Below is a list with tagged columns and company profiles.

Today's Headlines Capital Outflows

  • Stock Market Update Indonesia: Return of Foreign Investors?

    Stock Market Update Indonesia: Return of Foreign Investors?

    The benchmark Jakarta Composite Index closed 0.06 percent higher at 6,6067.14 points on Friday (24/11), not far from its all-time record high. It is interesting to note that foreign investors showed a renewed interest in Indonesian stocks over the past three trading days. Foreigners recorded a "net buy" of IDR 2.59 trillion (approx. USD $192 million) over these three days.

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  • Expensive Stock Valuations: Foreign Investors Exit Indonesia

    Expensive Stock Valuations: Foreign Investors Exit Indonesia

    The high price-to-earnings ratio (PER) of Indonesia's benchmark Jakarta Composite Index has caused foreign investors to record net selling since 4 July 2017. The peak occurred on Tuesday (25/07) when foreign investors recorded net selling of IDR 1.65 trillion (approx. USD $124 million). So far this year, foreign net buying into Indonesian stocks now stands at IDR 6.56 trillion (approx. USD $493 million).

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  • Bank Indonesia Also Expects US Interest Rate Hike in March 2017

    Bank Indonesia Also Expects US Interest Rate Hike in March 2017

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) is also among the many institutions or market participants that expect the Federal Reserve to raise its Fed Funds Rate by 25 basis points at the coming Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting (14-15 March 2017). This move should put some temporary pressure on the Indonesian rupiah (as Indonesia will most likely see capital outflows) and therefore Bank Indonesia sees few to none room for additional monetary easing in Southeast Asia's largest economy in the remainder of this year.

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  • How Indonesia Responds to the Looming US Fed Funds Rate Hike

    Ahead of looming higher interest rates in the USA, Indonesia's financial authorities seem confident that the impact of tightening US monetary policy on Indonesia's capital markets will be controlled as Indonesia's economic fundamentals are solid, while the nation's central bank (Bank Indonesia) and government are ready to step in to stabilize the rupiah exchange rate or the pace of capital flows, if needed.

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  • Bank Indonesia Remains Positive Despite Outflows after Trump Win

    Bank Indonesia Remains Positive Despite Outflows after Trump Win

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) informed that around IDR 30 trillion (approx. USD $2.26 billion) of capital outflows from Indonesia occurred after Donald Trump was chosen as 45th US president in November. His victory caused a high degree of uncertainty about future US political and economic policies, while markets also expect to see a stronger US economy as Trump is expected to focus on the interests of the USA, and not so much on its impact on the international community.

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  • Impact Federal Reserve Interest Rate Hike on Indonesia's Markets

    Impact Federal Reserve Interest Rate Hike on Indonesia's Markets

    For sure Indonesia's financial system will be affected by the Federal Reserve's decision to implement another interest rate hike, and especially emerging market currencies - including the rupiah - are vulnerable to further monetary tightening in the world's top economy. Most analysts now believe a Fed Funds Rate (FFR) hike could occur in July 2016. In previous rounds of US monetary tightening (QE tapering and the December 2015 FFR hike) we witnessed large capital outflows from Indonesia. What will be the impact of another US interest rate hike on Indonesia?

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  • Indonesia's Rupiah Outperforming Global Currencies, Risks Remain

    The Indonesian rupiah has become the center of attention being the strongest emerging market currency (tracked by Bloomberg) so far this year. Indonesia's currency has appreciated 4.97 percent (spot market) against the US dollar since the start of 2016, outperforming the Brazilian real and Malaysian ringgit. Meanwhile, Indonesian government and central bank officials say they are committed to encourage further strengthening of the rupiah. On Friday (04/03), Bank Indonesia's benchmark rupiah rate (Jakarta Interbank Spot Dollar Rate, abbreviated JISDOR) appreciated 0.76 percent to IDR 13,159 per US dollar.

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  • Dilemma Bank Indonesia: To Cut Interest Rates or Not?

    Dilemma Bank Indonesia: To Cut Interest Rates or Not?

    The central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) is currently dealing with a dilemma. On the one hand, its relatively high interest rate environment (with the benchmark BI rate at 7.50 percent) is partly responsible for the country’s slowing economic growth as credit expansion is curtailed and economic activity declines. On the other hand, Bank Indonesia’s high BI rate is needed to safeguard Indonesia’s financial stability as inflation is still above the central bank’s target, the current account deficit nearly unsustainable, and capital outflows loom.

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  • Rupiah & Stock Market Update Indonesia: Still Going Downhill

    Rupiah & Stock Market Update Indonesia: Still Going Downhill

    Indonesian stocks continue to fall on today’s trading day (28/04). After having declined 3.49 percent yesterday, the benchmark Jakarta Composite Index fell a further 1.00 percent during the first trading session on Tuesday. Investors, particularly foreign ones, are still concerned about weak first quarter financial results of listed Indonesian companies, signalling that the country’s economic growth in Q1-2015 will be disappointing too. Furthermore, the market is waiting for results of the Federal Reserve’s two-day policy meeting which is set to start today.

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  • The 3 Reasons why Indonesian Stocks Fell Sharply on Monday

    The benchmark stock index of Indonesia - Jakarta Composite Index (IHSG) - fell sharply on Monday (27/04) amid mixed regional stock markets. Three main factors caused the weak performance of Indonesian stocks. Firstly, several key companies posted weak first quarter corporate earnings. Secondly, Indonesia’s economic growth in the first quarter may fall below 5 percent (y/y), which would be a six-year low. Lastly, Indonesia is getting bad press around the globe due to imminent executions of convicted foreign drug traffickers.

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Latest Columns Capital Outflows

  • Indonesian Stocks at Record High Despite Foreign Outflows

    Indonesian Stocks at Record High Despite Foreign Outflows

    After touching a new all-time record high level last week, analysts are optimistic that Indonesia's benchmark Jakarta Composite Index will surpass the psychological level of 6,000.00 points later this year. Last Friday (25/08) the benchmark index of Indonesia reached 5,915.36 points, a new record, while market capitalization touched IDR 6,481.8 trillion (approx. USD $483.9 billion).

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  • Fitch Ratings Affirms Indonesia's BBB- Investment Grade Credit Rating

    Fitch Ratings Affirms Indonesia's BBB- Investment Grade Credit Rating

    Global credit rating agency Fitch Ratings affirmed Indonesia's sovereign credit rating at BBB- (investment grade) with a stable outlook. The country's long-term foreign and local currency issuer default rating, the senior unsecured foreign and local currency bonds, and Islamic certificates (sukuk) were all affirmed at BBB-. Meanwhile, the short-term foreign currency IDR was affirmed at 'F3', the country ceiling at BBB, and the outlook on the long-term IDRs are stable. Through the affirmation Fitch acknowledges Indonesia's ongoing commitment to structural reforms amid recent economic woes.

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  • World Bank Releases October 2015 Indonesia Economic Quarterly

    World Bank Releases October 2015 Indonesia Economic Quarterly

    Today (22/10), the World Bank released the October 2015 edition of its flagship Indonesia Economic Quarterly, titled "In Times of Global Volatility". In the report the World Bank states that despite current ongoing global uncertainties (caused by looming monetary tightening in the USA and China's economic slowdown), which make macroeconomic management difficult in the year ahead, pro-active government action could offset the negative impact and may help to boost growth.

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  • Interest Rate Environment: Why Bank Indonesia Left it Unchanged?

    Interest Rate Environment: Why Bank Indonesia Left it Unchanged?

    Indonesia’s central bank (Bank Indonesia) decided to hold the country’s key interest rate (BI rate) at 7.50 percent, the deposit facility rate at 5.50 percent, and the lending facility rate at 8.00 percent at the Board of Governor’s Meeting conducted on Tuesday 17 March 2015. Bank Indonesia said that its decision is in line with its ongoing efforts to push inflation back to the target range of 4±1 percent for both 2015 and 2016, and to guide the country’s current account deficit towards a healthier level at 2.5-3 percent of GDP in the medium term.

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  • Economy of Indonesia: Inflation, Trade, Interest Rates & Rupiah Update

    Indonesia’s consumer price index fell for the second consecutive month in February 2015, recording deflation of 0.36 percent month-on-month (m/m) in February, while on an annual basis Indonesian inflation eased to 6.29 percent (y/y), down from 6.96 percent (y/y) in the preceding month. Inflationary pressures declined primarily on the back of lower prices of chili peppers and fuel. Easing inflation in Southeast Asia’s largest economy may provide room for Indonesia’s central bank (Bank Indonesia) to cut interest rates further this year.

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  • Analysis Global Market Volatility: Impact on Indonesia’s Rupiah

    Indonesia’s rupiah exchange rate and stocks opened stable on Wednesday (17/12) after two days marked by severe pressures on emerging market assets. By 11:30 am local Jakarta time, Indonesia’s rupiah was down 0.09 percent to IDR 12,736 per US dollar (according to the Bloomberg Dollar Index), while Indonesian stocks were up 0.41 percent by the same time. Yesterday, the rupiah nearly touched IDR 13,000 per US dollar (its lowest level since the Asian Financial Crisis in 1997-1998), before the central bank decided to support the currency.

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  • Indonesia Needs +7% GDP Growth to Become High Income Country by 2030

    In order to avoid the middle-income trap and join the ranks of the high income countries by 2030 (reaching a per capita income level of at least USD $12,500), Indonesia needs to raise economic growth beyond the 7 percent year-on-year (y/y) level. If the current gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate is maintained (between 5 and 6 percent y/y) then it will take another decade to break from the middle income trap and become a high income country. However, GDP growth in 2014 is projected at a bleak 5.2 percent (y/y).

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  • Bank Indonesia about Inflation and the Current Account Deficit

    Bank Indonesia about Inflation and the Current Account Deficit

    The central bank of Indonesia expects that Indonesia’s current account deficit will decline to below the three percent of gross domestic product (GDP) mark by the end of this year supported by sharply falling global oil prices and Indonesia’s recent subsidized fuel price hike. Hendar, Deputy Governor of the central bank, said that for every USD $1 decline in global oil prices, the country’s current account deficit narrows by about USD $170 million. Indonesia’s current account deficit fell to 3.1 percent of GDP in Q3-2014 (from 4.06 percent of GDP in Q2-2014).

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  • Macroeconomic Stability Indonesia: Inflation and GDP Update

    The Governor of Indonesia’s central bank, Agus Martowardojo, said that he expects inflation to accelerate to 6.1 percent year-on-year (y/y) in November 2014, significantly up from 4.83 percent y/y in the previous month. Accelerated inflation is caused by the multiplier effect triggered by the recent subsidized fuel price hike in Southeast Asia’s largest economy. On 18 November 2014, the government introduced higher prices for subsidized fuels in a bid to reallocate public spending from fuel consumption to structural development.

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  • Current Account Balance Indonesia: Deficit of 3.07% of GDP in Q3-2014

    Current Account Balance Indonesia: Deficit of 3.07% of GDP in Q3-2014

    The current account deficit of Indonesia eased to USD $6.84 billion, or 3.07 percent of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP) in the third quarter of 2014 (down from USD $8.69 billion, or 4.07 percent of GDP in the previous quarter). This improvement was mainly supported by a solid surplus in the country’s non-oil & gas sector, partly the result of the US economic recovery as well as resumed copper concentrate exports by Freeport Indonesia and Newmont Nusa Tenggara (after successful mining contract renegotiations).

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