Below is a list with tagged columns and company profiles.

Today's Headlines Banking

  • Banking Sector Indonesia: NPL Ratio Improved in June 2017

    Banking Sector Indonesia: NPL Ratio Improved in June 2017

    The non-performing loan (NPL) ratio in Indonesia's banking sector improved slightly in June 2017. Mirza Adityaswara, Senior Deputy Governor at Indonesia's central bank (Bank Indonesia), said the gross NPL ratio was 2.97 percent in June, down from 3.09 percent in the preceding month. Despite the overall still relatively high NPL ratio in the banking sector, Adityaswara believes Indonesian banks still have room for credit expansion.

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  • Corporate Earnings Indonesia H1-2017: Bank Mandiri

    Corporate Earnings Indonesia H1-2017: Bank Mandiri

    Overall, the banking industry of Indonesia is setting a good performance in 2017 supported by rising credit growth and a lower non-performing loan (NPL) ratio. State-controlled (yet listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange) financial institution Bank Mandiri, the largest Indonesian bank by assets, reported a 33.7 percent year-on-year (y/y) increase in net income to IDR 9.5 trillion (approx. USD $714 million) in the first half of 2017.

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  • Indonesia Stock Exchange: Banking Sector Outperforms Other Sectors

    Indonesia Stock Exchange: Banking Sector Outperforms Other Sectors

    The big Indonesian banks that are listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX) have seen their shares surge so far in 2017. Moreover, their share performance is expected to retain this momentum in the second half of 2017. Among the big banks Bank Danamon Indonesia is leading the race. Its shares have surged 34.77 percent so far this year, followed by Bank Rakyat Indonesia (+27.62 percent), Bank Negara Indonesia (+26.70 percent), Bank Mandiri (+16.85 percent), and Bank Central Asia (+18.39 percent).

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  • Credit Growth in Indonesia's Banking Sector Back on Track in 2017?

    Credit Growth in Indonesia's Banking Sector Back on Track in 2017?

    Credit growth in Indonesia's banking sector is estimated to have, finally, touched double-digit figures in the first half of 2017, while growth should further accelerate in the remainder of the year. Some Indonesian banks saw their credit growth figures touch 20 percent (y/y) so far this year, a marked improvement from the situation one year ago. Lets zoom in on the performance of two big Indonesian banks.

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  • Monetary Policy Bank Indonesia: Easing the Minimum Statutory Reserves

    Monetary Policy Bank Indonesia: Easing the Minimum Statutory Reserves

    Following the announcement last year, the central bank of Indonesia (Bank Indonesia) has again stated that it is to ease the minimum statutory reserves (in Indonesian: giro wajib minimum) regulations for conventional local banks (both for rupiah and foreign-denominated currencies). With this looser approach, banks can manage their liquidity more effectively, which should lead to reduced volatility on the overnight money market ("interest rate buffer").

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  • Indonesia's GDP Growth Curtailed by High Non-Performing Loan Ratio

    Indonesia's GDP Growth Curtailed by High Non-Performing Loan Ratio

    Indonesian banks are expected to be cautious boosting credit disbursement in the next couple of quarters because the non-performing loan (NPL) ratio is currently high with the gross NPL ratio hovering above 3 percent since mid-2016, approximately the same level as it was in 2011 when Indonesia's five-year economic slowdown commenced. Although various external and internal matters were to blame for Indonesia's 2011-2015 economic slowdown, the high NPL ratio today can undermine economic acceleration as credit growth is curbed.

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  • Tax & Transparency: No More Banking Data Secrecy in Indonesia?

    Tax & Transparency: No More Banking Data Secrecy in Indonesia?

    After decades of the "banking information secrecy" culture in Indonesia, local banks now seem more willing to share clients' financial information to tax authorities (both local and foreign authorities). Earlier, Indonesian banks were reluctant to disclose this information as such transparency could mean banks would lose valuable clients. These "big clients" supply over half of banks' deposits. However, the situation has now changed due to the government's tax amnesty program.

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  • Non Performing Loans (NPLs) May Rise in Indonesia's Banking Sector

    Non Performing Loans (NPLs) May Rise in Indonesia's Banking Sector

    Chances are big that the banking sector of Indonesia will see the non performing loan (NPL) ratio rise up to the range of 3.0 - 3.5 percent in 2017. Anton Gunawan, Chief Economist at state-controlled Bank Mandiri, says the rising NPL ratio is not so much caused by the lower quality of credit in Indonesia's banking system. The bigger problem is rising "special mention" loans, a loan grade that refers to assets that pose potential weaknesses that require close attention.

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  • Royal Bank of Scotland NV Ends Business Activities in Indonesia

    Royal Bank of Scotland NV Ends Business Activities in Indonesia

    Indonesia's state news agency Antara reported that the Financial Services Authority (OJK), the government agency that regulates and supervises the financial services sector, revoked the license of the local unit of the Royal Bank of Scotland NV (RBS NV), hence effectively ending the company's business in Indonesia. The revocation was conducted on request of the lender's headquarters in the Netherlands. This request was sent on 1 November 2016. The bank had a long history in Indonesia. RBS NV started operations in 1969 in Southeast Asia's largest economy under the name ABN AMRO BANK NV Indonesia.

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Latest Columns Banking

  • Life of an Expat in Indonesia: Some Experiences with Indonesian Banks

    Life of an Expat in Indonesia: Some Experiences with Indonesian Banks

    If you move to Indonesia for a longer period – either for work or just for living – you will most likely want (or need) to open a bank account at a local bank (or a foreign bank that has a branch in Indonesia). After all, if you continue to use a foreign bank account, then it will involve relatively high bank charges each time you withdraw money from the automated teller machine (ATM) in Indonesia, or when you conduct an international transaction (online banking).

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  • Widodo Wants Indonesia's Banking Sector to Boost Credit Growth

    Widodo Wants Indonesia's Banking Sector to Boost Credit Growth

    At a special occasion at the Presidential Palace in Jakarta, Indonesian President Joko Widodo urged local banks to become more aggressive in terms of lending as credit disbursement in Indonesia's banking sector only reached IDR 4,782 trillion (approx. USD $349 billion) in 2017, hence growing by only a modest 8.3 percent year-on-year (y/y), thus unable to provide an optimal boost to domestic economic growth.

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  • Dutch Queen Maxima Visits Indonesia to Monitor Financial Inclusion Program

    Dutch Queen Maxima Visits Indonesia to Monitor Financial Inclusion Program

    The Queen of the Netherlands, Maxima, visited Indonesia between 11-13 February 2018 to monitor the progress of Indonesia's Financial Inclusion Program, a program that was launched in August 2016 during Maxima's last visit to Indonesia. Hence, during her latest visit, the Dutch Queen came in her role as the United Nations Secretary-General's Special Advocate for Inclusive Finance for Development.

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  • Telkom Satellite Error Causes Problems at Indonesian ATMs

    Telkom Satellite Error Causes Problems at Indonesian ATMs

    Since Friday (25/08) many Indonesians are having trouble to use ATMs (for withdrawing money and conducting various payments). Last week the Telkom-1 satellite started to suffer technical difficulties as a shift on the satellite's pointing antenna disrupted transponders. Considering most of Indonesia's major banks use this satellite, owned by Telekomunikasi Indonesia, for their telecommunication network, thousands of ATMs - hence millions of Indonesians - are affected.

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  • Listed Companies Indonesia: Bank Mandiri to Conduct Stock Split

    Listed Companies Indonesia: Bank Mandiri to Conduct Stock Split

    Bank Mandiri, one of Indonesia's leading financial institutions, plans to conduct a stock split in order to enhance investor interest by making its stocks more affordable and liquid for retail investors. However, the state-controlled lender is still studying whether to opt for a 2-for-1 stock split or a 3-for-1 split. Bank Mandiri is one of Indonesia's blue chip stocks that ranks among the biggest 10 companies in terms of market capitalization on the Indonesia Stock Exchange.

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  • Mining in Indonesia: Concern about High Non-Performing Loan Ratio

    Mining in Indonesia: Concern about High Non-Performing Loan Ratio

    The non-performing loan (NPL) ratio in Indonesia's mining and excavation sector has risen drastically over the past year. Moreover, there seems few room for an improvement of the NPL ratio in this sector on the short term because mining and excavation companies are expected to remain amid tough conditions in the remainder of the year. The NPL ratio is a key indicator for measuring bad loans.

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  • Moody's & IMF Positive about Indonesia's Banking Sector

    Moody's & IMF Positive about Indonesia's Banking Sector

    Both Moody's Investors Service and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) released positive reports on Indonesia's banking sector. While Moody's changed its outlook on Indonesia's banking sector from stable to positive, the IMF said Indonesia's banking system is strong enough to cope with relatively slow economic growth and a rise in bad loans.

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  • Minimum Threshold for Indonesia's "Bank Openness Law" Revised

    Minimum Threshold for Indonesia's "Bank Openness Law" Revised

    The government of Indonesia listened to the criticism that emerged after it decided to set a rather low threshold for bank accounts that are to become subject to the automatic bank information exchange program. Through Finance Ministry regulation PMK No. 70/PMK.03/2017 Indonesia's tax authorities obtain access to information on accounts held at financial institutions, including bank accounts. This new regulation makes it possible to check whether tax payers indeed fulfill their tax obligations.

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  • Which Bank Accounts Are Checked by Indonesia's Tax Authorities?

    There exists some resistance against the Indonesian government's recently announced regulation that gives tax authorities access to information on accounts held at financial institutions, including bank accounts. The regulation aims to contribute to a more transparent financial system as well as to boost the government's tax revenue realization (tax evaders will need to be more careful now authorities can monitor private and corporate bank accounts).

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  • Indonesia's Salim Group Wants to Build a "New Bank Central Asia"

    Indonesia's Salim Group Wants to Build a "New Bank Central Asia"

    The Salim Group, one of Indonesia's biggest conglomerates (owning leading companies in various sectors of the Indonesian economy), has high ambitions in the nation's banking sector after having acquired a majority stake in Bank Ina Perdana in early March 2017. For the first time in 19 years the conglomerate, founded by Sudono Salim in 1972, is back in Indonesia's banking industry.

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