Below is a list with tagged columns and company profiles.

Today's Headlines Domestic Consumption

  • Indonesian Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Talks Economic Growth

    Indonesian Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Talks Economic Growth

    Indonesian Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati believes economic growth of Indonesia in 2017 can exceed the target that was set by the central government in the state budget. While the official target in the 2017 State Budget was set at 5.1 percent year-on-year (y/y), Sri Mulyani expects to see the growth rate at 5.2 percent (y/y) on the back of rising consumption and investment, while she predicts an end to the trend of falling imports and exports.

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  • Will Donald Trump's Protectionist Policies Impact on Indonesia?

    Will Donald Trump's Protectionist Policies Impact on Indonesia?

    Frederic Neumann, Managing Director and Co-Head of Asian Economics Research at HSBC, says Indonesia is well positioned to feel limited impact only of US president-elect Donald Trump's (looming) protectionist policies as Indonesia's export performance contributes a mere 21.1 percent to the nation's gross domestic product (GDP). It is in fact domestic consumption that forms the backbone of the Indonesian macroeconomy, accounting for about 56 percent of GDP, and thus provides a buffer against global turmoil.

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  • Gov't & World Bank Cut Indonesia's 2016 GDP Growth Forecast to 5.1%

    Gov't & World Bank Cut Indonesia's 2016 GDP Growth Forecast to 5.1%

    In line with expectations, the government of Indonesia revised down its economic growth target in 2016 from 5.3 percent (y/y) to 5.1 percent (y/y) amid subdued private consumption, slower-than-expected private investment, and low commodity prices. Meanwhile, the World Bank also cut its forecast for Indonesia's economic growth in 2016 to 5.1 percent (y/y), down from its earlier prediction of 5.3 percent (y/y). The World Bank also slashed its outlook for global growth from 2.9 percent (y/y) to 2.4 percent (y/y) this year.

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  • GDP Growth: Slowing Household Consumption in Indonesia is Worrisome

    GDP Growth: Slowing Household Consumption in Indonesia is Worrisome

    Efforts to raise people's purchasing power and household consumption in Indonesia will be key to push for higher economic growth in 2016. According to the latest data from Statistics Indonesia (BPS), Indonesia's gross domestic product (GDP) growth reached 4.92 percent (y/y) in the first quarter of 2016. Although this result failed to meet analysts' projections (which generally stood around 5 percent y/y), it was higher than the 4.73 percent (y/y) economic growth pace that was posted in the same quarter one year earlier.

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  • Inflation Indonesia: Heightened Money Circulation due to Ramadan & Idul Fitri

    Inflation Indonesia: Heightened Money Circulation due to Ramadan & Idul Fitri

    The holy Islamic fasting month (Ramadan) is set to start in early June. One month later Indonesia will celebrate Idul Fitri (Lebaran), the celebration that marks the end of the Ramadan month. During Idul Fitri millions of Indonesians will travel back to their places of origin to spend some time with their families, a tradition called mudik. Although the Ramadan is a month characterized by self-control, this month and the subsequent Idul Fitri celebrations always cause rising consumption of food products as well as rising consumer spending on clothes, shoes, bags, and other articles.

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  • Indonesia's Higher Non-Taxable Income to Influence Consumption?

    Indonesia's Higher Non-Taxable Income to Influence Consumption?

    Indonesia's plan to  raise people's (annual) non-taxable income by 50 percent to IDR 54 million (approx. USD $4,090) is estimated to add 0.3 percentage point to consumption growth in Indonesia according to Indonesia's Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro. Last week, Brodjonegoro announced this tax incentive with the aim to strengthen Indonesians' purchasing power and encourage household consumption. Household consumption, which accounts for about 56 percent of Indonesia's overall economic growth, has been curtailed in recent years amid slowing economic growth, high inflation and the weak rupiah rate (against the US dollar).

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  • Indonesia’s Higher Import Duties on Consumer Goods to Backfire?

    Indonesia’s Higher Import Duties on Consumer Goods to Backfire?

    In an effort to boost the domestic consumer goods industry, the Indonesian government today (23/07) raised import tariffs for food, cars, clothes and many other consumer goods. This seemingly protectionist measure is aimed at reducing Indonesia’s dependence on imported goods as well as to boost the country’s general economic growth, which has slowed to a six-year low of 4.71 percent (y/y) in the first quarter of 2015, by supporting development of the local consumer goods industry.

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  • Trade Balance Indonesia: Import and Export Fall in January 2015

    Trade Balance Indonesia: Imports and Export Fall in January 2015

    Indonesia posted a USD $709.4 million trade surplus in January 2015 according to the latest data from Statistics Indonesia (BPS) released on Monday (16/02). Although the surplus is higher than expected and thus has a positive impact on the country’s trade and current account balances, the data also indicated that exports fell 8.09 percent year-on-year (y/y) to USD $13.30 billion signalling continued weakening global demand for Indonesian exports. Meanwhile, Indonesian imports shrank by 15.6 percent (y/y) to USD $12.59 billion.

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  • Higher Fuel Prices in Indonesia Are Consumers' Top Concern

    Indonesian consumers are concerned about the looming subsidized fuel price hike this month according to the latest survey of Nielsen, a global information and measurement company. Based on the Nielsen Global Survey of Consumer Confidence and Spending Intentions (covering the third quarter of 2014), 28% of respondents said that higher prices of subsidized fuels are among their top two main concerns. In the previous survey (which covered Q2-2014), the subsidized fuel price hike was not even mentioned among the top five concerns.

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  • Chatib Basri: Indonesia’s Economic Growth May Reach 5.5% in 2014

    In response to the recent World Bank report that projects economic growth of Indonesia at 5.2 percent (year-on-year, yoy) in 2014, the Indonesian government is still optimistic that gross domestic product (GDP) growth of Southeast Asia’s largest economy can reach 5.5 percent this year. Indonesian Finance minister Chatib Basri said that household consumption, which traditionally accounts for about 55 percent of the country’s total economic growth, is expected to remain strong in 2014 and thus support GDP growth.

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Latest Columns Domestic Consumption

  • HSBC: Indonesia's Economic Growth 5% in 2nd Quarter of 2016

    HSBC: Indonesia's Economic Growth 5% in 2nd Quarter of 2016

    Although Indonesia's economic growth in the first quarter of 2016 was below analysts' estimates, most analysts agree that the nation's economic growth in the second quarter of the year could reach 5 percent (y/y), supported by domestic consumption and capital inflows. In Q1-2016 Indonesia's economic growth climbed at a pace of 4.92 percent (y/y) - accelerating from the 4.73 percent (y/y) GDP growth pace in the same quarter one year earlier - but significantly below estimates of most analysts. For example, Bank Indonesia expected GDP growth around 5.1 - 5.2 percent (y/y).

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  • The Indonesian Case: the Consumer Economy & Economic Growth

    The Indonesian Case: the Consumer Economy & Economic Growth

    The Indonesian economy, from the expenditure side, is highly dominated by domestic demand. From Q1-2010 to Q1-2015, the average role of domestic demand reached 99.5 percent, with the lowest level at 96.8 percent. The positive side of this situation is that the Indonesian economy is relatively resilient to external factors. History shows that despite the US subprime mortgage crisis and financial crisis in Europe, economic growth in Indonesia remained relatively high and consistent compared to other countries.

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  • Indonesia Investment Summit 2015: Challenges & Pillars of the Economy

    Indonesia Investment Summit 2015: Challenges & Pillars of the Economy

    In his presentation at the Indonesia Investment Summit 2015, organized in Jakarta on 15-16 January, Standard Chartered Bank Senior Economist Fauzi Ichsan said that despite the challenges amid global uncertain times, there remains plenty room and opportunity for Indonesia to grow robustly on the long-term. In fact, by 2030 Ichsan believes that Indonesia will be among the world's top ten countries in terms of largest economies. For investors it is important to understand the challenges and key pillars of economic growth.

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  • What about Indonesia's Economic Growth in 2014? Growing or Slowing?

    After Statistics Indonesia (BPS) had announced on Monday (05/05) that Indonesia's gross domestic product (GDP) grew by 5.21 percent year-on-year (yoy) in the first quarter of 2014 (considerably below analysts' projections of around 5.6 percent), concerns have risen about the country's economic expansion for the remainder of the year. The government of Indonesia targets a GDP growth rate of between 5.8 and 6.0 percent (yoy). However, several international institutions do not agree with this optimistic target.

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  • What about Indonesia's Domestic Consumption in 2014?

    Recently, Statistics Indonesia (BPS) released various data in the context of Indonesia's gross domestic product (GDP). Economic expansion of Southeast Asia's largest economy slowed to 5.78 percent (year-on-year) in 2013. Household consumption accounted for the largest share of Indonesia's GDP (55.8 percent) and continued to grow significantly (5.28 percent yoy) in 2013. This consumer force is one of the main reasons why many foreign companies enter and expand their businesses in Indonesia.

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  • From BRIC to MINT Countries: Will Indonesia Become a Powerhouse?

    From BRIC to MINT Countries: Will Indonesia Become the Next Powerhouse?

    Over a decade ago, economist Jim O'Neill became famous for the introduction of the term BRIC (indicating the promising economic perspectives of Brazil, Russia, India and China). Now the BRICs have lost some of its significance, he has turned to a new acronym: MINT. These MINT countries - consisting of Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey - share a number of features that make them potential giant economies in the future: promising demographic structure, strategic geographical location, and commodity-rich soil.

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  • Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit Will Continue to Ease in 2014

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) estimates that Indonesia's current account deficit will ease to 3.5 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) by the end of 2013. Indonesia's wide current account deficit has been one of the major financial troubles this year and managed to weaken investors' confidence in Southeast Asia's largest economy. Thus, Indonesia became one of the hardest hit emerging countries after the Federal Reserve started to speculate about an ending to its quantitative easing program.

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  • Indonesia Most Popular Investment Destination for Japanese Expansion

    Indonesia Most Popular Investment Destination for Japanese Expansion

    According to a survey of the Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC), 44.9 percent of respondents assessed Indonesia as the most promising investment destination for the next three years. The respondents in this survey involved 500 Japanese companies that engage in international businesses. For Indonesia it is the first time in 21 years that it forms the preferred choice of overseas investments for Japanese companies, thus replacing China. In 2013, Japan already dominates foreign direct investment in Indonesia.

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  • Indonesia’s Slowing Economic Growth: the Case of Private Consumption

    Indonesia’s Slowing Economic Growth: the Case of Private Consumption

    Forecasts for Indonesia’s gross domestic product (GDP) growth in 2013 and beyond have been revised down by all institutions, including the Indonesian government and central bank as well as international organizations such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Initially, the country’s economic growth was expected to reach around 6.5 percent in 2013. However, most institutions have downgraded forecasts for the country’s economic growth to below the 6.0 percent mark.

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  • Economic Update Indonesia: Interest Rate, Inflation, GDP and Trade Balance

    Bank Indonesia’s Board of Governors decided to hold the BI Rate at a level of 7.25 percent, with rates on the Lending Facility and Deposit Facility held respectively at 7.25 percent and 5.50 percent. Bank Indonesia will continue to monitor global and domestic developments and further synergise the monetary and macroprudential policy mix in order to ensure that inflationary pressures remain under control, that rupiah exchange rate stability is maintained according to its fundamentals and the current account deficit is reduced to a sustainable level.

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