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Today's Headlines Eric Sugandi

  • Economic Growth Indonesia Expected to Slow in First Quarter of 2018

    Economic Growth Indonesia Expected to Slow in First Quarter of 2018

    Despite (modestly) accelerating economic growth since 2016, concerns about Indonesia's gross domestic product (GDP) expansion persist. Indonesian Coordinating Minister for Economic Affairs Darmin Nasution said he expects Indonesia's economic growth to slow in the first quarter of 2018 (compared to Q1-2017) as the peak of the nation's big harvest is expected to occur in the second quarter this year (while last year it fell in the March/April period). Meanwhile, credit growth has remained bleak in Indonesia.

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  • Household Consumption Remains Key Engine Economic Growth Indonesia

    Household Consumption Remains Key Engine Economic Growth Indonesia

    Eric Sugandi, Chief Economist at SKHA Institute for Global Competitiveness (SIGC), believes household consumption will remain the main engine of economic growth in Indonesia in 2017, followed by the other engines, namely direct investment and government spending. Regarding household consumption, Sugandi says the middle class contributes significantly to economic growth of Southeast Asia's largest economy due to their robust consumption. Traditionally, household consumption accounts for between 55 and 58 percent of Indonesia's gross domestic product (GDP).

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  • Taking a Look into Indonesia's Public Debt to GDP Ratio

    Taking a Look into Indonesia's Public Debt to GDP Ratio

    Indonesia's public debt - as a percentage of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP) - currently stands at 27 percent, or roughly IDR 3,200 trillion (approx. USD $241 billion). This debt is manageable and actually quite low compared to other key emerging economies or advanced economies. For example, Malaysia's and Brazil's public debt-to-GDP ratios reached 56 percent and 70 percent, respectively. Meanwhile, the ratios of the USA and Japan stand at 105 percent and 246 percent, respectively. However, the level of debt is not that important. The important question is how is this debt used?

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  • Can Bank Indonesia’s US Dollar Purchase Restriction Support the Rupiah?

    Can Bank Indonesia’s US Dollar Purchase Restriction Support the Rupiah?

    Last week, Indonesia’s central bank (Bank Indonesia) refrained from adjusting its relatively high interest rate regime as it is committed to support the ailing rupiah and combat high inflation. Another decision that was revealed by Bank Indonesia is the soon-to-be-introduced regulation that limits total (non-collateral) monthly US dollar purchases to USD $25,000 (down from USD $100,000 previously). This regulation will be implemented in a move to thwart speculators that want to take advantage of the weak and volatile rupiah.

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  • Consumer Price Index Indonesia: July Inflation under Control

    Consumer Price Index Indonesia: July Inflation under Control

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects to see Indonesian inflation in July in the range of 0.46 - 0.60 percent month-on-month (m/m). Inflation in Indonesia always peaks during the months June, July and August due to increased consumer spending in the context of Ramadan and Idul Fitri celebrations as well as the start of the new school season. Earlier this month, Governor Agus Martowadojo said to expect annual inflation to dip below 7 percent in July, from 7.26 percent (y/y) in June.

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  • Eric Sugandi: Indonesian Rupiah May Touch IDR 13,900 per US Dollar

    Eric Sugandi: Indonesian Rupiah May Touch IDR 13,900 per US Dollar

    Eric Sugandi, Chief Economist at the Standard Chartered Bank, expects Indonesia’s rupiah to have depreciated to IDR 13,900 per US dollar by the end of the year from IDR 13,339 currently (29/06) due to the impact of the bullish US dollar ahead of monetary tightening in the USA and the looming Greek exit from the Eurozone. Actually, this is a conservative prognosis. In case Indonesia’s central bank does not raise its benchmark interest rate (BI rate), currently at 7.50 percent, pressures on the rupiah may increase in fact increase further.

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  • Government Indonesia Offers Tax Breaks to Improve Current Account

    Government Indonesia Offers Tax Breaks to Improve Current Account

    Per May 2015 the government of Indonesia will offer tax breaks to companies that export a minimum of 30 percent of their production. Earlier this month, Indonesian President Joko Widodo signed a package that includes the tax break for exporters as well as a tax break for multinational companies that are willing to re-invest profits in Indonesia instead of sending profits and dividends to shareholders abroad. This package is designed to improve Indonesia’s trade balance (and the related current account balance).

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  • Analysis: Impact US Monetary Tightening on the Indonesian Economy

    The Standard Chartered Bank expects the economy of Indonesia to accelerate slightly in 2015 compared to this year’s estimated performance. The bank forecasts a growth pace of 5.2 percent year-on-year (y/y) next year, up from 5.1 percent (y/y) in 2014. Standard Chartered Bank economist Eric Sugandi recently said that the Indonesian economy will be affected by two factors: the great rotation (capital outflows from emerging markets ahead of US interest rate hikes) and growth disparity (slowing growth or recession in China and Japan).

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Latest Columns Eric Sugandi

  • Bank Indonesia’s Key Interest Rate Expected to Be Kept at 7.50%

    Bank Indonesia’s Key Interest Rate Expected to Be Kept at 7.50%

    Although the business community in Indonesia requests that the country’s benchmark interest rate (BI rate) is lowered at Bank Indonesia’s next Board of Governor’s Meeting (scheduled for Thursday 12 June 2014), it is highly unlikely that the central bank will alter its BI rate which currently stands at 7.50 percent. The relatively high BI rate curbs business expansion and therefore limits higher economic expansion in Indonesia. However, several factors justify the continuation of the BI rate at 7.50 percent.

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  • Bank Indonesia Expects Indonesian Economy to Grow 5.3% in Q2-2014

    Bank Indonesia Expects Indonesian Economy to Grow 5.3% in Q2-2014

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) expects Indonesia’s economy to grow by 5.3 percent in the second quarter of 2014. If realized, it means that gross domestic product (GDP) of Southeast Asia’s largest economy will accelerate from the disappointing GDP growth result recorded in the first quarter of 2014 (5.21 percent). Perry Warjiyo, Deputy Governor at Bank Indonesia, said that growth in Q2-2014 will be primarily supported by household consumption and investments which traditionally peak in the second quarter.

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  • Bank Indonesia May Hike Interest Rates to Safeguard Financial Stability

    Bank Indonesia May Hike Interest Rates to Safeguard Financial Stability

    Standard Chartered Bank Economist Eric Sugandi expects that the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) will have raised its benchmark interest rate (BI rate) by 50 basis points (bps) to 8.00 percent by the end of 2014. Sugandi also said that it is highly unlikely that Bank Indonesia will lower its BI rate in the next two years amid further Federal Reserve tapering and possible US interest rate hikes in 2015 and 2016. Moreover, the Indonesian government may still decide to reduce fuel subsidies further (thus triggering inflationary pressures).

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  • Analysis of Indonesia's Rupiah Rate: Improvement in Second Half 2014?

    Analysis of Indonesia's Rupiah Exchange Rate: Improvement in Second Half 2014?

    In the Bloomberg Dollar Index, Indonesia's rupiah exchange rate depreciated 0.47 percent to IDR 12,238 per US dollar on Monday (27/01). The decline of the rupiah was in line with today's trend of weakening Asia Pacific currencies (against the US dollar). Meanwhile, the central bank's mid rate (the Jakarta Interbank Spot Dollar Rate or JISDOR) depreciated 0.17 percent to IDR 12,198 per US dollar. Market participants are concerned about Indonesia's January 2014 inflation and further Federal Reserve tapering.

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