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Today's Headlines Current Account

  • Current Account Balance Remains Achilles' Heel of Indonesia

    Current Account Balance Remains Achilles' Heel of Indonesia

    Indonesia’s current account deficit widened to USD $31.1 billion, equivalent to 2.98 percent of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP), in full-year 2018. It is a big deterioration compared to the USD $17.29 billion deficit (1.7 percent of GDP) in the preceding year. It means the current account balance remains the Achilles’ heel of the Indonesian economy, one that - potentially - triggers rapid and large capital outflows in times of global economic turmoil.

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  • World Bank Releases June 2018 Indonesia Economic Quarterly

    World Bank Releases June 2018 Indonesia Economic Quarterly

    In the World Bank's latest Indonesia Economic Quarterly (June 2018 edition) there are plenty of positive words about the Indonesian economy, such as robust economic growth, low inflation, rising investment, growing government spending, and prudent monetary policy. However, the World Bank also detects some "substantial and mostly external" risks that lurk about. Below is the summary of the World Bank's latest Indonesia Economic Quarterly, entitled "Learning More, Growing Faster".

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  • Current Account Balance of Indonesia: Expected to Widen in 2018

    Current Account Balance of Indonesia: Expected to Widen in 2018

    Indonesia's current account balance - the sum of the balance of trade (goods and services exports less imports), net income from abroad and net current transfers - showed a deficit of 1.7 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2017, narrowly improving from a 1.8 percent deficit in the preceding year and constituting the lowest deficit since 2012.

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  • When Will Indonesia's Current Account Record a Surplus Again?

    When Will Indonesia's Current Account Record a Surplus Again?

    Indonesia's current account balance is expected to show a deficit for the next five years. The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) does not rule out a surplus within that period but it would require some serious work in terms of structural reform-making. Indonesia started to record current account deficits in late-2011 due to the ballooning oil import bill (before the government slashed energy subsidies) and weak commodity prices after 2011.

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  • UBS Investment Bank: Indonesia's GDP Growth at 4.8% in 2017

    UBS Investment Bank: Indonesia's GDP Growth at 4.8% in 2017

    UBS Investment Bank is less positive about Indonesia's economic growth in 2017 compared to most other institutions. The global financial services company, with its headquarters in Switzerland, expects to see the Indonesian economy growing by 4.8 percent year-on-year (y/y) in 2017. Edward Teather, Senior Economist for ASEAN and India at UBS, says the year 2017 is a year of adjustment and balancing for Southeast Asia's largest economy, while the role of fiscal support toward GDP growth is also seen declining this year. He added that 2018 will be the year in which Indonesia should see strongly accelerating economic growth.

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  • Current Account Balance Update Indonesia: Deficit is Improving

    Current Account Balance Update Indonesia: Deficit is Improving

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects Indonesia's current account deficit to have improved to below 2 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) in the third quarter of 2016. This is good news as a wide (and structural) current account deficit is considered a financial weakness because it means the country is building up liabilities to the rest of the world. Ever since late-2011 Indonesia has been suffering a wide current account deficit. This is particularly attributed to the globe's low commodity prices after 2011.

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  • Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 2.2% of GDP in FY-2016

    Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit at 2.2% of GDP in FY-2016

    Bank Indonesia, the central bank of Indonesia, expects the country's current account deficit to increase to USD $4.8 billion - or about 2.2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) - in full-year 2016. Although the deficit remains high - and is forecast to go higher - there is optimism that this increase is caused by rising imports of capital goods and raw materials. These goods and materials are used to manufacture new products (that may be exported from Indonesia) and therefore have a positive impact on the economy (in contrast to consumer product imports that bring few future economic value).

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  • Indonesia's Current Account Deficit Data Released - Quick Walkthrough

    Indonesia's Current Account Deficit Data Released

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) announced on Friday (12/02) that Indonesia's current account deficit widened to 2.39 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP), or USD $5.1 billion, in the fourth quarter of 2015 from a deficit of 1.94 percent of GDP (USD $4.2 billion) in the preceding quarter. This increase was due to a decline in the non-oil & gas trade balance surplus as non-oil & gas imports grew 7.5 percent (q/q) amid higher domestic demand amid accelerating economic growth in the last quarter of 2015.

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  • LPS: Indonesia's Current Account Deficit Widens in 2016 & 2017

    LPS: Indonesia's Current Account Deficit Widens in 2016 & 2017

    The Indonesia Deposit Insurance Corporation (in Indonesian: Lembaga Penjamin Simpanan, or LPS) expects to see Indonesia's current account deficit growing to USD $20.8 billion, equivalent to 2.3 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP), in 2016. In the following year, the institution estimates that the current account deficit will continue to widen toward USD $25.1 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) due to an expected decline in Indonesia's trade surplus.

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  • Current Account Deficit Indonesia Improves on Weak Imports

    Current Account Deficit Indonesia Improves on Weak Imports

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) announced on Friday (14/08) that the country’s current account deficit narrowed to USD $4.48 billion, or 2.1 percent of gross domestic product (GDP), in the second quarter of 2015. In the same quarter last year the deficit stood at USD $9.59 billion). As such, the current account deficit (CAD) has become more sustainable and this may provide some support for the rupiah which is currently facing tough times (ahead of a looming US interest rate and China’s yuan devaluation).

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Latest Columns Current Account

  • Update Indonesia's Q1-2016 Balance of Payments & Current Account

    Update Indonesia's Q1-2016 Balance of Payments & Current Account

    Indonesia's balance of payments registered a deficit in the first quarter of 2016. Based on the latest data from Indonesia's central bank (Bank Indonesia), the deficit stood at USD $287 million in Q1-2016, down from a USD $1.3 billion surplus in the same quarter last year. The balance of payments deficit was the result of the nation's Q1-2016 capital and financial transaction surpluses (USD $4.17 billion) not being able to cover the current account deficit (CAD). Indonesia's Q1-2016 CAD shrank to USD $4.67 billion, or 2.14 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP).

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  • Current Account Indonesia in Check, Worry about Import and Capital & Financial Account

    Current Account Indonesia in Check, Worry about Import and Capital & Financial Account

    Indonesia's current account deficit eased to USD $4.01 billion, or 1.86 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP), in the third quarter of 2015. The central bank (Bank Indonesia) said this improvement is particularly caused by a stronger non-oil & gas trade balance. However, Indonesia's capital and financial account surplus declined to USD $1.2 billion, causing the balance of payments deficit to widen to USD $4.6 billion from USD $2.9 billion in the preceding quarter.

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  • Indonesia’s Current Account Deficit Explained: Why, What, When & How?

    Indonesia’s Current Account Deficit Explained: Why, What, When & How?

    Since late 2011 Indonesia has been plagued by a structural current account deficit (CAD) that has worried both policymakers and (foreign) investors. Despite Indonesian authorities having implemented policy reforms and economic adjustments in recent years, the country’s CAD remains little-changed in 2015. The World Bank and Bank Indonesia both expect the CAD to persist at slightly below 3 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product (GDP) in 2015, alarmingly close to the boundary that separates a sustainable from an unsustainable deficit.

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  • Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit Improved in 3rd Quarter 2014

    Bank Indonesia: Current Account Deficit Improved in 3rd Quarter 2014

    The wide current account deficit of Indonesia is expected to have eased in the third quarter of 2014. According to information from the country’s central bank, the current account deficit narrowed to 3.1 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in Q3-2014 from 4.27 percent of GDP in the previous quarter. A deficit below the level of 3 percent of GDP is generally regarded as a sustainable level. The improvement in Q3-2014 is mainly due to resumed mineral exports after the government and several miners managed to finalize renegotiations.

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  • Indonesian Property Stocks Gain Most in First 8 Months of 2014

    Indonesian Property Stocks Gain Most in First 8 Months of 2014

    Property stocks listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX) have outperformed all other stocks between the first trading day of 2014 up to 29 August 2014. The IDX’ property sector category rose 37.6 percent in the indicated period, whereas the benchmark stock index (Jakarta Composite Index, abbreviated IHSG) - which involves all stocks traded on the IDX - climbed 18.7 percent over the same period. On the IDX, stocks are placed in ten sectoral categories. The second-best performing sectoral index was finance (+24.5 percent).

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  • Indonesia's Main Stock Index (IHSG) Falls 1.37 Percent on Thursday

    Asian stock markets were mixed on Thursday (30/05). Particularly Hong Kong's Hang Seng Index (HSI) was negatively influenced by Wednesday's falling stock indices in Europe and the USA. In this context, Indonesia's main index (IHSG) was hit as well and fell 1.37 percent to 5,129.65 points. Moreover, the continuing decline of the IDR rupiah makes market participants less enthusiastic to purchase Indonesian stocks. Foreigners were also anxious to sell part of their stock portfolios.

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