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Today's Headlines State Budget

  • Tax in Indonesia: Indonesian Tax-to-GDP Ratio and Tax Compliance Still Low

    The structure of tax revenue in Indonesia has not changed in the past decade resulting in the country’s still low tax-to-GDP ratio of between 12 and 13 percent. Emerging countries such as Indonesia typically have a low tax-to-GDP ratio as the government’s financial management is inadequate (and plagued by corruption). However, it is important for Indonesia to raise this ratio in order to have more funds available to finance the budget deficit, infrastructure development, healthcare, education and other social programs to combat poverty.

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  • Indonesian Government Auctions Rupiah-Denominated Bonds on Tuesday

    Today (21/01), the government of Indonesia auctions rupiah-denominated state bonds of IDR 10 billion (USD $833 million) in order to reap funds to finance targets set in the government's 2014 state budget (APBN 2014). The bonds, involving the new issuance of SPN12150108 and re-openings of series FR0069, FR0070, and FR0071, have a nominal value of IDR 1 million each. Series SPN12150108 is issued at a discount yield. The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) organizes the auction using a multiple price method.

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  • Indonesia's Weak Rupiah Exchange Rate Weighs on Fuel Subsidy Spending

    Indonesia's Weak Rupiah Exchange Rate Weighs on Fuel Subsidy Spending

    The depreciating Indonesia rupiah exchange rate has large consequences for Indonesia's state budget, in particular fuel subsidy spending, as the government imports a large quantity of its crude oil demand (in US dollars). The weak rupiah, which has depreciated about 25 percent against the US dollar since the start of 2013, results in a ballooning of fuel subsidy spending. In the Revised State Budget of 2013, fuel subsidies were set at IDR 199.9 trillion but after the rupiah's downslide, another IDR 50 trillion is needed to cover the imports.

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  • Signing of Nippon Asahan's Inalum Share Sale to Indonesian Government

    Signing of Nippon Asahan's Inalum Share Sale to Indonesian Government

    At the start of the week, Japan sold its 58.88 percent stake in Indonesia Asahan Aluminium (Inalum) to the Indonesian government for a price of USD $556.7 million. At a ceremony held in Jakarta, witnessed by various Indonesian ministers and Japanese government officials, the agreement was signed. Talks about the sale of Japan's stake were difficult and lengthy, almost needing resolution by arbitration, due to disagreement about he value of Japan's stake. This then triggered concerns that Indonesia-Japan relations were in jeopardy.

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  • Indonesia's Electricity Tariffs Raised to Curb Energy Subsidy Spending

    Indonesia's Electricity Tariffs Raised to Curb Energy Subsidy Spending

    Perusahaan Listrik Negara (PLN), Indonesia's state-owned company that has a monopoly on the supply and distribution of electricity in Indonesia, introduces the final installment of this year's electricity price hike today (01/10). Electricity tariffs are raised by 4.3 percent each quarter of 2013 as the government tries to curb huge energy subsidies. Poorer households (450 to 900 VA) are not affected by these price adjustments. After the price hikes in January, April, July and October, electricity tariffs will have risen about 15 percent in total in 2013.

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  • Indonesia's Economic Growth Expected at 6.1% in Semester I-2013

    According to Finance minister Chatib Basri, the Indonesian government expects the country's gross domestic product (GDP) to have grown by 6.1 percent in the first six months of 2013. This forecast falls short of the government's 6.3 percent GDP growth assumption in the state budget (APBN). Basri stated that the lower outcome is due to global factors, such as slowing economic growth in China and India. But the government's assumption is more optimistic than the forecast of the central bank, which expects growth between 5.1 and 5.9 percent.

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  • Indonesia Economic Quarterly World Bank Report: Adjusting to Pressures

    On 2 July 2013, the World Bank released its July edition of the Indonesia Economic Quarterly. The report, titled Adjusting to Pressures, touches on the key developments over the past three months in Indonesia’s economy and places these in a longer term and global context. It regularly updates the outlook for the country’s economy and social welfare, and provides a more in-depth examination of selected economic and policy topics, as well as analyses of medium term development challenges.

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  • Economy of Indonesia Projected to Grow 6% in Quarter II 2013

    According to Bambang Brodjonegoro, current head of the Fiscal Agency (a department under the wings of Indonesia's Finance Ministry), Indonesia's economy will grow 6.0 percent in the second quarter of 2013. This growth rate is lower than originally forecast due to the impact of a global unstable environment. Economic growth in Q2-2013 is also likely to be below the Q1-2013 result of 6.02 percent. A few weeks ago, the government of Indonesia had already revised down its GDP forecast for 2013 from 6.8 percent to 6.3 percent.

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  • New Macroeconomic Assumptions in Indonesia's Revised State Budget

    DPR MPR Building Government of Indonesia Investments

    After a long plenary session on Monday (17/06), Indonesia's House of Representatives (DPR) and the government have agreed to the revised 2013 State Budget (APBN-P). The revision was needed as original macroeconomic assumptions began to fall out of tune with reality. Due to global and domestic conditions a number of assumptions needed to revised down. Most controversial decision that was taken is the increase in price of subsidized fuel by 44 percent to IDR 6,500 (USD $0.66) per liter.

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  • Indonesian Government and Commission XI Agree on Budget Revision

    The Indonesian government and Commission XI of the House of Representatives (DPR) agreed on several macroeconomic projections for the 2013 Revised State Budget (RAPBN-P 2013). The government requested a number of modifications to the 2013 State Budget as earlier assumptions, mentioned in the original 2013 State Budget, were not in line with the current economic conditions. Before reaching the agreement, fractions in the commission changed a number of proposed revisions of the government.

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Latest Columns State Budget

  • Despite Deviations Indonesia Won't Revise the 2018 State Budget

    Despite Deviations Indonesia Won't Revise the 2018 State Budget

    The Indonesian government decided not to revise its 2018 State Budget despite the fact that a couple of assumptions in the budget - such as the rupiah exchange rate or the oil price - differ markedly from the actual (real) level in the first half of 2018. After a meeting at the Presidential Palace in Bogor, Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati told reporters that President Joko Widodo will not adjust these assumptions due to a number of considerations.

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  • State Budget Indonesia: Realization & Performance in Q1-2018

    State Budget Indonesia: Realization & Performance in Q1-2018

    The Indonesian government expects the nation's gross domestic product (GDP) to have expanded 5.2 percent year-on-year (y/y) in the first quarter of 2018. Indonesian Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati detects a strengthening domestic economy, supported by improved tax income and improved government spending in Q1-2018.

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  • Looking Back at 2017: Success & Failure of State Budget Targets

    Looking Back at 2017: Success & Failure of State Budget Targets

    Although realization of most components in Indonesia's state budget have improved in 2017, tax revenue realization and the management of energy subsidies remain the two big challenges for the Indonesian government. Southeast Asia's largest economy again failed to meet its tax revenue target last year. Per 31 December 2017 it collected IDR 1,151.5 trillion (approx. USD $85.3 billion) in tax revenue, only 89.74 percent of the target (excluding customs and excise).

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  • Fiscal Update Indonesia: Government Wants to Revise 2016 State Budget

    Fiscal Update Indonesia: Government Wants to Revise 2016 State Budget

    The government of Indonesia proposes to cut the state revenue target by IDR 88 trillion (approx. USD $6.5 billion) in the Revised 2016 State Budget. Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro announced the government has sent the proposal to the House of Representatives’ Budget Committee (Banggar) on Thursday (02/06). Expectations of lower government revenue is the result of weaker-than-estimated tax collection, the lower-than-initially-assumed Indonesian crude oil price as well as the lower-than- estimated oil and gas production in Indonesia.

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  • Government Revenue Collection Indonesia at 23% of 2016 Target in Early May

    Government Revenue Collection Indonesia at 23% of 2016 Target in Early May

    So far this year, realization of government revenue in Indonesia (up to 8 May 2016) has reached IDR 419.2 trillion (approx. USD $32 billion), roughly 23 percent of the full-year revenue target in 2016 (IDR 1,822.5 trillion). This result is weaker compared to last year when the government collected IDR 476.3 trillion in the period 1 January - 15 May 2015, or 27 percent of the full-year target. Meanwhile, government spending reached IDR 586.8 trillion between 1 January and 8 May 2016, or 28 percent of the full-year target (IDR 2,095.7 trillion), roughly the same as government spending during the same period last year.

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  • Indonesia in April: State Budget & 7-day Reverse Repurchase Rate

    Indonesia in April: State Budget & 7-day Reverse Repurchase Rate

    If we look back on the month of April, two important matters - related to the economy - occurred in Indonesia this month: (1) in the first week of April, the Indonesian government managed to complete the Revised 2016 State Budget (RAPBN-P 2016), and, one week later, (2) the central bank (Bank Indonesia) announced it will adopt a new benchmark monetary tool per 19 August 2016 - the so-called seven-day reverse repurchase rate - that is to replace the existing BI rate (which fails to influence market liquidity effectively).

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  • Non-Optimal Public Spending on Infrastructure Development in Indonesia

    Non-Optimal Public Spending on Infrastructure Development in Indonesia

    Public spending on infrastructure development in Indonesia is not optimal. Sofyan Djalil, Indonesia's National Development Planning Minister as well as Head of the National Development Planning Agency (Bappenas), says immature and non-integrated planning between ministries and other government agencies as well as between the central and regional governments cause inefficient and non-optimal infrastructure spending. Non-optimal infrastructure development implies that Indonesia's overall economic growth as well as social development cannot achieve its full potential.

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  • What is the Problem with Tax Collection in Indonesia?

    What is the Problem with Tax Collection in Indonesia?

    A tax amnesty bill, which protects corruptors from prosecution and penalties when bringing overseas funds back to Indonesia and fulfill tax obligations, will soon be discussed among Indonesia's government and the House of Representatives (DPR). A tax pardon is expected to result in enhanced tax collection next year. According to the latest data from Indonesia's Finance Ministry's Tax Directorate General, the country only managed to collect IDR 686 trillion (approx. USD $51 billion), or 53 percent of its 2015 tax revenue target, in the period 1 January - 5 October 2015.

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  • Update on Infrastructure Development in Indonesia under Joko Widodo

    Update on Infrastructure Development in Indonesia under Joko Widodo

    The Finance Ministry of Indonesia announced that it plans to inject USD 1.63 billion into state-owned financing company Sarana Multi Infrastruktur and to transform this company into an infrastructure bank in a move to boost infrastructure development across Southeast Asia’s largest economy. The central government needs private capital to fund its massive infrastructure program for the next five years as it can only account for 30 percent of required investment. For the remainder it relies on private capital and state-owned enterprises.

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