Below is a list with tagged columns and company profiles.

Today's Headlines Tax Compliance

  • Tax Buoyancy Indonesia: GDP Growth & Tax Revenue are Asynchronous

    Tax Buoyancy Indonesia: GDP Growth & Tax Revenue are Asynchronous

    There is concern about Indonesia's tax buoyancy. Tax buoyancy is the indicator that measures efficiency and responsiveness of revenue mobilization in response to growth in gross domestic product (GDP) or national income. While, Indonesia's GDP accelerated 5.02 percent (y/y) in 2016, the country's tax revenue realization only rose 4.2 percent (y/y) to IDR 1,104.9 trillion (approx. USD $83.1 billion). Since 2011 (when commodity prices plunged heavily) tax buoyancy has been weakening in Indonesia.

    Read more ›

  • Tax Revenue Indonesia 2017: Another Shortfall Expected

    Tax Revenue Indonesia 2017: Another Shortfall Expected

    The last time Indonesia's tax revenue realization achieved the government's target was in 2008. In the following 8 years, a widening tax shortfall occurred as the government's tax revenue target rose more rapidly compared to tax revenue realization. In the 2017 State Budget Indonesia targets to collect IDR 1,498.9 trillion (approx. USD $111 billion) in tax revenue, while - based on the historic trend - tax revenue realization may only reach IDR 1,200 - 1,300 trillion, implying another big shortfall.

    Read more ›

  • Tax Amnesty Bill Indonesia Implemented in Late July 2016?

    Tax Amnesty Bill Indonesia Implemented in Late July 2016?

    Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro is optimistic that the Tax Amnesty Bill can be turned into law at the next meeting with the House of Representatives (DPR). Although not all 27 articles of the Tax Amnesty Bill have been discussed yet among both institutions, the most crucial articles have been debated and the DPR seems to agree that the bill will raise the government's tax revenue. The government and DPR agree that deliberations should be completed by 28 July 2016.

    Read more ›

  • Indonesia's Tax Revenue Weak in Q1-2016, Plans Personal Income Tax Rate Cut

    Indonesia's Tax Revenue Weak in Q1-2016, Plans Personal Income Tax Rate Cut

    Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro announced on Tuesday (05/04) that Indonesia's tax revenue reached IDR 194 trillion (approx. USD $14.7 billion) in the first quarter of 2016, down 2.1 percent from tax revenue in the same period one year earlier. Brodjonegoro blamed this poor result on lower income from value-added taxes (VATs) due to tax restitution and people's low consumption amid sluggish economic growth. Meanwhile, he informed that Indonesia plans to cut the personal income tax, a move aimed at boosting tax compliance.

    Read more ›

  • Tax Collection to Miss Target in 2015, Indonesia's Tax Chief Resigns

    The Director General of Indonesia's Tax Office, Sigit Priadi Pramudito, unexpectedly resigned from his post on Tuesday (01/12) as it became increasingly clear that there will be a big shortfall, perhaps up to IDR 250 trillion (approx. USD $18 billion), in the country's tax collection this year. In the Revised 2015 State Budget the Indonesian government targets to collect IDR 1,294.3 trillion (approx. USD $94 billion). Pramudito is the first tax chief to resign from his post in the modern history of Indonesia.

    Read more ›

  • Non-Taxable Threshold for Personal Income Tax in Indonesia to be Raised?

    Non-Taxable Threshold for Personal Income Tax in Indonesia to be Raised?

    Bambang Brodjonegoro, Indonesian Finance Minister, announced on Wednesday (27/05) that the Indonesian government may raise the income threshold - which separates individuals’ income that is taxable from non-taxable income - by almost 50 percent. Although this move would imply less tax revenue for the government, it would strengthen the purchasing power of the less fortunate Indonesians and can somewhat boost economic activity in an economy that has been plagued by slowing economic growth since 2011.

    Read more ›

  • Tax Compliance & Enforcement in Indonesia Remain Troublesome

    Fuad Rahmany, Director General of Taxes at the Indonesian Finance Ministry, said that state revenue from taxes will not achieve the target that has been set in the Revised 2014 State Budget (APBNP 2014). Rahmany expects that only 94 percent of the target, or about IDR 1,008 trillion (USD $84 billion) will be achieved (this figure excludes import duties and excise duties). Classical problems that cause Indonesia’s low tax-to-GDP ratio include low tax compliance, the low number of tax officials, and weak government coordination.

    Read more ›

  • Tax in Indonesia: Indonesian Tax-to-GDP Ratio and Tax Compliance Still Low

    The structure of tax revenue in Indonesia has not changed in the past decade resulting in the country’s still low tax-to-GDP ratio of between 12 and 13 percent. Emerging countries such as Indonesia typically have a low tax-to-GDP ratio as the government’s financial management is inadequate (and plagued by corruption). However, it is important for Indonesia to raise this ratio in order to have more funds available to finance the budget deficit, infrastructure development, healthcare, education and other social programs to combat poverty.

    Read more ›

  • Indonesian Government Wants more Tax out of Property Sector in 2014

    Business players in Indonesia's property sector are not happy with the government's intention to collect more tax from the sector in 2014 and onwards. The property sector has been one of the fastest growing sectors in Indonesia's economy in recent years as demand for property has surged significantly among Indonesia's expanding middle class, resulting in massive profit numbers for Indonesian property companies. Meanwhile, the government of Indonesia has been busy taking efforts to increase tax revenues.

    Read more ›

Latest Columns Tax Compliance

  • Minimum Threshold for Indonesia's "Bank Openness Law" Revised

    Minimum Threshold for Indonesia's "Bank Openness Law" Revised

    The government of Indonesia listened to the criticism that emerged after it decided to set a rather low threshold for bank accounts that are to become subject to the automatic bank information exchange program. Through Finance Ministry regulation PMK No. 70/PMK.03/2017 Indonesia's tax authorities obtain access to information on accounts held at financial institutions, including bank accounts. This new regulation makes it possible to check whether tax payers indeed fulfill their tax obligations.

    Read more ›

  • Which Bank Accounts Are Checked by Indonesia's Tax Authorities?

    There exists some resistance against the Indonesian government's recently announced regulation that gives tax authorities access to information on accounts held at financial institutions, including bank accounts. The regulation aims to contribute to a more transparent financial system as well as to boost the government's tax revenue realization (tax evaders will need to be more careful now authorities can monitor private and corporate bank accounts).

    Read more ›

  • Indonesia's Tax Authorities Can Monitor Taxpayers' Bank Accounts

    Indonesia's Tax Office now has more power to check whether people and companies indeed pay taxes. Last week the Indonesian government basically scrapped the existence of banking data secrecy by introducing a new regulation that gives the nation's tax authorities access to information on accounts held at financial institutions, including bank accounts. The new regulation should contribute to a more transparent financial system and boost the government's (much-need) tax revenue realization. However, Indonesian parliament still needs to approve the new regulation.

    Read more ›

  • Indonesia's Tax Amnesty Program to End Soon, Any Structural Impact?

    Indonesia's Tax Amnesty Program to End Soon, Any Structural Impact?

    Indonesia's tax amnesty program will end soon. The nine-month program was designed to finish on 31 March 2017. Although the program has become the world's most successful tax amnesty program, it will fail to solve Indonesia's tax revenue collection problems. And with tax revenue being the largest source for public spending capacity, low tax compliance in Southeast Asia's largest economy obstructs more rapid development of the Indonesian economy.

    Read more ›

  • Budget Deficit of Indonesia Under Control Thanks to Tax Amnesty

    Budget Deficit of Indonesia Under Control Thanks to Tax Amnesty

    Indonesia's budget deficit in 2016 is estimated to have reached 2.46 percent of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP), below the government's forecast of 2.7 percent of GDP and at a safe distance from the legal cap of 3.0 percent of GDP that is stipulated by Indonesian law. This is a positive matter that is supported by modestly growing tax revenue. In full-year 2016 tax revenue realization reached IDR 1,105.2 trillion (approx. USD $83 billion), only 81.6 percent of the target that was set in the Revised 2016 State Budget (APBN-P 2016) but slightly higher than tax revenue realization in the preceding year.

    Read more ›

  • Tax Amnesty Program Indonesia Launched: Which Investment Instruments?

    Tax Amnesty Program Indonesia Launched: Which Investment Instruments?

    Without giving too much insight into the details and regulations, Indonesian President Joko Widodo launched the tax amnesty program on Friday (01/07) during a speech in front of hundreds of businessmen and officials at Indonesia's tax office headquarters in Jakarta. The tax amnesty program - approved by the House of Representatives in late June - is a strategy to boost state tax income by (temporarily) granting amnesty as well as offering attractive incentives to (former) tax evaders. In return, the tax dodgers have to declare and (if wanted) repatriate their offshore assets into Indonesia.

    Read more ›

  • Tax System Indonesia: Plans to Cut Corporate Income Tax to 20%

    Tax System Indonesia: Plans to Cut Corporate Income Tax to 20%

    More changes to Indonesia's tax system are in the pipeline. Today (11/04), Indonesia's Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro said Southeast Asia's largest economy plans to cut the corporate income tax rate to 20 percent this year (from 25 percent currently). According to Brodjonegoro a 20 percent corporate tax rate is more competitive and will attract investment. Indonesia's finance minister expressed this plan in a meeting with the nation's parliamentary commission overseeing taxes (an income tax rate cut requires parliamentary approval).

    Read more ›

  • Indonesia Does Not Revise 2016 Tax Revenue Target, Realistic or Not?

    Indonesia Does Not Revise 2016 Tax Revenue Target, Realistic or Not?

    Indonesia's Finance Ministry said it will not revise the tax revenue target set in the 2016 State Budget. The Indonesian government targets to collect IDR 1,360.2 trillion (approx. USD $100 billion) worth of tax revenue in 2016, a 28.9 percent rise from tax revenue realization in 2015. However, although it is good to aim high - hence setting an ambitious target - it is also important to be realistic (to avoid budgetary turmoil and gain fiscal credibility, important for Indonesia to be eligible for a credit rating upgrade). How realistic is Indonesia's 2016 tax revenue target?

    Read more ›

  • Government of Indonesia to Cut Personal & Corporate Income Tax

    Government of Indonesia Plans to Cut Personal & Corporate Income Tax

    Good news for taxpayers in Indonesia. The Indonesian government plans to lower personal income tax, which currently ranges between 5 and 30 percent, in early 2016. Indonesian Finance Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro said lower personal income tax will make it easier for taxpayers to comply with the tax law, while giving a boost to Indonesians' purchasing power. However, he declined to inform to what extent personal income tax will be cut as this is still being studied.

    Read more ›

  • What is the Problem with Tax Collection in Indonesia?

    What is the Problem with Tax Collection in Indonesia?

    A tax amnesty bill, which protects corruptors from prosecution and penalties when bringing overseas funds back to Indonesia and fulfill tax obligations, will soon be discussed among Indonesia's government and the House of Representatives (DPR). A tax pardon is expected to result in enhanced tax collection next year. According to the latest data from Indonesia's Finance Ministry's Tax Directorate General, the country only managed to collect IDR 686 trillion (approx. USD $51 billion), or 53 percent of its 2015 tax revenue target, in the period 1 January - 5 October 2015.

    Read more ›

No business profiles with this tag