Below is a list with tagged columns and company profiles.

Today's Headlines Inequality

  • Inequality in Indonesia: 4 Richest Equal 100 Million Poorest

    Inequality in Indonesia: 4 Richest Equal 100 Million Poorest

    A recent report released by Oxfam, a global aid and development charity, highlights the alarming level of income distribution inequality in Indonesia. According to the findings of this report, the four wealthiest Indonesians (combined) have more assets compared to the 100 million poorest Indonesians (combined). Indonesia's top four billionaires are worth USD $25 billion, which is approximately the same combined amount owned by the bottom 40 percent of the Indonesian population.

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  • Strategies to Combat Indonesia's Income Distribution Inequality

    Strategies to Combat Indonesia's Income Distribution Inequality

    Income distribution inequality is a problem in Indonesia, one that can jeopardize social, political and economic cohesion in Southeast Asia's largest economy. When looking at the Gini ratio, which is the coefficient that measures the degree of inequality in income distribution, we see a sharp rise in income inequality in Indonesia in the post-Suharto era. Thus, democracy and decentralization created an environment that allowed for rising inequality. While in the 1990s Indonesia's Gini ratio stood at an average of 0.30, it rose to an average of 0.39 in the 2000s, and remained stable at 0.41 in the years 2011-2015 before easing slightly to 0.40 in 2016.

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  • Economic Development Indonesia Too Java-Centered, Inequality Rises

    Economic Development Indonesia Too Java-Centered, Inequality Rises

    The Institute for Development of Economics and Finance (Indef) argues that economic development that has occurred during the first two years of the government under the leadership of President Joko Widodo is too much centered on the island of Java, Indonesia's most populous island and the political and economic center of Southeast Asia's largest economy. Java, particularly the Greater Jakarta region, contributes about 60 percent to the total Indonesian economy.

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  • GINI Ratio Indonesia Declines: Economic Inequality Narrows

    GINI Ratio Indonesia Declines: Economic Inequality Narrows

    According to the latest data from Indonesia's Statistics Agency (BPS), wealth disparity has narrowed slightly in Indonesia, reflected by a declining Gini ratio from 0.408 in March 2015 to 0.397 in March 2016 (zero represents perfect equality, while 1 represents perfect inequality). This development is attributed to several matters, including rising earnings among Indonesia's middle-income segment. BPS noted that this increase comes on the back of government-led labor-intensive infrastructure development projects.

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  • Indonesia's Gini Ratio Fell in 2015; Concerns about Social Cohesion Persist

    Indonesia's Gini Ratio Fell in 2015; Concerns about Social Cohesion Persist

    Indonesia's Gini ratio (or Gini coefficient), which measures the degree of inequality in income distribution, improved slightly in September 2015. According to the latest data published by Statistics Indonesia (BPS), the Gini ratio of Indonesia fell from 0.41 in March 2015 to 0.40 in September 2015, indicating that income distribution inequality slightly declined (a coefficient of zero expresses perfect equality, while a reading of 1 implies maximal inequality). The modest improvement occurred in the urban areas of Indonesia where the Gini ratio fell 0.1 point to 0.43. In the rural areas the ratio remained stagnant at 0.33.

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  • OECD: Improve Job Quality, Reduce Gender Inequality for Economic Growth

    In the latest report of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) the institution emphasizes that gender equality in employment should be promoted by governments in order to combat income inequality and thus achieve not only a more just and harmonious society but also boost inclusive economic growth. In most countries gender equality remains a matter of concern. The report also states that governments should not ignore the importance of broadening access to jobs and encourage investment in education.

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  • Unemployment Rate of Indonesia Rises Slightly in August 2014

    Amid slowing economic growth, Indonesia’s unemployment rate increased slightly in August 2014. On Wednesday (05/11), Statistics Indonesia announced that 7.24 million Indonesians, or 5.94 percent of the country’s labour force, were without a job. In the previous unemployment report (covering conditions in the month February 2014), Indonesia’s unemployment rate stood at 5.70 percent of the country’s labour force (about 7.15 million Indonesians). The government agency releases Indonesia’s unemployment data twice per year.

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  • Indonesia Needs to Focus on Internet Development to Boost GDP Growth

    The new cabinet of Joko Widodo is advised to further develop Indonesia’s Internet industry as enhanced Internet connectivity across the vast archipelago will result in higher economic growth. Internet has become such a vital communication channel in governance, business and private lives that a direct link to economic growth is detectable. Recently, an official at Indonesia’s Development Planning Agency (Bappenas) said that with every ten percent growth in number of Internet users, the economy expands by an additional 1.2-1.4 percent.

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  • World Bank: Poverty Reduction in Indonesia Slows; Inequality Rises

    The World Bank released a news update which states that poverty reduction in Indonesia continues to slow down, with only a reduction of 0.7 percentage points over the last two years, or the smallest decline in the last decade. Meanwhile the institution says that inequality also increased in recent years, potentially disrupting social cohesion and hence jeopardizing the gains from solid economic growth, which has helped to reduce the poverty rate to 11.3 percent in 2014, compared to 24 percent in 1999.

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  • Perceived Growing Income Distribution Inequality in Indonesia

    According to a survey conducted by Lembaga Survei Indonesia (LSI) most Indonesians believe that Indonesian society is characterized by a high degree of income distribution inequality. Over 90 percent of respondents see income inequality in Indonesia, while about 40 percent of respondents believe there is no equality at all regarding income distribution in Indonesia. With the gap between the country’s rich and poor widening, social cohesion and higher economic growth are at stake in Southeast Asia’s largest economy.

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Latest Columns Inequality

  • Rising Income Inequality in Indonesia: the Social Threat

    Rising Income Inequality in Indonesia: the Social Threat

    Although the government of Indonesia aims to lower the country's Gini coefficient to 39 in 2016, there continue to be more reports that see income inequality in Indonesia widening rather than declining. For example, a recent World Bank report notes that Indonesia's Gini coefficient rose from 30 in 2000 to 41 in 2015 (a reading of 0 represents perfect equality, while a reading of 100 represents perfect inequality). This rising trend will continue if the government fails to tackle this issue.

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  • Income Inequality in Indonesia Threatens Social, Economic & Political Stability

    Income Inequality in Indonesia Threatens Social, Economic & Political Stability

    The World Bank says income inequality in Indonesia is widening and as a consequence the fruits of Indonesia's economic growth over the past decade have only been enjoyed by the richest 20 percent of Indonesian society, leaving behind the remaining 80 percent of the population (or 200 million people). In its new report titled "Indonesia's Rising Divide" the World Bank states that rising inequality in society can jeopardize social cohesion, as well as political and economic stability over the long term. The report claims that inequality in Indonesia has reached a relatively high level and is climbing faster than in most of its regional peers.

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  • Prabowo Subianto and Jokowi Should Focus on Equality, Not GDP Growth

    Prabowo Subianto and Jokowi Should Focus on Equality, Not GDP Growth

    Senior economist at the Institute for Development of Economics and Finance (INDEF), Didier Damanhuri, believes that Indonesia’s two presidential candidates - Joko Widodo (popularly known as Jokowi) and Prabowo Subianto - are both similar in economic approach as both men are primarily focused on high gross domestic product (GDP) growth as the measurement for economic development, while, in fact, many countries that only focus on GDP growth show a high degree of economic inequality.

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  • The Issue of Inequality Within Indonesia's Booming Economy

    The economy of Indonesia is booming with gross domestic product (GDP) surpassing six percent on an annual basis. And the country's strong economic fundamentals are confirmed by increasing international attention. But within the context of this economic growth it is important to take a look at whether economic growth is shared by all segments of Indonesian society. If, for example, only the higher classes of Indonesia would benefit from the economic boom, it could give rise to social issues in the future.

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  • Indonesian Democracy & its Rising Consumer Class: Three Bottlenecks (Part II)

    Agung Budiono - Pol-Tracking Institute - Indonesia Investments - Indonesian Democracy

    In my previous column, I outlined the emergence of a new and promising class of Indonesian consumers that is most likely to bring a positive effect on the country's economic growth in the years ahead. I also pointed out that the level of prosperity of a population is an influential factor towards the state (and future) of democracy in a country: the wealthier a population becomes in terms of per capita GDP, the longer the life expectancy of its democracy will be.

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