Below is a list with tagged columns and company profiles.

Today's Headlines Bank Indonesia

  • Indonesia Experiences Deflation of 0.10 Percent in April

    In April 2013, Indonesia's inflation rate eased 0.10 percent month-on-month, or 5.57 percent year-on-year. According to Statistics Indonesia (Badan Pusat Statistik, abbreviated BPS) April's deflation was triggered by easing food and clothes prices. Food items that became cheaper last month included garlic, chili, and chicken meat. Particularly rice contributed to the country's deflation as the harvesting season in Indonesia has set in. Core inflation is 4.12 percent (YoY).

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  • Indonesia's Government Debt Still Low by International Standard

    Indonesian central government debt increased IDR 15.8 trillion (USD $1.6 billion) in the first quarter of 2013 to a total current debt of IDR 1,991.22 trillion (USD $205.3 billion). This total debt consists of loans amounting to IDR 590.2 trillion (USD $60.8 billion) and government securities (Surat Berharga Negara, or SBN) totaling 1,401.1 trillion (USD $144.4 billion). The loans are divided in foreign loans (IDR 588.4 trillion) and domestic loans (IDR 1.8 trillion). The country's debt-to-GDP ratio is currently approximately 24 percent.

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  • Indonesia's March 2013 Inflation Rate Rises Mainly Due to Increased Food Prices

    Today, Statistics Indonesia (Badan Pusat Statistik, abbreviated BPS) released Indonesia's inflation figures for the month March 2013. According to Suryamin, head of BPS, the country's inflation last month reached the level of 0.63 percent, the highest March inflation level in five years. Particularly food prices drove the inflation rate upwards. Year-on-year inflation now stands at 5.90 percent, while year-to-date inflation (January-March) is 2.41 percent.

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  • Indonesia's Central Bank Expects National Economy to Grow by 6.3-6.8 Percent

    Indonesia's central bank (Bank Indonesia) expects the Indonesian economy to grow between 6.3 and 6.8 percent in 2013, supported by strong domestic consumption and foreign investment, with inflation rising by about 4.5 percent. Indonesian exports are expected to increase due to better global demand for Indonesia's commodities such as coal and palm oil, with commodity prices rising accordingly. But some problems in Indonesia's financial system remain to be solved.

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  • Indonesia's Central Bank Continues Historic Low Key Interest Rate

    Central Bank of Indonesia - BI - Bank Indonesia - Indonesia Investments

    Bank Indonesia, the country's central bank, continued its key interest rate at the level of 5.75 percent. The interest rate has been at this historic low level for the 12th month in a row. The current policy rate is "considered consistent with the contained inflationary pressure in accordance with its target range of 4.5 percent ± 1 percent in 2013 and 2014," according to the website of Indonesia's central bank.

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  • Indonesia's International Reserves Fall to Support the IDR Rupiah

    Bank Indonesia's foreign exchange reserves have fallen by US $4 billion to US $108.8 in January from US $112.8 in December 2012. The current reserves translate to six months of imports and short-term government debt payments. Reasons behind the four percent decline are massive spending by Indonesia's Central Bank to support the weakening IDR rupiah in combination with overseas debt payments.

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  • Indonesia's January Inflation Rate Increases by 1.03 Percent

    Badan Pusat Statistik - BPS - Indonesia Investments

    Today, Statistics Indonesia (BPS), a non-departmental government institute, stated that the inflation rate of January increased due to the government's decision to raise electricity tariffs and due to massive floods in Jakarta and other cities. January's headline inflation is 1.03 percent. The year-on-year inflation rate now stands at 4.57 percent; still within Indonesia's Central Bank's target of 4.5 ±1 percent.

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Latest Columns Bank Indonesia

  • Analysis Indonesian Economy: GDP, Monetary Policy & Stability

    Analysis Indonesian Economy: GDP, Monetary Policy & Stability

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) has become slightly less optimistic about Indonesia's economic growth in the third quarter of 2016. Bank Indonesia revised down its growth projection to below the 5 percent (y/y) mark for Q3-2016 (from an earlier forecast of 5.2 percent). However, the lender of last resort still expects to see a better performance compared to the 4.73 percent (y/y) pace posted in Q3-2015. Meanwhile, low inflation and a strong rupiah could result in another interest rate cut in Southeast Asia's largest economy.

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  • What Is Next For Indonesian Interest Rates?

    What Is Next For Indonesian Interest Rates?

    On September 22, 2016, the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) decided to cut its BI seven-day repo rate from 5.25 percent to 5.00 percent, and this has changed parts of the long-term outlook for investors. Bank Indonesia also reduced its lending rate to 5.75 percent (from previous 5.50 percent), and the deposit rate to 4.50 percent (from previous 4.75 percent previously). This is significant because it shows that lending rates and interest rates have dropped to multi-year lows with the current policy changes.

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  • Bank Indonesia Cuts Key Interest Rates Again in September

    Bank Indonesia Cuts Key Interest Rates Again in September

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) cut its benchmark BI 7-day Reverse Repo rate (RR rate) by 25 basis points to 5 percent at the policy meeting that was concluded on Thursday (22/09). The lender of last resort also cut the Deposit and Lending Facility rates¹ by 25 basis points to 4.25 percent and 5.75 percent, respectively. Given the stable domestic economy, Bank Indonesia is able to allow a loser monetary policy hence providing more room for accelerated economic growth amid a still uncertain global economic context.

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  • Currency Markets: Bank of Indonesia Guiding USD/IDR

    Currency Markets: Bank of Indonesia Guiding USD/IDR

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) has made some important decisions under the current Governor Agus Martowardojo. Here, Bank Indonesia has been directed toward achieving the responsibility of making financial decisions that promote consumer price stability over the long-term. This has resulted in widespread gains in the rupiah against a basket of world currencies -- including the US dollar. But recent rate cuts now have the potential to reverse these broader trends.

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  • Projection for Credit Growth in Indonesia Cut Again

    Projection for Credit Growth in Indonesia Cut Again

    Bank Indonesia cut its projection for credit growth in the nation's banking sector this year from the range of 10 - 11 percent year-on-year (y/y) to 7 - 9 percent (y/y). This downward revision is in line with the central bank's earlier decision to cut its forecast for economic growth from the range of 5.0 - 5.4 percent (y/y) to 4.9 - 5.3 percent (y/y) in 2016. The slightly less rosy outlook is caused by the Indonesian government's decision to cut spending for the remainder of the year, while global economic growth remains subdued.

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  • Bank Indonesia Adopts 7-Day Reverse Repo, Kept at 5.25%

    Bank Indonesia Adopts 7-Day Reverse Repo, Kept at 5.25%

    The central bank of Indonesia kept the BI seven-day reverse repo rate (7-day RR Rate) at 5.25 percent after its two-day August policy meeting (18-19 august 2016). At this policy meeting Bank Indonesia adopted the 7-day RR Rate as the nation's new benchmark monetary tool, replacing the BI rate that failed to influence markets significantly: despite the BI Rate having been cut from 7.50 percent to 6.50 percent so far this year, Indonesia's lending rates did not drop accordingly.

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  • Bank Indonesia to Adopt 7-Day Reverse Repo Rate at August Policy Meeting

    Bank Indonesia to Adopt 7-Day Reverse Repo Rate at August Policy Meeting

    This week the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) is set to adopt the seven-day reverse repurchase rate (reverse repo) as the nation's new benchmark monetary tool at the August policy meeting (18/19 August), thus replacing the existing BI rate that is considered too weak to have an immediate and significant impact on Indonesia's borrowing costs and market liquidity. Bank Indonesia Governor Agus Martowardojo informed that the central bank has been holding road shows to financial centers across the nation (and abroad) to provide detailed information about the new benchmark.

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  • Indonesia's Monetary & Fiscal Policies Require More Harmony

    Indonesia's Monetary & Fiscal Policies Require More Harmony

    At its latest monthly policy meeting the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) left its interest rate regime unchanged with the benchmark BI rate at 6.50 percent (this month the bank is set to adopt the seven-day reverse repurchase rate - reverse repo - as the new benchmark rate). Bank Indonesia's decision to leave interest rates unchanged was a surprise move given that the nation's inflation is low, the rupiah is strengthening, but overall economic growth has remained sluggish. This context would actually justify a moderate interest rate cut of 25 basis points.

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  • Consumer Price Index Indonesia: July Inflation Expected at 1%

    Consumer Price Index Indonesia: July Inflation Expected at 1%

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects Indonesia's inflation to reach slightly below 1 percent month-to-month (m/m) in July 2016. According to central bank surveys, Indonesia's inflation accelerated in the first and second week of July by 1.18 percent (m/m) and 1.25 percent (m/m), respectively. Juda Agung, Executive Director of Bank Indonesia's Economic and Monetary Policy Department, said inflation tends to peak ahead of - and during - the Idul Fitri holiday (4-8 July) but is set to ease in the third and fourth week.

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  • Bank Indonesia Leaves Interest Rates Unchanged at July Policy Meeting

    Bank Indonesia Leaves Interest Rates Unchanged at July Policy Meeting

    Contrary to expectations, the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) left its monetary policy unchanged at the July policy meeting. The benchmark interest rate (BI rate) was kept at 6.50 percent, while the deposit facility rate and lending facility rate were kept at 4.50 percent and 7.00 percent, respectively. The 7-day reverse repurchase rate, which is set to become the central bank's new benchmark on 19 August 2016 - replacing the BI rate - was left at 5.25 percent.

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