Below is a list with tagged columns and company profiles.

Today's Headlines Employment

  • Indonesia's Unemployment Rate Rises Slightly in August 2013

    Indonesia's unemployment rate rose slightly in August 2013 from the same month last year. The country's open unemployment rate rose from 6.14 percent to 6.25 percent (of the total labour force). In absolute numbers this translates to 7.4 million jobless Indonesians. Head of Statistics Indonesia, Suryamin, said that Indonesia's slowing economic growth was the main reason for the rise in unemployment, while the supply of human resources increased. In the third quarter of 2013, Indonesia's GDP growth fell to 5.62 percent (yoy).

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  • Indonesia Continues to Top Global Consumer Confidence Ranking

    Indonesia continues to top the ranking of countries with the highest consumer confidence in the third quarter of 2013 although its score fell four points from the second quarter to 120. According to the Nielsen Global Survey of Consumer Confidence and Spending Intentions, consumers in Indonesia are optimistic due to the general elections in mid-2014 and growth of the country's middle class. However, as inflation surged after prices of subsidized fuels were raised in June, the score fell slightly.

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  • New Minimum Wage Jakarta Set at IDR 2.4 Million ($213) per Month in 2014

    After two days of demonstrations by tens of thousands of Indonesian workers, the Governor of Jakarta (Joko Widodo) raised the capital's minimum wage to IDR 2.4 million (USD $213) per month. The new minimum wage, proposed by the Jakarta Wage Council, will be implemented in 2014 and constitutes a 10% increase from the current minimum wage of IDR 2.2 million. The workers, however, had demanded for a minimum wage of IDR 3.7 million causing various institutions and analysts to express concerns about the impact on the investment climate.

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  • Demand for Higher Minimum Wages Hurts Indonesia's Investment Climate

    On Monday (28/10), another large-scale demonstration took place in the center of Jakarta, Indonesia's capital city. The workers that participated in the strike demanded a new minimum wage for Jakarta's provincial government due to the country's recent high inflation rate after prices of subsidized fuels were raised in June 2013, thus curbing people's purchasing power. The workers demand for the new minimum wage of IDR 3.7 million (USD $327) per month. However, these developments can hurt the investment climate in Indonesia.

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  • Indonesia's Crude Palm Oil Export Duty Lowered to 9% in September 2013

    The government of Indonesia will lower the export duties on crude palm oil (CPO) from 10.5 percent in August to 9 percent in September if the CPO price continues to stay between USD $800-850 per ton. This lower tax policy is done in order to stimulate export revenues amid persistent weak global commodity prices. The international palm oil market is expected to remain stagnant in August and September. Stockpiles of CPO in Malaysia and Indonesia are projected to rise between September and December 2013.

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  • Indonesia's Idul Fitri Traffic Causes many Accidents, Casualties and Injuries

    Indonesia's Idul Fitri Traffic Causes many Accidents, Casualties and Injuries

    According to Indonesia's police department, heavy traffic caused by the Idul Fitri celebrations resulted in the deaths of more than 471 people as well as 740 seriously injured people in over 2000 traffic accidents. Most accidents are caused by drivers that fall asleep during the journey. Idul Fitri marks the end of the holy fasting month (Ramadan) and is one of the major national holidays in Indonesia. This year Idul Fitri fell on Thursday 8 August and, as usual, is accompanied by the tradition that Indonesians travel back to their places of birth.

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  • Economic Growth Brings High Consumer Confidence in Indonesia

    According to research conducted by Nielsen Indonesia, Indonesia's middle class is the world's most optimistic middle class segment in the second quarter of 2013. Indonesia leads the Nielsen Global Survey of Consumer Confidence and Spending Intentions index with 124 points, followed by the Philippines (121 points) and India (118 points). The average global consumer index stands at 94 points. It is interesting to note that Asian countries top the index. The emerging Asia Pacific region is far above the 94-points average with 105 points.

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  • Indonesian Goverment Wants to Limit Regional Minimum Wage Increase

    Indonesia's government will make a new government regulation that foresees the minimum wage increase in all 33 provinces will be kept below 20 percent in 2014. This new rule is directed to labor-intensive industries, including Indonesia's small and medium businesses. The limitation of the regional minimum wage increase to 20 percent is much lower than the demand from Indonesia's labor associations, which requested minimum wage increases up to 50 percent.

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  • JP Morgan: Why Should You Continue to Purchase Stocks?

    In recent months, positive fundamentals have coloured stock indices green. Despite volatility, these positive fundamentals remain today. Therefore, analysts of JP Morgan emphasize that people should not turn their backs to stock markets now. Risks are obviously always present but the analysts stress that people should not be too concerned about ongoing volatility. In fact, volatility should be used to one's advantage by purchasing when the index is low. Below are five arguments that JP Morgan mentions as reason to keep buying stocks.

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  • Unemployment in Indonesia Declines Steadily According to Latest BPS Data

    According to data from Statistics Indonesia (BPS) that was published yesterday, Indonesia's unemployment rate has fallen to 5.92 percent in February 2013 from 6.14 percent in August 2012. BPS, a government agency, always takes the months February and August as bases to release its (un)employment figures. From August 2012 to February 2013 about 3.1 million Indonesians were added to Indonesia's labor force. This means that the country's current labor force numbers 121.2 million people (out a total population of 240 million).

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Latest Columns Employment

  • Surveying Prospects for Labor-Market Improvement in Indonesia

    Surveying Prospects for Labor-Market Improvement in Indonesia

    Constructing a comprehensive outlook of a country’s political and macroeconomic climate requires a firm grasp on the nature of general labor, employment, and the trajectory of the labor-market. Such an endeavor is especially important in considering Indonesia, which again finds itself at a juncture in labor-market development. Questions over a ‘demographic dividend’ are emanating amid new budgetary propositions, waning consumer confidence, and the post-election tempering of popularized radical politics.

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  • JobTech Provides 1st Whole Country Online Jobs Scan of Indonesia

    JobTech Provides First Whole Country Online Jobs Scan of Indonesia

    JobTech has initiated coverage on Indonesia's rapidly expanding technology sector. In tandem with the launch of Indonesia’s 2020 Go Digital Vision to become the biggest digital economy in Southeast Asia, technology jobs in Indonesia account for 42 percent of total unique online jobs from January-June 2017. Of these, more than 60 percent of the job postings are localized in Jakarta. Based on the trending in the first half of 2017, technology jobs in Indonesia are expected to continue to grow strongly for the rest of the year.

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  • How Many Foreigners Actually Work in Indonesia? No Hoax!

    How Many Foreigners Actually Work in Indonesia? No Hoax!

    Over the past couple of weeks public outcry ensued in Indonesia due to rumors (a hoax) that said there are currently about ten million workers from China in Indonesia, implying these immigrants are (potentially) "stealing" jobs from the local population. Xenophobia and nationalist sentiments are no strangers to Indonesia, a country that faced a long colonial period, and therefore this hoax easily ignited anxiety among (part of) the Indonesian people. But how many foreigners are currently actually working in Indonesia?

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  • Link between Indonesia's National Education Day & International Labor Day

    Relation between Indonesia's National Education Day & International Labor Day

    The month May is a memorable month for Indonesia in terms of historic significance. On 21 May 1998 former president Suharto - who ruled the country for more than three decades through his authoritarian New Order regime - resigned after having become politically isolated after Jakarta had turned into a bloody battlefield. This was one of the largest events in the political history of Indonesia, causing structural changes in the political system. Other key days in May are International Labor Day (1 May), National Education Day (2 May), and National Awakening Day (20 May).

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  • Wages of Indonesian Employees Reregulated (2/3)

    Wages of Indonesian Employees Reregulated (2/3)

    In our previous column we have already discussed regulations regarding the wage structure, non-wage and calculation of wages of employees in Indonesia based on the Ministry of Manpower issued regulation number 78 of 2015 concerning Wages (New Regulation). The column of this week is a continuation of the previous column and discusses the other wage regulations set by the New Regulation, which includes regulations regarding payment of wages during absence of the employee.

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  • Income Inequality in Indonesia Threatens Social, Economic & Political Stability

    Income Inequality in Indonesia Threatens Social, Economic & Political Stability

    The World Bank says income inequality in Indonesia is widening and as a consequence the fruits of Indonesia's economic growth over the past decade have only been enjoyed by the richest 20 percent of Indonesian society, leaving behind the remaining 80 percent of the population (or 200 million people). In its new report titled "Indonesia's Rising Divide" the World Bank states that rising inequality in society can jeopardize social cohesion, as well as political and economic stability over the long term. The report claims that inequality in Indonesia has reached a relatively high level and is climbing faster than in most of its regional peers.

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  • Indonesia Amends 10 Local-Staff-per-Foreign-Worker (Expat) Rule

    Indonesia Amends Local-Staff-per-Foreign-Worker (Expat) Regulation

    When the Indonesian government unveiled Ministry of Manpower Regulation No. 16/2015 in July, foreign companies in Indonesia became nervous. The regulation required that for every foreign worker (expat) in Indonesia, 10 locals would need to be hired. Although the regulation would not work retroactively, while new foreign companies in Indonesia would be allowed to hire low-paid non-permanent staff (such as office boys or drivers), the regulation met resistance from international chambers of commerce.

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  • Bipartite Dispute Resolution for Labor Disputes in Indonesia

    Bipartite Dispute Resolution for Labor Disputes in Indonesia

    In our previous column we have already explained that dispute resolution for labor disputes in Indonesia generally follows three general steps, i.e. bipartite dispute resolution, tripartite dispute resolution and dispute resolution of labor disputes through the industrial relations court (Labor Court). In the column of this week we take a closer look at the rules and procedures governing the bipartite dispute resolution. The employer and employee in Indonesia are required to perform this bipartite negotiations, before the dispute is being resolved through e.g. mediation or court.

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  • Limited Stay Permit (KITAS) for Expatriates in Indonesia

    Limited Stay Permit (KITAS) for Expatriates in Indonesia

    Expatriates which are working in Indonesia require a limited stay permit (KITAS). In order to obtain a limited stay permit several licenses must be arranged. In previous columns we have explained the procedure for obtaining these licenses, which include a foreign manpower utilization plan (RPTKA), a foreign manpower work permit (IMTA) and telex visa. Before being able to obtain a limited stay permit (KITAS), expatriates and their employer must have arranged aforementioned licenses. In this column we will elaborate further about the limited stay permit (KITAS) for expatriates.

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  • Director Cannot be Considered as Employee in Indonesia

    Director Cannot be Considered as Employee in Indonesia

    Directors in Indonesia cannot be considered employees in Indonesia, because Indonesian Law number 13 of 2013 regarding Manpower (Labor Law) defines them as entrepreneurs. This has several implications of directors in Indonesia. The biggest implication is that directors do not enjoy the strong employee protection based on the Labor Law. Directors are therefore advised to carefully draft their service agreements to ensure sufficient protection. In this column we will explain the exact status of a director in Indonesia.

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