prices

    Today, Statistics Indonesia (Badan Pusat Statistik, abbreviated BPS) released Indonesia's inflation figures for the month March 2013. According to Suryamin, head of BPS, the country's inflation last month reached the level of 0.63 percent, the highest March inflation level in five years. Particularly food prices drove the inflation rate upwards. Year-on-year inflation now stands at 5.90 percent, while year-to-date inflation (January-March) is 2.41 percent.

    Read more ›

  • Indonesia's Central Bank Expects National Economy to Grow by 6.3-6.8 Percent

    Indonesia's central bank (Bank Indonesia) expects the Indonesian economy to grow between 6.3 and 6.8 percent in 2013, supported by strong domestic consumption and foreign investment, with inflation rising by about 4.5 percent. Indonesian exports are expected to increase due to better global demand for Indonesia's commodities such as coal and palm oil, with commodity prices rising accordingly. But some problems in Indonesia's financial system remain to be solved.

    Read more ›

  • Indonesia's Central Bank Continues Historic Low Key Interest Rate

    Central Bank of Indonesia - BI - Bank Indonesia - Indonesia Investments

    Bank Indonesia, the country's central bank, continued its key interest rate at the level of 5.75 percent. The interest rate has been at this historic low level for the 12th month in a row. The current policy rate is "considered consistent with the contained inflationary pressure in accordance with its target range of 4.5 percent ± 1 percent in 2013 and 2014," according to the website of Indonesia's central bank.

    Read more ›

  • Indonesia's International Reserves Fall to Support the IDR Rupiah

    Bank Indonesia's foreign exchange reserves have fallen by US $4 billion to US $108.8 in January from US $112.8 in December 2012. The current reserves translate to six months of imports and short-term government debt payments. Reasons behind the four percent decline are massive spending by Indonesia's Central Bank to support the weakening IDR rupiah in combination with overseas debt payments.

    Read more ›

  • Indonesia's January Inflation Rate Increases by 1.03 Percent

    Badan Pusat Statistik - BPS - Indonesia Investments

    Today, Statistics Indonesia (BPS), a non-departmental government institute, stated that the inflation rate of January increased due to the government's decision to raise electricity tariffs and due to massive floods in Jakarta and other cities. January's headline inflation is 1.03 percent. The year-on-year inflation rate now stands at 4.57 percent; still within Indonesia's Central Bank's target of 4.5 ±1 percent.

    Read more ›

Latest Columns Bank Indonesia

  • Foreign Loan Restrictions and Reporting Obligations in Indonesia

    Foreign Loan Restrictions and Reporting Obligations in Indonesia

    A company that wishes to obtain a foreign loan in foreign currency of more than USD 100,000 is required to fulfill certain requirements set by Bank Indonesia (BI). These requirements are set in BI Regulation 16/21/PBI/2014 concerning The Implementation Of Prudential Principles in Managing External Debt of Non-Bank Corporation and amendment 18/4/PBI/2016 (BI Regulation). Further explanation is provided in the BI Circular number 16/24/DKEM of 2014 and its amendment number 17/18/DKEM of 2015. In this column we will discuss the reporting requirements for foreign loans of more than USD 100,000.

    Read more ›

  • Bank Indonesia Kept Interest Rates Unchanged on Capital Outflow Risk

    Bank Indonesia Kept Interest Rates Unchanged on Capital Outflow Risk

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) decided to leave its interest rate environment unchanged at the January 2017 policy meeting on Thursday (19/01). The benchmark seven-day reverse repurchase rate (BI 7-day RR Rate) was kept at 4.75 percent, while the Deposit Facility and Lending Facility rates were maintained at 4.00 percent and 5.50 percent, respectively. The decisions of Bank Indonesia are in line with analysts' forecasts. Due to risks of capital outflows Indonesia's central bank had few room to ease monetary policy.

    Read more ›

  • Impact of Fed's Interest Rate Hike on the Value of Indonesia's Rupiah

    Impact of Fed's Interest Rate Hike on the Value of Indonesia's Rupiah

    Stock markets in Asia are mixed, yet tepid on Friday (16/12) after the US Federal Reserve raised its interest rate regime for the second time in a decade on Wednesday (14/12). Although the Fed's move was widely anticipated (and therefore already "priced in" to a high degree) it still resulted in some capital outflows from Asia's stock markets on Thursday (13/12). Japan, as usual, is the notable exception as US dollar strength (or yen weakness) makes Japan's export-oriented stocks more attractive.

    Read more ›

  • Bank Indonesia Keeps Interest Rate Unchanged at December Meeting

    Bank Indonesia Keeps Interest Rate Unchanged at December Meeting

    Bank Indonesia, the central bank of Indonesia, kept its benchmark interest rate unchanged at the December 2016 policy meeting, nearly a day after the US Federal Reserve decided to raise its key Fed Funds Rate by 25 basis points to the range 0.50 - 0.75 percent. Moves of both central banks were expected. Monetary tightening in the USA triggers capital outflows from emerging markets (the Indonesian rupiah depreciated around 0.70 percent against the US dollar on Thursday). Therefore, Bank Indonesia had little room to seek monetary easing.

    Read more ›

  • Bank of Indonesia: Assessing Impact of Sudden Rate Cut

    Bank of Indonesia: Assessing Impact of Sudden Rate Cut

    The Bank of Indonesia recently resorted to a sudden cut in interest rate (by 25 bps to 4.75 percent) at its 20th October 2016 meeting. This followed a 25 bps reduction in September and thus this is the sixth time this year that the Indonesian central bank has elected to loosen monetary policy.

    Read more ›

  • Bank Indonesia Kept 7-Day Reverse Repo Rate at 4.75% in November

    Bank Indonesia Keeps 7-Day Reverse Repo Rate at 4.75% in November

    In line with expectations Indonesia's central bank (Bank Indonesia) kept its benchmark reference rate - the BI 7-Day (Reverse) Repo Rate - at 4.75 percent at Thursday's policy meeting (17/11). This decision was made amid the high degree of uncertainty in global financial markets (triggered by the 2016 US presidential election) and stable domestic conditions (low inflation and an improving current account deficit). The high degree of volatility does cause major pressures on the rupiah and therefore Bank Indonesia will continue to stabilize exchange rates through intervention in markets.

    Read more ›

  • Bank Indonesia Ending the Era of High Interest Rates?

    Bank Indonesia Ending the Era of High Interest Rates?

    Bank Indonesia (BI) is the central bank of the Republic of Indonesia, and was known as "De Javasche bank" or "The Java Bank" in the colonial period.  Bank Indonesia was founded on 1 July 1953 from the nationalization of De Javasche Bank. As an independent state institution, Bank Indonesia is fully autonomous in formulating and implementing each of its assumed tasks and most policy goals tend to center around the ability to stabilize prices in the economy.

    Read more ›

  • Bank Indonesia Cut Interest Rates Again in October 2016

    Bank Indonesia Cut Interest Rates Again in October 2016

    Bank Indonesia surprised markets. On Thursday (20/10) the central bank of Southeast Asia's largest economy cut its benchmark interest rate - the BI 7-day reverse repo rate - by 25 basis points to 4.75 percent. Meanwhile, both the deposit facility and lending facility were also cut by 25 basis points to 4.00 percent and 5.50 percent, respectively. Perhaps it was Bank Indonesia's present to Indonesian President Joko Widodo for the two-year anniversary of his government. A lower interest rate climate should encourage macroeconomic expansion.

    Read more ›

  • Analysis Indonesian Economy: GDP, Monetary Policy & Stability

    Analysis Indonesian Economy: GDP, Monetary Policy & Stability

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) has become slightly less optimistic about Indonesia's economic growth in the third quarter of 2016. Bank Indonesia revised down its growth projection to below the 5 percent (y/y) mark for Q3-2016 (from an earlier forecast of 5.2 percent). However, the lender of last resort still expects to see a better performance compared to the 4.73 percent (y/y) pace posted in Q3-2015. Meanwhile, low inflation and a strong rupiah could result in another interest rate cut in Southeast Asia's largest economy.

    Read more ›

  • What Is Next For Indonesian Interest Rates?

    What Is Next For Indonesian Interest Rates?

    On September 22, 2016, the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) decided to cut its BI seven-day repo rate from 5.25 percent to 5.00 percent, and this has changed parts of the long-term outlook for investors. Bank Indonesia also reduced its lending rate to 5.75 percent (from previous 5.50 percent), and the deposit rate to 4.50 percent (from previous 4.75 percent previously). This is significant because it shows that lending rates and interest rates have dropped to multi-year lows with the current policy changes.

    Read more ›

Associated businesses Bank Indonesia