Below is a list with tagged columns and company profiles.

Today's Headlines Banking

  • Banking Sector Indonesia: NPL Ratio Improved in June 2017

    Banking Sector Indonesia: NPL Ratio Improved in June 2017

    The non-performing loan (NPL) ratio in Indonesia's banking sector improved slightly in June 2017. Mirza Adityaswara, Senior Deputy Governor at Indonesia's central bank (Bank Indonesia), said the gross NPL ratio was 2.97 percent in June, down from 3.09 percent in the preceding month. Despite the overall still relatively high NPL ratio in the banking sector, Adityaswara believes Indonesian banks still have room for credit expansion.

    Read more ›

  • Corporate Earnings Indonesia H1-2017: Bank Mandiri

    Corporate Earnings Indonesia H1-2017: Bank Mandiri

    Overall, the banking industry of Indonesia is setting a good performance in 2017 supported by rising credit growth and a lower non-performing loan (NPL) ratio. State-controlled (yet listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange) financial institution Bank Mandiri, the largest Indonesian bank by assets, reported a 33.7 percent year-on-year (y/y) increase in net income to IDR 9.5 trillion (approx. USD $714 million) in the first half of 2017.

    Read more ›

  • Indonesia Stock Exchange: Banking Sector Outperforms Other Sectors

    Indonesia Stock Exchange: Banking Sector Outperforms Other Sectors

    The big Indonesian banks that are listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX) have seen their shares surge so far in 2017. Moreover, their share performance is expected to retain this momentum in the second half of 2017. Among the big banks Bank Danamon Indonesia is leading the race. Its shares have surged 34.77 percent so far this year, followed by Bank Rakyat Indonesia (+27.62 percent), Bank Negara Indonesia (+26.70 percent), Bank Mandiri (+16.85 percent), and Bank Central Asia (+18.39 percent).

    Read more ›

  • Credit Growth in Indonesia's Banking Sector Back on Track in 2017?

    Credit Growth in Indonesia's Banking Sector Back on Track in 2017?

    Credit growth in Indonesia's banking sector is estimated to have, finally, touched double-digit figures in the first half of 2017, while growth should further accelerate in the remainder of the year. Some Indonesian banks saw their credit growth figures touch 20 percent (y/y) so far this year, a marked improvement from the situation one year ago. Lets zoom in on the performance of two big Indonesian banks.

    Read more ›

  • Monetary Policy Bank Indonesia: Easing the Minimum Statutory Reserves

    Monetary Policy Bank Indonesia: Easing the Minimum Statutory Reserves

    Following the announcement last year, the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) has again stated that it is to ease the minimum statutory reserves (in Indonesian: giro wajib minimum) regulations for conventional local banks (both for rupiah and foreign-denominated currencies). With this looser approach, banks can manage their liquidity more effectively, which should lead to reduced volatility on the overnight money market ("interest rate buffer").

    Read more ›

  • Indonesia's GDP Growth Curtailed by High Non-Performing Loan Ratio

    Indonesia's GDP Growth Curtailed by High Non-Performing Loan Ratio

    Indonesian banks are expected to be cautious boosting credit disbursement in the next couple of quarters because the non-performing loan (NPL) ratio is currently high with the gross NPL ratio hovering above 3 percent since mid-2016, approximately the same level as it was in 2011 when Indonesia's five-year economic slowdown commenced. Although various external and internal matters were to blame for Indonesia's 2011-2015 economic slowdown, the high NPL ratio today can undermine economic acceleration as credit growth is curbed.

    Read more ›

  • Tax & Transparency: No More Banking Data Secrecy in Indonesia?

    Tax & Transparency: No More Banking Data Secrecy in Indonesia?

    After decades of the "banking information secrecy" culture in Indonesia, local banks now seem more willing to share clients' financial information to tax authorities (both local and foreign authorities). Earlier, Indonesian banks were reluctant to disclose this information as such transparency could mean banks would lose valuable clients. These "big clients" supply over half of banks' deposits. However, the situation has now changed due to the government's tax amnesty program.

    Read more ›

  • Non Performing Loans (NPLs) May Rise in Indonesia's Banking Sector

    Non Performing Loans (NPLs) May Rise in Indonesia's Banking Sector

    Chances are big that the banking sector of Indonesia will see the non performing loan (NPL) ratio rise up to the range of 3.0 - 3.5 percent in 2017. Anton Gunawan, Chief Economist at state-controlled Bank Mandiri, says the rising NPL ratio is not so much caused by the lower quality of credit in Indonesia's banking system. The bigger problem is rising "special mention" loans, a loan grade that refers to assets that pose potential weaknesses that require close attention.

    Read more ›

  • Royal Bank of Scotland NV Ends Business Activities in Indonesia

    Royal Bank of Scotland NV Ends Business Activities in Indonesia

    Indonesia's state news agency Antara reported that the Financial Services Authority (OJK), the government agency that regulates and supervises the financial services sector, revoked the license of the local unit of the Royal Bank of Scotland NV (RBS NV), hence effectively ending the company's business in Indonesia. The revocation was conducted on request of the lender's headquarters in the Netherlands. This request was sent on 1 November 2016. The bank had a long history in Indonesia. RBS NV started operations in 1969 in Southeast Asia's largest economy under the name ABN AMRO BANK NV Indonesia.

    Read more ›

Latest Columns Banking

  • Indonesia's Tax Authorities Can Monitor Taxpayers' Bank Accounts

    Indonesia's Tax Office now has more power to check whether people and companies indeed pay taxes. Last week the Indonesian government basically scrapped the existence of banking data secrecy by introducing a new regulation that gives the nation's tax authorities access to information on accounts held at financial institutions, including bank accounts. The new regulation should contribute to a more transparent financial system and boost the government's (much-need) tax revenue realization. However, Indonesian parliament still needs to approve the new regulation.

    Read more ›

  • Indonesian Financial Institutions in Focus: Bank Tabungan Negara

    Indonesian Financial Institutions in Focus: Bank Tabungan Negara

    Bank Tabungan Negara (BTN), market leader in Indonesia's mortgage loans sector, is expected to maintain steadily growing earnings supported by House Ownership Credit growth (in Indonesian: Kredit Pemilikan Rumah, abbreviated KPR) and stable financing costs. In fact, RHB Securities and Bahana Securities believe credit growth of BTN will outperform average credit growth in Indonesia's banking sector in full-year 2017. Both securities firm set their credit growth target for BTN at 18 percent (y/y), boosted by subsidized KPR.

    Read more ›

  • Low National Savings: People of Indonesia Fail to Save Incomes

    Low National Savings: People of Indonesia Fail to Save Incomes

    Indonesia's gross national savings per gross domestic product (GDP) remained stagnant according to a statement from the nation's Financial Services Authority (OJK) earlier this week. This indicates that Indonesian residents do not manage to save money, but rather focus on consumption. Based on data from the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Indonesia's gross national savings per GDP stood at 30.87 percent in 2015. For comparison, figures of Singapore and China stood at 46.73 percent and 48.87 percent, respectively.

    Read more ›

  • Financial Institutions in Focus: Bank Negara Indonesia (BNI)

    Financial Institutions in Focus: Bank Negara Indonesia (BNI)

    The corporate earnings of Bank Negara Indonesia (BNI) up to the third quarter of 2016 are in line with expectations. Net income of Indonesia's fourth-largest lender (by assets) rose 28.7 percent (y/y) to IDR 7.7 trillion (approx. USD $529 million) compared to net income in the same period one year earlier (IDR 5.99 trillion), supported by a 21 percent (y/y) increase in credit disbursement to IDR 372 trillion (approx. USD $28.6 billion) and the higher net interest income margin (6.2 percent).

    Read more ›

  • Snapshot of the Indonesian Economy: Risks, Challenges & Development

    Snapshot of the Indonesian Economy: Risks, Challenges & Development

    Tomorrow (05/02), Statistics Indonesia is scheduled to release Indonesia's official full-year 2015 economic growth figure. Nearly all analysts expect to see a figure that reflects the continuation of slowing economic growth. Southeast Asia's largest economy expanded 5.0 percent in 2014 and this is expected to have eased further to 4.7 percent or 4.8 percent in 2015 on the back of (interrelated) sluggish global growth, low commodity prices, and weak export performance. Domestically, Indonesia has or had to cope with high interest rates and inflation (hence curtailing people's purchasing power and consumption as well as business expansion).

    Read more ›

  • Banking Sector Indonesia: OJK Needs More People to Combat Fraud

    Banking Sector Indonesia: OJK Needs More People to Combat Fraud

    Indonesia's Financial Services Authority (OJK), the central government's agency that regulates and supervises Indonesia's financial services sector, needs to hire hundreds of new staff in order to safeguard monitoring of the nation's banking sector and to enhance its early warning system in order to detect possible corruption cases. As up to 350 OJK workers are expected to return to the central bank per 1 January 2017, good monitoring of the banking sector is in jeopardy.

    Read more ›

  • Indonesia's Conventional Banks to Spin Off Islamic Units by 2024

    Indonesia's Conventional Banks to Spin Off Islamic Units by 2024

    Indonesia's Financial Services Authority (OJK), the government agency that regulates and supervises the nation's financial services sector, is preparing a new regulation that requires conventional financial institutions in Indonesia to spin off their Islamic financial units before 17 October 2024. Islamic finance or Islamic banking is a type of banking that is in accordance to the principles of sharia (Islamic law). Based on the regulation, those financial institutions that generate at least 50 percent of their capital through Islamic finance have to comply with the new rule.

    Read more ›

  • S&P: Indonesia's Banking Industry Stable but Profitability May Weaken

    S&P: Indonesia's Banking Industry Stable but Profitability May Weaken

    New York-based financial services firm Standard & Poor's stated that Indonesia's banking industry will feel the negative impact of Indonesia's sluggish economic growth in combination with persistently low commodity prices next year. This combination may weaken profitability of the nation's banking industry. S&P puts Indonesia's economic growth in 2016 at 5 percent (y/y), below the International Monetary Fund's and World Bank's forecast as well as the central government's target, all at 5.3 percent (y/y).

    Read more ›

  • How Can a Foreigner (Expat) Open a Foreign Currency Bank Account in Indonesia?

    How Can a Foreigner (Expat) Open a Foreign Currency Bank Account in Indonesia?

    Indonesia’s Financial Services Authority (OJK) issued a new regulation that simplifies the opening of a foreign currency bank account by a foreign national (expat). A circular, S-246/S.01/2015 (dated 15 September 2015 and signed by OJK Chairman Muliaman D. Hadad), has been sent to all directors of Indonesian commercial banks that conduct business in foreign currencies. This new rule, part of the economic policy package that was released by the Indonesian government on 9 September, aims to boost foreign currency funds in Indonesia and support the rupiah.

    Read more ›

  • Banking in Foreign Currencies for Expats in Indonesia Made Easier

    Banking in Foreign Currencies for Expats in Indonesia Made Easier

    Soon it will be easier for foreigners (expats) to have a foreign currency bank account (non-rupiah) in Indonesia. Muliaman D. Hadad, Chairman of the Financial Services Authority (OJK), stated it is bound to issue a new regulation that allows for easier banking in foreign currencies in Indonesia. This regulation is made in an effort to raise the country’s foreign exchange reserves and support the ailing rupiah.

    Read more ›